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PHASE I ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF APPROXIMATELY 360 ACRES AT THE PINE TREE TRACT AIKEN COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Author(s): William Green ; Jeff Holland ; Ian K. deNeeve

Year: 2005

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Summary

"During April 11–21, 2005, TRC conducted an intensive Phase I archaeological survey of approximately 360 acres at the Pine Tree Tract, located one mile northwest of the community of Vaucluse in Aiken County, South Carolina. The project area is bound by Sage Mill Branch on the west, Interstate-20 on the south, State Highway 105 (Old Vaucluse Road) and the headwaters of Camp Branch to the east, and other portions of the Pine Tree tract to the north. The project area is a 360-acre portion of a larger, 1,600-acre tract that was the subject of a reconnaissance survey in March 2005 (deNeeve 2005). This portion of the tract, designated Area C, was believed to have a high potential for containing intact archaeological sites based on topography, distance to water, soil type, and minimal prior land disturbance. Archaeological survey of the 360 acres identified six new sites—38AK943 through 38AK948— and ten isolated finds. All of the sites were classified as nondiagnostic lithic scatters and none are eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. As a result, no additional archaeological investigations are recommended for Area C of the Pine Tree Tract."


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Cite this Record

PHASE I ARCHAEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF APPROXIMATELY 360 ACRES AT THE PINE TREE TRACT AIKEN COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA. William Green, Jeff Holland, Ian K. deNeeve. Columbia, South Carolina: TRC Solutions. 2005 ( tDAR id: 391308) ; doi:10.6067/XCV89Z965C


URL: http://artsandsciences.sc.edu/sciaa/


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -82.253; min lat: 33.242 ; max long: -81.188; max lat: 33.856 ;

Individual & Institutional Roles

Contributor(s): Ian K. deNeeve ; Jeff Holland ; Marty Baltzegar ; Weldon Wyatt ; Fred Humes ; Sharon L. Pekrul ; Chad Long

Principal Investigator(s): William Green

Prepared By(s): TRC Solutions

Submitted To(s): S&ME, Inc.


Record Identifiers

TRC Project No.(s): 48025

Notes

General Note: "TRC has completed an intensive Phase I archaeological survey of 360 acres, designated Area C, at the proposed Pine Tree tract in Aiken County. Based on an initial reconnaissance survey (deNeeve 2005), several areas of the original 1,600-acre Pine Tree tract were deemed likely to contain archaeological sites. Area C was the largest of the areas recommended for intensive survey, and is the only one that is currently planned to be impacted by construction activities. During the survey, a total of six sites—38AK943 through 38AK948—and ten isolated finds were recorded. With the exception of two isolated finds, one an early Archaic Palmer point and the other a piece of simple-stamped pottery, all of these resources are nondiagnostic lithic scatters that are ineligible for inclusion in the NRHP. Based on these results, no historic properties will be affected by the proposed undertaking, and it is TRC’s recommendation that no additional work should be necessary within the 360 acres in Area C, nor within the 950 acres that were judged to have a low potential for containing significant archaeological sites during the initial reconnaissance survey (deNeeve 2005). There are still approximately 290 acres in Areas A, B, D, and E that were recommended as having a moderate to high potential for containing significant archaeological sites (see Figure 2). If these areas are to be impacted by ground-disturbing activities, and if the undertaking is subject to the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, then additional Phase I survey may be necessary in those portions of the Pine Tree tract."


File Information

  Name Size Creation Date Date Uploaded Access
redacted-pine-tree-ph-i-report-final.pdf 2.64mb Jul 26, 2013 6:29:35 AM Public
pine-tree-ph-i-report-final.pdf 8.73mb Jul 26, 2013 6:29:38 AM Confidential
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America