Centering the Margins of "History": Reading Material Narratives of Identity Along the Edges of the Colonial Southeast (ca. 1650-1720)

Author(s): Jon Marcoux

Year: 2019

Summary

This is an abstract from the "Frontier and Settlement Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Not long ago, our "historical" narratives concerning 17th and 18th-century southeastern Indian communities read like colonial maps with neatly depicted "Tribal" territories and towns. Like those maps, the narratives presented a timeless "history" for groups whose identities were rooted to specific locations. This paper traces a shift in our perspective as we have grown to appreciate the mutability and fluidity of the late 17th and early 18th century colonial landscape. I explore artifact data from a number of sites to identify material traces of the social "reshuffling" that unfolded during this period - a process materialized as "improvised" diasporic communities.

Cite this Record

Centering the Margins of "History": Reading Material Narratives of Identity Along the Edges of the Colonial Southeast (ca. 1650-1720). Jon Marcoux. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 449071)

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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 172