Memory (Other Keyword)

1-25 (69 Records)

Archaeology and Dissonant Memories of Japanese American Incarceration (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Koji H. Ozawa.

Memories of the Japanese American Incarceration Camps during WWII vary widely across America. For some, memories of the incarceration are a focal point of their identity and a driver of political action. Others who underwent this imprisonment chose not to recall their experiences. The incarceration can haunt their descendants as an ever-present but silenced past. Broadly, the United States’ relationship to this past is fractured. Activists invoke the incarceration as an affront to American...


The Archaeology of Playing Indian: Boy Scout Camps as Colonial Imaginaries (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Craig N. Cipolla.

Over the last 20 years archaeologists have come to pay close attention to the complexities of indigenous agency, cultural continuity and change, and survivance in colonial contexts. In their focus on materiality and everyday life, in their use of multiple lines of evidence, and in their connections to contemporary indigenous communities, archaeologists have the ability to challenge colonial narratives. In contrast, the ways in which these narratives (e.g., notions of savagery, authenticity, and...


An Archeology of Labor in Practice (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul Shackel.

Labor studies in the twenty first century are at a crucial turning point. As labor has steadily lost influence in the United States, labor organizations have been increasingly memorializing crucial moments in labor history. These moments are often clashes between labor and capital in which any victory, and sometimes losses, were hard fought. The new National Historic Landmark study of labor archaeology provides guidelines to help us identify significant sites and provide a new way to contribute...


The Battlefields Are the Only Thing We Have: Archaeology, Race, and Thanatourism in the Trans-Mississippi South (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carl Drexler.

Archaeology has a long history with the tourism industry. Thanatourism focuses on sites associated with death and violence, such as battlefields, and conflict archaeology can be a powerful means to connect with the public and aid in the development of war-related sites as tourist draws. For American Civil War sites, thanatourism is a potential boon to depressed rural southern economies and a means to improve preservation and interpretation of archeological sites. Archaeologists can have a...


The Castro Colonies Heritage Association's Living History Center: An Introduction to the Archaeological Project (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ruth Van Dyke.

In the 1840s, empresario Henri di Castro brought Alsatian settlers from the Rhine Valley to south Texas, where the new arrivals joined established Mexican families, German immigrants, and displaced Apache.  Today, the Castro Colonies Heritage Association (CCHA) is transforming a 19th-century property into a Living History Center, intended as a focal point for Alsatian heritage tourism. In partnership with the CCHA, Binghamton University archaeologists have completed three excavation seasons at...


Ceramic Technologies and Technologies of Remembrance - an Iroquoian Case Study (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gregory Braun.

The patterned deposition of certain objects, often in association with materials or structures that are seen to have symbolic associations, is an act of memorialization seen in many Neolithic and broadly shamanic societies throughout the world. This paper uses petrographic and contextual data to explore how objects manufactured with certain material qualities may have served as symbolic referents to memories related to Ontario Iroquoian ritual and social practices, both at the object level, and...


Collective Memory and the Mycenaeans: The Argolid, Messenia, and the Mani Compared (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Galaty.

The concept of collective memory has received some attention in archaeology, but has not been systematically applied to processes of state formation and sociopolitical change. In this paper I model the evolution of collective memory systems in Greece from the Neolithic to Iron Age, with a focus on Mycenaean regions. The Argolid, Messenia, and the Mani – using The Diros Project’s excavations of a Mycenaean “ossuary” at Ksagounaki as a primary example – vary in terms of how collective memories...


Commemoration in the Wake of Catastrophe: A Historical Archaeology Investigation of Southern California's St. Francis Dam Disaster and its Victims (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann Stansell.

The commemoration of disasters and their victims is a product of cultural, economic, political, and social forces in human society. Southern California's largely forgotten St. Francis Dam Disaster of 1928 provides an excellent opportunity to study this complex process of commemoration, engaging memory within different frames of reference. Previous scholarship related to the disaster has been focused within the fields of civil engineering and geology, with the singular goal of determining the...


Community-Based Archaeology in the Bahamas: Linking Landscape and Memory (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elena Sesma.

