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Society for Historical Archaeology 2016

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Society for Historical Archaeology 2016


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Documents

  • The 18th Century Shipbuilding French Industry : New Perspective on Conception and Construction (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434715] Marijo Gauthier-Bérubé.

    The Machault, a French frigate, sank in Chaleur Bay, Québec, in the context of the Seven Years War, in 1760. Built in Bayonne, the archaeological analysis of the frigate gave us a unique vision of the 18th century shipbuilding industry. Coming from a privation shipyard next to the Arsenal of Bayonne, the Machault lay amidst a clash between regional shipbuilding traditions and the globalisation of naval techniques in Europe.   The study of the ship’s structural remains provides a unique view of...

  • 18th Century Stoneware From New Jersey (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435029] William Liebeknecht.

    The origins of the New Jersey stoneware industry -- and perhaps even the American stoneware industry -- seem to lie in the late 17th century with an awareness that high-grade clays suitable for making dense, hard, durable pottery were present in the South Amboy area of Middlesex County in the Province of East Jersey.  As early as 1685-86, there are indications in the court records of Burlington County in West Jersey that such clays were known to early settlers.  This clay source was presumably...

  • A 19th Century Military Landscape in Southern Maryland (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434295] Aaron M. Levinthal.

    The Maryland State Highway Administration's recent archaeological investigations in Charles County have helped to increase the understanding of a landscape that directly contributed to events that shaped a developing nation. The discovery and study of several War of 1812 and Civil War sites and loci, all within close proximity of one another, the port town of Benedict, and major waterborne and overland transportation corridors, has provided insights on choices made by 19th century military...

  • 19th Century Workhorses: The Examination of a Centerboard Schooner off Dog Island, Florida. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435055] Christopher Horrell.

    Between 2001 and 2003, the Dog and St. George Islands Shipwreck Survey, a research project conducted by the Florida State University Program in Underwater Archaeology, investigated a mid-to-late 19th century wooden-hulled centerboard schooner.  This site, while integral to instructing students on the various methodologies and techniques utilized to conduct archaeological investigations underwater, provides a glimpse into the Gulf of Mexico’s maritime history and culture.  To date, the shipwreck...

  • 19th-Century Innovation at a 21st-Century Industrial Park: Archaeological Investigations at the Valentine and Company Iron Ore Washing Plant, Centre County, Pennsylvania (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434651] Gary F. Coppock.

    It was during a standard Phase I archaeological survey for a proposed Centre County industrial park that the buried remains of a 19th-century industrial plant − the Valentine Iron Ore Washing Plant (36CE526) − were discovered.  Subsequent investigations revealed not only the layout of the facility, but also the important role that a local ironmaster had on the entire iron industry.  In 1815 several Valentine brothers relocated to Centre County to lease an idle iron furnace.  Soon they were...

  • The 2012 Field Season of the 1630-31 New Spain Fleet Archaeological Project in the Gulf of Mexico (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435056] Roberto Junco. Flor Trejo.

    The 2012 Field season of the 1630-31 New Spain Fleet Project of the Subdirección de Arqueología Subacuática INAH, has been a success and represents a leap in many regards from previous seasons. The project started in the year 1995 and has had many people involved throughout the years implementing diverse search methods and surveys. In the case of the 2012 field season, success came from a thoroughly thought methodological process to present a search area in the Gulf of Mexico where the Admiral...

  • 21st Century Methods for a 19th Century World: GIS, Geophysical Survey, and Geoarchaeology in Washington, D.C. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435086] Charde Reid.

    New and non-traditional techniques such as the geographic information system (GIS), geophysical survey, and geoarchaeology show great promise for investigating changing landscapes and urban deposition patterns. The Washington, D.C. Historic Preservation Office has begun implementing these non-invasive techniques as part of most Phase I investigations, especially in highly-developed areas. They are a cost-effective, efficient, and fast ways to identify areas of fill, buried stream channels,...

  • 21st Century Shipwreck Management Considerations on Lake Champlain (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434533] Christopher Sabick.

    The ongoing management of Lake Champlain's extraordinary collection of well-preserved Cultural Resources is an ever evolving and often challenging effort.  With the advent of new and cheaper technologies available to everyday boaters the locations of sensitive shipwrecks are easily detectable.  The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum is invested in applying new approaches and ideas to shipwreck management and this presentation will discuss some of the museums latest efforts in this dynamic management...

  • 21st-century Collaboration for Studying a 20th-century Working Community (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435101] Frederick E. Sutherland.

    This paper explores the social and economic effects on working communities in a former iron mining district in central Minnesota. Scholars and community members collaborated to document multiple standing structures of historic significance and hold discussions on how those sites could be preserved and featured in future cultural tourism plans. The narratives generated from the collaboration were strengthened by overlapping thematic categories used in multi-sited archaeology.

  • 3D Digitization of Archaeological Artifatcts in Conservation (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435088] Christopher Dostal.

