Rescue Archaeology in Cameroon: An Analysis of the Controversial Implication Role of Students

Author(s): Martin ELOUGA

Year: 2019

Summary

This is an abstract from the "Reflections, Practice, and Ethics in Historical Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Rescue archaeology is recent in Cameroon. Despite the legal and regulatory measures taken by the state, construction and exploitation of natural resources projects rescue archaeology is not developed in the field. The destruction of historical, archaeological, and ethnographic heritage is tremendous. The Chad-Cameroon pipeline project has given rise to the development of rescue archeology. Now, the archaeological component is taken into account in major construction and exploitation of natural resources projects in Cameroon. A special field of observation has thus opened up to archaeologists, teachers and students. A field opened to competition from national and European archaeologists, where the implication as well as the role of the students, remain unclear and remarkably controversial. Our reflection aims to shed more light on the issue, based on past experiences with archaeological monitoring, and to provide guidelines for the efficient and beneficial participation of the students.

Cite this Record

Rescue Archaeology in Cameroon: An Analysis of the Controversial Implication Role of Students. Martin ELOUGA. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 449154)

Spatial Coverage

min long: 8.508; min lat: 1.654 ; max long: 16.207; max lat: 13.085 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 466