In 1871, the last owner of the Millars Plantation Estate on Eleuthera, Bahamas left a portion of the former plantation acreage to the descendants of her former slaves and servants. In the intervening 175 years since emancipation in the Bahamas and the 125 years since the property transferred to "generation land", south Eleuthera has experienced a series of economic transformations and demographic transitions. Despite these changes, the Millars descendant community maintains their connection to...


Connerton’s "Seven Kinds of Forgetting" and the Lattimer Massacre: A critique and an application (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael P Roller.

Anthropologist John Connerton’s brief essay "Seven Kinds of Forgetting" provides a foundation and touchstone for recent explorations in the study of memory and modernity. Rhizomatic in nature, the essay succeeds in opening up, and also fragmenting, explorations of memory spanning a broad theoretical spectrum of critical, materialist and culturalist approaches. This essay adapts, critiques and expands upon Connerton’s notions of memory using the example of memory and forgetting in the subsequent...


Conquest, history and memory in highland Madagascar (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Zoe Crossland.

This paper looks at the ways in which history and memory were involved in the expansion of the early 19th century 'Merina' state of highland Madagascar. In his conquests of neighboring territories King Andrianampoinimerina gave history to some of his new subjects, and took it away from others. In considering how this played out I explore the implications for how we understand history and historicity, and for examining archaeology's relationship to history.


Contemporary Archaeologies of the Southwest (2011)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Uploaded by: Leigh Anne Ellison

Organized by the theme of place and place-making in the Southwest, Contemporary Archaeologies of the Southwest emphasizes the method and theory for the study of radical changes in religion, settlement patterns, and material culture associated with population migration, colonialism, and climate change during the last 1,000 years. Chapters address place-making in Chaco Canyon, recent trends in landscape archaeology, the formation of identities, landscape boundaries, and the movement associated...


‘Defending Jackson’s Ramparts’: The Political and Cultural Struggle of Preserving the Battle of New Orleans Historic Site (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph Stoltz.

In 1815, Andrew Jackson and the soldiers in his army defended a narrow strip of land along the Mississippi River in a desperate attempt to keep the British out of New Orleans.  More than one hundred years later, Jackson’s ramparts were again under assault, but this time by land developers interested in the valuable river front property.   In "Defending Jackson’s Ramparts," I examine the efforts of the Daughters of the War of 1812, the U.S. War Department, and the U.S. National Park service to...


Discourse and Narrative Production at Historic Sites: The Role of Documentary Archaeology in Addressing Structural and Symbolic Violence (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Marc Lorenc.

Expanding on conversations occurring in 19th century African American print culture studies, this paper explores the relationship of documentary archaeology to African American print materiality, black nationalism, and collective memory. Conceptualizing print material as mnemonic devices, the paper explores how print culture creates an imagined collectivity through the broad circulation of representational media. Specifically, this paper examines how these mnemonic devices, in relationship to...


Displacement, Memory, and Community Heritage Work in the Old City of Acre (Israel) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Evan P. Taylor.

In 2001, the Old City of Acre, a Palestinian quarter of the mixed Jewish-Palestinian municipality of Acre in northern Israel, was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site and state projects are underway to transform the Crusader and Ottoman-era landscape into a tourist attraction. This research asks how residents, most of whom belong to internally displaced families of 1948, are navigating the state heritage project. Memories of displacement  and of the relative safety and autonomy found in the...


The Dynamite Bombings of African-American Homes in mid-20th Century Dallas: Anarchistic Perspectives and Resurrecting the Memory of Domestic Terrorism (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Davidson. Edward Gonzalez-Tennant.

A series of dynamite bombings of black residences rocked the communities of Dallas in the 1940s and early 1950s.  Although acknowledged by the local and national press while the attacks were ongoing, these events are not a part of the popular or normative history of the city.  Current state and federal antiquities laws would almost certainly not perceive these properties as culturally or historically significant, and their materiality could remain unacknowledged and invisible.  While the act of...


The Enshrining of Fort Ste. Anne: Forgotten Memories and Selective Reconstruction of Vermont's Earliest European Occupation Site (2008)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Jessica R. Desaney.

This article in the Society for American Archaeology's (SAA) publication The SAA Archaeological Record recounts the excavations of a Historic period fort built by the French in 1666 on Isle La Motte, Vermont, an island on the northern edge of Lake Champlain. The fort was partially excavated in the early 1900's and a small, Catholic shrine to fur traders was built from building material and artifacts. This piece is a reflection on the construction of memory and identity through connections to...