    At the Conservation Research Laboratory at Texas A&M University, recent projects have all implemented some form of 3D modeling of artifacts as part of the documentation process for either before treatment, after treatment, or both.  The logistics of the implementation of 3D modeling as a standard documentation technique for every artifact in a collection can be daunting, especially when dealing with untreated waterlogged artifacts that must remain wet before conservation. This paper discusses...

  • The Abbey of Pedro Mártir de Anglería – Excavation, Reconstruction and Conservation of an Early 16th Century Ecclesiastical Structure in Jamaica (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434869] Robyn P Woodward.

    Christianity anchored the material practices and social institutions of the Spanish settlers in the New World and while Christian friars undoubted arrived in Jamaica with the initial group of settlers in 1509, the Jamaican abbacy was not formally founded until 1515. The ecclesiastical authorities used temporary thatch and wood structures for worship at the capital of Sevilla la Nueva until funds were provided for the construction of a stone church in 1524.  The abbey however, was not quite...

  • Above-ground Archaeology Of Industrial And Post-Industrial Detroit (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435103] Amanda Sosnowski. Suzanne Spencer-Wood.

    A survey of Detroit’s ruins reveals the spread of industrial decline among all kinds of sites, and the post-industrial transformation of urban landscapes. Maps show the spread of abandonment from factories to other businesses, transportation sites, and residential areas, including schools and police stations. Photos of abandoned buildings show the processes of decay and ruination, from vandalism to the weather. What can Detroit teach archaeologists about the interpretation of material evidence...

  • An Adaptive Legacy: Repurposing Lighthouses from Navigational Aids to Heritage Tourism Destinations in North Carolina (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434721] Lauren M Christian.

    The lighthouses of North Carolina were originally constructed to aid navigation through treacherous waterways, but the advancement of modern navigational equipment has diminished their necessity for that purpose. In 2000, the National Historic Lighthouse Preservation Act was enacted to see to the transference of federally owned historic light stations to qualified new stewards. Today, the National Parks Service, private organizations, and community associations manage the lighthouses on the...

  • Addressing Neglected Narratives Through The Maritime Cultural Landscape Of Point Pearce Aboriginal Mission/Burgiyana, South Australia (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434550] Maddy E Fowler.

    This paper presents results of research based upon an oral history, archaeological and archival case study of the maritime activities at Point Pearce Aboriginal Mission/Burgiyana in South Australia—the traditional land of the Narungga people. Point Pearce was established in 1868 and has been self-managed by the community since 1966, forming the historical time period for this study; however the research also draws on pre-contact knowledges. This case study was used to assess whether the maritime...

  • aDNA in Historical Archaeology As A Tool For The Mitigation Of Climate Change Hazards (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435010] George Hambrecht.

    The study of aDNA has become a highly productive avenue of study in Archaeolgoy, though perhaps less so in Historical Archaeology. This paper discusses a project in which aDNA from historic sites is being used to address many important issues typically approached by Historical Archaeology. Yet this project goes further in two specific ways.  First this project intends to map and when possible isolate genetic variation that has been lost in modern day domesitc animals but that can still be found...

  • African American Burials and Memorials in Colonial Williamsburg (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434244] Ywone Edwards-Ingram.

    This paper discusses archaeological findings within Colonial Williamsburg and explores factors that have influenced ways of knowing about eighteenth-century burial sites of African-descendant individuals and groups in Williamsburg, Virginia.  While the emphasis is on the colonial era, some attention is given to the nineteenth century and the more visible commemorations of the dead relating to this period.   The aim is to discuss burials and commemorative practices of enslaved and free blacks and...

  • The African American Cemetery at Catoctin Furnace: Bridging the Past and the Future (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434487] Jane I. Seiter.

    The Catoctin African American Cemetery is the resting place of at least 50 individuals who labored at Catoctin Furnace and its surrounding community from the 1770s to the 1840s. Many of these men and women were enslaved workers, while others were possibly part of the free black population that also lived and worked at the furnace. In 2014, an ambitious project to preserve, protect, and interpret the cemetery was launched. Documentary research, forensic analysis, and geophysical investigations...

  • African American Diaspora Archaeology and the National Park Service: Reflections on the Past and Goals for the Future (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434601] Meredith Hardy. David Morgan.

    For 50 years archeologists from the National Park Service’s Southeast Archeological Center have actively worked to uncover, preserve, and interpret African American archeological heritage in our National Parks. SEAC’s work has spanned from the Stafford slave village at Cumberland Island National Seashore to the William Johnson House in Natchez, Mississippi, from the lands owned by a free woman creole of color in Natchitoches, Louisiana to the waters off the cays and harbors in St. Croix, U.S....

  • African American Life in Central Delaware, 1770-1940: Archaeology Combined with Documentary Research (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434609] Heidi Krofft. Jason Shellenhamer.

