tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

The Influence of Religious Authority in Everyday Life: A landscape scale study of domestic architecture and religious law in ancient Hawai‘i

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

Public architecture has proven its utility as a metric for the materialization of religious authority however archaeologists have been less successful at identifying how ideology is materialized outside of formal ritual settings. Here we address the question of how religious laws that dictated separation of people and activities – known as the kapu system – influenced the way homes were built in pre-European contact era Hawai‘i. On the landscape scale, we consider three variables that could be correlated with the influence of religious authority: distance to a local temple marking a district boundary, the degree of daily interaction within the community, and investment in household architecture. Our findings suggest religious authority was materialized with a high degree of ubiquity across all house sites without regard to any of these factors; a pattern consistent with pervasive religious authority across daily life.


Cite this Record

The Influence of Religious Authority in Everyday Life: A landscape scale study of domestic architecture and religious law in ancient Hawai‘i. ( tDAR id: 402020) ; doi:10.6067/XCV8G162H0


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -155.899; min lat: 19.021 ; max long: -155.85; max lat: 19.058 ;

Resource Inside this Project (Viewing 1-1 of 1)

  • GIS (1)

GIS

  1. Manukā Archaeological Reconnaissance Survey (GIS layers, 1 of 9) (2012)
Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America