Islands (Other Keyword)

1-25 (25 Records)

4,000 years of animal translocations: Mocha Island and its zooarchaeological record (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Roberto Campbell. Ismael Martínez.

Islands are territories that allow us to assess phenomena and processes in a way that is impossible to do in the mainland. One of these concerns the human interaction with animals that are usually considered as wild. The case of Mocha Island (Chile; South Pacific, 38,36°S) is remarkable because of its small size (50 km2), proximity to the mainland (30 km), three different and independent human occupation events, and an endemic terrestrial fauna constituted only by small reptiles, amphibians,...


The Archaeology of Cowboy Island: The Santa Rosa Historic Archaeology Project (SRHAP) (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Courtney H. Buchanan. Amber M Madrid. Brittany N Lucero. Michael McGurk. Jennifer E Perry.

This paper presents the findings from the first year of a new historic archaeology research project on Santa Rosa Island, one of the five islands of Channel Islands National Park off the coast of southern California. A new, multi-year project dedicated to recording the extant historic structures and sites related to the 19th- and 20th-century ranching complex was started in 2014, instigated by the recent opening of the Santa Rosa Island Research Station. Since May 2014, four CSU Channel Islands...


Carceral Islands in Latin America: Comparing the Galapagos to Other Sites of Frontier Criminal Exile (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ross W. Jamieson.

This is an abstract from the "Frontier and Settlement Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Our excavations at the El Progreso Hacienda in the Galapagos are working towards an understanding of this remote late 19th century sugar plantation, and its use of criminals and vagrants for part of the workforce.  The use of the Galapagos as islands of exile/imprisonment has been an ongoing part of the relationship of Ecuador to the Galapagos, and...


Chapter 3. Origins and Development of Islands (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick D. Nunn.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Chapter 6. Island Landscapes (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick D. Nunn.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Chapter 7. Low Coral Islands and Reefs (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick D. Nunn.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Chapter 8. Sea Level and Islands (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick D. Nunn.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Fishing and Ecological Resilience on California’s Channel Islands (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Terry Joslin.

On California's Channel Islands, the Chumash and Tongva relied on a relatively consistent repertoire of small and medium-bodied fish species over a period of more than 10,000 years. Throughout all time periods, the majority of fishes in the archaeological record could have been procured from the near shore waters of rocky intertidal, sandy beach, and kelp forest habitats. There is also limited evidence for offshore fishing for large pelagic fish later in time. I argue that the significant...


Gathering Evidence: Terrestrial Plant Resources of California’s Islands (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kristina Gill. Kristin Hoppa.

The abundance and diversity of terrestrial plant resources on the islands off the Pacific coast of southern Alta and Baja California vary in terms of island biogeographic distribution, ranging from pine forests and oak/juniper woodlands, to chaparral, cactus scrub and grassland habitats, among others. These plant resources provided food, medicine, and raw materials for island populations. However, island plant resources have long been described in the literature as "depauperate," an idea based...


Human Ecodynamics of Subarctic Islands of the North Atlantic and North Pacific in Comparative Perspective (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ben Fitzhugh. George Hambrecht. Michael Etnier. Catherine West.

The subarctic islands of the North Atlantic and North Pacific share a number of ecological characteristics, related to common latitudes and similar oceanographic and atmospheric conditions. Both regions were occupied in pre-modern times by subsistence harvesters with varying degrees of dependence on the marine environments for survival, and both areas became incorporated into capitalist, commercial fishing and hunting markets in the past several centuries. We compare the historical ecology of...


Islands and Invasives: The Archaeology of Plant and Animal Translocations (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jean-Denis Vigne.

This presentation aims to show how the progresses of biological knowledge allows archaeology to take advantage of the paleontological and archaeozoological documentation accumulated during the last 40 years on the islands, to increase its set of evidence –admittedly indirect -- on the early seagoing in the Mediterranean. It presents a brief review of the geographical and paleogeographical frameworks as well as the basics of island biogeography and focuses on the different ways in which mammals...


The Longue Duree of Malta (Mediterranean) and Lismore (Argyll, Scotland) Compared and Contrasted, and Set within Concluding Remarks (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Simon Stoddart. Christopher Hunt. David Redhouse. Ewan Campbell. Charles French.

The author has undertaken fieldwork on both of these two limestone island systems, one in the Mediterranean, one leading into the Atlantic. The paper will reflect on the longue duree development of these two contrasting contexts, in terms of the rhythms of settlement organisation and interaction. The first, Lismore, an area of only 23.5 square km, is set within an enclosed maritime zone close to shore, off the western seaboard of Scotland. The second, Malta, a larger area of 316 square km, is...


Marginalization of the Margins: The Importance of Smaller Islands in Human Prehistory (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Aaron Poteate. Scott Fitzpatrick.

Across the world’s seas and oceans, archaeological research focused on islands has traditionally privileged those which are larger in size. Myriad reasons can explain this phenomenon, ranging from the (mis)perception by scholars that prehistoric peoples would have been attracted to the greater number and diversity of resources typically available on larger islands, to the ephemeral aspect of archaeological evidence on smaller land areas along with issues that archaeologists face in terms of...


"Marineness" and Variability in Maritime Adaptations in the Late Ceramic Age Northern Lesser Antilles (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Crock. Nanny Carder. Sebastián Castro.

Archaeological investigations in the northern Lesser Antilles have demonstrated Amerindians’ dependence on marine foods and maritime exchange throughout the Late Ceramic Age. While these data confirm the assumption that small island populations were, by necessity, maritime adapted, they also reveal subtle variability in the degree to which islanders’ depended on marine resources and the extent to which they engaged in interisland exchange networks. We use environmental and archaeological data to...


