Encounters in the East African Bush: Game Trophies, African Hunting and the (Neo)Colonial Appropriation of Heritage

Author(s): Alexandra C Kelly

Year: 2019

Summary

This is an abstract from the "Itinerant Bureaucrats and Empire" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

This paper traces growing colonial anxiety surrounding the management of East Africa’s natural heritage through sporadic encounters between white and indigenous hunters, distraught villagers, colonial officials, smugglers and safari tourists. Concerns about the availability of game for sport hunting, the supposed "cruelty" of indigenous hunting practices, government ivory, and colonial profits proliferate in the archives of British East Africa. These concerns play out alongside indigenous unease about shamba-raiding elephants, the restriction of traditional hunting areas and practices, as well as access to bush meat and other wildlife resources. Through these encounters, and as part of a larger project exploring the commodity chain of colonial ivory, this paper tracks the emergence of a conservation ethos that continues to appropriate East African resources, rights and desires within global heritage frameworks. 

Cite this Record

Encounters in the East African Bush: Game Trophies, African Hunting and the (Neo)Colonial Appropriation of Heritage. Alexandra C Kelly. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 449029)

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Keywords

General
Colonialism heritage Ivory

Geographic Keywords
United States of America

Temporal Keywords
Colonial/Historical

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 202