Entanglement of Memories in Mesoamerica and Applications in the Palenque Region (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kimberly Salyers.

As social archaeologists, we have long affirmed the fluidity of social structures, yet we continue to experience proactive interference from the political economy lessons long embedded in our memory. Through the review of social memory applications in Mesoamerica, this paper discusses how the battle between the individual and the social approaches to memory fall victim to our current entanglements of memory. Building from this review, I will consider how incorporating applications of ArcGIS and...


Ethnography in the Unit: Archaeology As Elicitation (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Marc Lorenc.

Ethnographic approaches to archaeology have explored the way in which archaeological projects are themselves a fruitful site of study (Castenada and Matthews 2008; Hamilakis and Anagnostopoulos 2009). This paper will build on these approaches to explore how Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) archaeological projects open up a rich space for ethnographic inquiry. The paper develops a methodology that uses archaeology both as a craft and metaphor (Gonzalez-Ruibal 2013) in order to elicit...


Finding Nouvelle Acadie: Lost Colonies, Collective Memory, and Public Archaeology as an Expedition of Discovery (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark A Rees.

In 1765 more than 200 Acadian émigrés from Nova Scotia arrived in south Louisiana and established the colony of Nouvelle Acadie along the natural levees of the Bayou Teche.  Joined by fellow exiles and extended family, two centuries later their numerous descendants experienced a cultural revitalization as Cajuns living in a colonized homeland called Acadiana. During the past three years the New Acadia Project has surveyed portions of the Teche Ridge in search of the original home sites and...


Forgetting, Hybridity, Revitalization, and Persistence: A Model for Understanding the Archaeology of Enslaved African Ritual Practice in the Early Chesapeake (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Marley Brown III.

The topic of ritual practices among the enslaved population of the early Chespeake has been extensively examined,, most procatively by scholars such as Patricia Samford ,who have attempted to link what is known about the importation of captive Africans from historical sources to physical evidence encountered at the living sites of the enslaved in particular places during specific periods.  This paper develops a model, combining recent efforts to incorporate memory work, notably forgetting, into...


Garnets for the Vikings: Charismatic jewellery and family memories in early Viking Age Scandinavia (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Zanette Glørstad.

The paper presents how continental-inspired elite jewellery from the Merovingian period (550-800AD) continued to play an important role in the Viking Age Scandinavia (800 -1050 AD).The so-called "disc-on-bow" brooch were covered with garnets, and is one of the most spectacular jewellery types we know from this period in Europe. They nevertheless appear in a number of female graves from the Viking Age, revealing traces of having been used a long time, most likely passed down through several...


Gendering the Post-Conflict City: Memory, Memorialisation and Commemoration in Belfast (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura McAtackney.

Belfast has become synonymous with the study of insidious, civil conflict; especially how ethnic, political and religious divisions are materialized and reproduced in the contemporary city. The impact of focusing on segregation and sectarianism has dominated our understandings of the fractured city leaving the issue of gender sidelined. This paper aims to examine the contemporary city through the lens of competing placemaking strategies: the official implanting of contemporary art and the...


Granite Creek Station: Site of Massacre and Memory (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolyn White. Elizabeth Bennett. Laura Sechrist.

Granite Creek Station was one of several significant stopping places for emigrants, travelers, saddle trains, and stagecoaches passing through the Black Rock Desert region of Northern Nevada on their way to California in the mid-19th century. The site functioned as a campsite, trading post, ranch, stagecoach station, and military camp. As a site along the emigrant trail, it was the locus of extraordinary pain and suffering by travellers, described in their own words through diaries and letters....


Hñähño Narratives of San Ildefonso, Mexico: Social Memory in the form of Oral History (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mario Castillo.

Oral history is the process of audio-recording first person accounts of experiences, stories and memory from living witnesses. Oral history has proven to be a valuable resource for archaeologists. It is argued that oral history research is an important for foregrounding subsequent archaeological research. In the summer of 2015, 10 hours of audio-recorded personal narratives were recorded from five Hñähño/Spanish speakers in the colonial of El Bothe, San Ildefonso, Queretaro, Mexico. Hñähño...