Folsom (Temporal Keyword)

1-6 (6 Records)

The Analysis of a Late Holocene Bison Skull from Fawn Creek, Lemhi County, Idaho, and Its Implications for Understanding the HIstory and Ecology of Bison in the Intermountain West (1997)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kenneth P. Cannon.

In 1995 the skull of a subadult male bison was recovered from the cutbank of Fawn Creek, Lemhi County, Idaho, by a ranger for the Salmon-Challis National Forest. After slowly drying the skull for about a year it was turned over to the Midwest Archeological Center in order to be stabilized and analyzed for clues to the ecology of Late Holocene bison in the Intermountain West. A number of analytical techniques were applied to the skull in order to understand its age of deposition and ecology....


Archeology's New Look, Public Production (1949)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Paul L. Cooper.

When the Congress of the United States authorized the Missouri River Basin Project, the foundation was laid for one of the largest archeological research programs in history. The authorization brought into being a plan to build some 105 dams and reservoirs on the main stem of the Missouri River and its tributaries in an area which had been the first, and is the present, home of the Plains Indians. The area abounds in village sites, tipi rings, campsites, slaughter pits, and other evidences of...


From Big Game Hunter to Forager on the Northwestern Plains Smithsonian Institution / River Basin Survey (1967)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Oscar L. Mallory.

In earlier issues of Progress the gains in knowledge of the village dwellers of the Missouri River have been discussed and described. For this report attention will be directed to the earlier, technologically less sophisticated, hunter and gatherers who inhabited the Plains from about 2,000-7,000 years ago. This document contains a brief overview of those who inhabited the Plains and calls for a full investigation of the mountain refuge hypothesis.


Geophysical Prospection And Archeological Investigations Of The Proposed Bridge Replacement, Entrance Road Realignment, And New Visitor Parking Lot Project At The Fort Larned National Historic Site, 14PA305, Pawnee County, Kansas (2012)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Steven L. DE Vore. Albert M. LeBeau III.

The National Park Service’s Midwest Archeological Center staff with Volunteer- In-Parks participants conducted geophysical investigations of the underground electric line installation construction project at the Fort Larned National Historic Site (14PA305) in Pawnee County, Kansas. The geophysical investigations were conducted between July 13 and July 18, 2009. The investigations were requested by the FOLS resource manager at the Fort Larned National Historic Site. The project was located along...


MACROFLORAL ANALYSIS AND AMS RADIOCARBON DATING OF SEDIMENT FROM SITE LA 169200, NEW MEXICO (2011)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman. Peter Kovacik.

Sediment from an area of ashy fill mixed with charcoal pulled from the road bed in an area of a pipeline trespass at site LA 169200 in southeastern New Mexico was examined for macrofloral remains. Charcoal fragments recovered from the sample were submitted for AMS radiocarbon dating. This site is a dispersed surface artifact scatter with five associated hearth features containing fire-cracked rock and lithic artifacts. Four of the five diagnostic projectile points recovered from this site...


POLLEN AND PHYTOLITH ANALYSIS OF SEDIMENT SAMPLES AND AMS RADIOCARBON DATING OF THE FOLSOM BLOCK AT THE BLACKWATER DRAW LOCALITY AND FROST ARROYO, NEW MEXICO (2012)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings. Chad Yost.

The Blackwater Draw Locality on the llano estacado in northeastern New Mexico has been the focus of archaeological study intermittently over the past several decades. Analysis including both pollen and phytolith proxy records was undertaken to provide paleoenvironmental information for time periods it spanning from the Folsom occupation into post-occupational sediments. Four localities within this area were selected for the initial testing. In part, this testing was exploratory in nature to...