Commodification, Taskscapes, And The Alienation From Landscape At The Biry House In Castroville, Texas

Author(s): David Hanley

Year: 2019

Summary

This is an abstract from the "Working on the 19th-Century" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

Scholars have employed Ingold’s concept of the taskscape in order to understand how past population interacted with their landscape. In a historic context, taskscape connections between past populations and their landscape become harder to understand due to commodity fetishism, when the capitalist market both spatially and socially alienates those using an object from that object’s production. This alienation of person from thing also causes the taskscape to become disjointed, resulting in the proliferation of multiple taskscapes. However, these historic analyses can still be achieved by studying material remains and this paper examines a specific case study: the Biry House ceramic assemblage from Castroville, Texas. Since the historic ceramics within this assemblage constantly move in and out of a commodity state throughout their social lives and operate through multiple taskscapes in a capitalist market, these materials could be an indicator of how past populations were alienated from their landscape.

Cite this Record

Commodification, Taskscapes, And The Alienation From Landscape At The Biry House In Castroville, Texas. David Hanley. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, St. Charles, MO. 2019 ( tDAR id: 449173)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 506