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Discourse and Narrative Production at Historic Sites: The Role of Documentary Archaeology in Addressing Structural and Symbolic Violence

Author(s): Marc Lorenc

Year: 2016

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Summary

Expanding on conversations occurring in 19th century African American print culture studies, this paper explores the relationship of documentary archaeology to African American print materiality, black nationalism, and collective memory. Conceptualizing print material as mnemonic devices, the paper explores how print culture creates an imagined collectivity through the broad circulation of representational media. Specifically, this paper examines how these mnemonic devices, in relationship to place and practice, shape particular subjectivities through the transmission of collective memory both in the past and the present. Such an approach allows for a nuanced understanding of how the archive shapes and limits the formation and promotion of certain historical narratives and subjectivities at historic sites. This paper summarizes recent efforts towards increasing public awareness of the Dr. James Still Historic Office and Homestead in Medford, NJ, demonstrating how documentary archaeology can play a fundamental role in challenging structural and symbolic violence at multi-scalar level.


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Discourse and Narrative Production at Historic Sites: The Role of Documentary Archaeology in Addressing Structural and Symbolic Violence. Marc Lorenc. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434322)


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min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 331

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America