The Meaning Of The Offshore: The Role Of Islands In The Maritime Cultural Landscape Of Peru (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carlos Ausejo. Vicente Cortez.

The authors will present their research about the relationship of the islands to the mainland in Peru, emphasizing the islands role as sacred places, economic spaces, and harbors for oceanic crossroads. This paper will present the close relationship between the islands and the Andean mainland over time, from prehispanic times to present day, including a panoramic view of the role and value societies place on the islands located in the Peruvian offshore. Using written sources such as ethno...


Measuring Human Impacts on Islands Relative to Size (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John O'Connor. Scott Fitzpatrick. Todd Braje. Matthew Napolitano. Thomas Leppard.

Archaeological research on islands worldwide demonstrates that initial colonists exerted substantial environmental impacts on local ecologies, ranging from the extirpation of native species to landscape modification. The degree of impact was dependent on a host of variables, including the kinds and number of introduced plant and animal species, the remoteness of settled islands, and extent of interaction between discrete landmasses. Yet, there is still much to learn about the consequences of...


Natural vs. Human-caused Extinctions of Terrestrial Vertebrates in the Bahamas (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David Steadman. Janet Franklin. Jim Mead. Angel Soto-Centeno. Nancy Albury.

We report 83 taxa of vertebrates (11 reptiles, 63 birds, 9 mammals) from late Pleistocene bone deposits in Sawmill Sink, Abaco, The Bahamas. These bones were recovered by scuba divers in non-cultural contexts at water depths of 27-35 m. Among the 83 species, 40 (48%) no longer occur on Abaco (4 reptiles, 31 birds, 5 mammals). We estimate that 17 of the 40 losses (all of them birds) are linked to changes during the Pleistocene-Holocene Transition (~15 to 9 ka) in climate (becoming more warm and...


Oceanic Islands (1994)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick D. Nunn.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Patterns and Outliers in Prehistoric Island Mobility: Comparing the Strontium Data (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Thomas Leppard. Jason Laffoon.

During the colonisation of islands in the Pacific and Caribbean by agropastoral communities, a variety of proxies (e.g., material, genetic, zoogeographic) indicate substantial inter-island and inter-community contact. It has been suggested that this contact represents an adaptive response to intrinsic demographic fragility during the initial phases of island colonisation, and that this connectivity imperative faded in the aftermath of initial dispersal as overall population density increased....


The Pre-Columbian Exchange: The Anthropogenic Zoogeography of Insular Caribbean Translocations (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Fitzpatrick. Christina Giovas. Michelle LeFebvre.

The post-Columbian introduction of exotic animals in the West Indies initiated a cascade of ecological changes, resulting in extensive defaunation, reduction and homogenization of biodiversity, loss of ecosystem services, and extinction of island endemics. Yet, these changes were not without precedent in the Caribbean, one of the world’s foremost biodiversity hotspots. Evidence suggests that in the years before 1492, Amerindians in the region had already profoundly impacted insular ecology,...


Prehistoric Human Impacts to Isands of Amami and Okinawa, Japan (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hiroto Takamiya. Hitoshi Yonenobu. Taiji Kurozumi. Takeji Toizumi.

Islands colonization by Homo sapiens is relatively recent phenomenon in the history of Homo sapiens (modern human or human afterwords). While modern human successfully colonized five continents by 10,000 years ago, only handful islands were colonized by 10,000 years ago. Most islands were successfully colonized after 10,000 years ago. Islands seem to be one of the most difficult environments for modern humans to successfully colonize. However, once Homo sapiens successfully colonized island...


Rhythms of Stability and Change in the Central Mediterranean (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rowan McLaughlin. Katrin Fenech. Rory Flood. Michelle Farrell. Ronika Power.

This paper explores changing patterns of isolation in prehistoric island societies, and their ongoing connections with the wider world. The case study is the expansion of agriculture in Southern Europe in the 6th millennium BC, and subsequent landscape and cultural evolution in the Maltese archipelago. This was a series of maritime events, establishing connectivity between Mediterranean islands whose inhabitants’ ‘Neolithic package’ lifeway permitted high-density settlements in small islands. In...


The Shrinking Island: Out-Migration and Settlement Organization, 19th – 20thcentury Inishark, Ireland. (2020)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ian Kuijt.

This is an abstract from the session entitled "Historical Archaeology on the Island of Ireland: New Perspectives" , at the 2020 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Although recognized as an important topic in historic archaeology, surprisingly little research has focused on understanding the linkages between out-migration, shifting trans-Atlantic economies, and resulting change in residential practices. Drawing upon archaeological excavation, archival research,...


Traditional Ecological Knowledge of Coral Reef Small Islands: A History of Human Adaptation in the Florida Keys (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Traci Ardren. Scott Fitzpatrick. Victor Thompson.

The Florida Keys have been largely overlooked in models of social interactions within both Florida and the greater Caribbean. Environmentally and culturally distinctive, the more than 1700 islands that make up this coral reef archipelago are consistently viewed from the mainland in models of human-environmental dynamics over time. This paper synthesizes available archeological data on the prehistoric human occupation of the Florida Keys with attention to the island landscapes of these sites that...


Why colonize? A case study of the early Neolithic Colonization of the island of Cyprus. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alan Simmons.

Why humans colonize unoccupied lands, such as islands, has always intrigued scholars. Over the past few decades, researchers working on the Mediterranean island of Cyprus have documented both a Late Epipaleolithic occupation and a more substantial early Neolithic colonization episode. The number of such sites remains limited, but is growing with continuing research. For the Neolithic, both Pre-Pottery Neolithic A and PPNB occupations are now well-documented, and are as early as mainland...