    The historic farm site of Samuel Dale, an AME minister and leader in the African American community around Middletown, Delaware, was identified and evaluated for the U.S. Route 301 project.  The site was determined eligible, however, it was decided that a traditional data-recovery would not yield the greatest mitigation benefit.  Instead, a historic context detailing the African-American community in St. Georges Hundred from 1770-1940 was prepared to mitigate the impacts to the site.  The...

  • African Americans and NAGPRA: The Call for an African American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434603] Justin Dunnavant.

    Increasing urbanization and gentrification have led to the rapid development of some of America's largest cities. As urban space becomes more scarce, African American heritage sites face increasing threats from developers and city planners alike. In light the 50th anniversary of the National Heritage Preservation Act and more than 25 years after the passage of NAGPRA, this paper highlights the disparities and challenges associated with preserving African American heritage sites in the USA....

  • African-American In-Ground Vaults: An Investigation Into Differential Burial Practices Identified Through A Public Archaeology Initiative (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434252] Kevin A Gidusko. Patrisha L. Meyers.

    Historic cemeteries are some of the most threatened cultural resources in the state of Florida; of these, historic African-American cemeteries are most at risk. Subject to neglect, rapid urbanization, and the loss of community remembrance, these sites are in need of immediate preservation efforts. This paper discusses investigations into these sites through the work of the Florida Historic Cemeteries Recording Project (FLHCRP), a volunteer-driven effort overseen by the Florida Public Archaeology...

  • Agriculture As Impetus For Culture Contact In Carolina During The 1670s (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434364] Andrew Agha.

    The first colonists who arrived at Charles Towne in 1670 came with new tropical cultivars and familiar, Old World crops, as well as explicit planting instructions from the Lords Proprietors—mainly Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper, the 1st Earl of Shaftesbury. Shaftesbury was himself an avid British planter and asserted that planting, and nothing else, created colonies. His first plantation in Carolina did not produce the crops he desired, and in 1674, he founded a new, much larger estate farm. This...

  • Aiding Archaeological Site Interpretation through Soil Geochemistry (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434606] Michael J. Gall.

    This paper synthesizes the results of 45 soil geochemical studies undertaken on historic archaeological sites in Delaware since the 1990s that utilized weak acid extraction methods. Analysis was completed as part of an alternative mitigation survey for Delaware’s U.S. Route 301 project. The data reveals the importance of soil geochemistry in site and feature interpretation, site boundary delineation, archaeological site prospection, and spatial use analysis within sites. Soil geochemistry aids...

  • All of the Above: Public Archeology and Outreach at Independence National Historical Park (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434595] Jeffrey Collins. Patrice L Jeppson. Jed Levin.

    Public outreach has been part of the archeological research conducted by Independence National Historical Park since the inception of such studies more fifty years ago. These early efforts, by pioneers like Paul Schumacher, John Cotter, and Barbara Liggett at sites like Independence Square and Franklin Court, serve as the foundation for the park's current program of public archeology. Today, the practice of archeology in the park both serves and is shaped by diverse and distinct communities of...

  • "All The Usual Improvements": Understanding The Plantation Landscape At Ash Lawn-Highland (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434627] Kyle W. Edwards.

    Much of the existing scholarship on Ash Lawn-Highland has focused upon President Monroe’s domestic and political life, but little is known about the day-to-day functioning of the plantation including agricultural production, land management strategies, and the lives of enslaved laborers. In some ways these aspects have been seen as peripheral to Monroe’s political ascendance; however, in 19th-century Virginia, the productive organization of the plantation was socially significant, communicating...

  • All was left in complete order: a first look at the wreck of HMS Erebus (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435048] Ryan Harris.

    From the outset, remote-sensing data clearly indicated that the wreck of HMS Erebus survived in remarkably sound condition, a fact later borne out by first-hand diver inspection. This owes to the relatively benign physical environment in which the wreck is situated, its rather atypical site formation history, as well as the elaborate measures taken by Master Shipwrights of the Royal Navy Dockyards to fortify Erebus for Arctic Service. This paper will provide an overview, both internally...

  • America Loses a Star and Stripe. The First Full-Scale Battle of the Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779, the Battle of Brier Creek, Georgia. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434670] Daniel Battle.

    One of America's bloodiest Revolutionary War Battlefields remained lost and poorly understood until recently. The use of LiDAR mapping and terrain analysis, metal detection, and cadaver dogs, characteristics of a complicated battlefield environ revealed themselves. The Battle of Brier Creek, Screven County, Georgia was the first open land engagement of the British Southern Winter Campaign of 1778-1779. It was also the first Patriot offensive in the South against an overwhelming British force...

  • An American Dilemma: The Archaeology of Race Riots Past, Present, and Future (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434324] Edward Gonzalez-Tennant.

    At the center of Myrdal’s An American Dilemma is the understanding that cycles of violence continue to oppress African Americans. His dilemma refers to the inconsistency between this cycle and the national ethos of upward social mobility. The situation remains unchanged for many minorities today. This paper charts how this cycle of violence has transformed through time by drawing upon the author’s ongoing work in Rosewood, Florida and elsewhere. Although an archaeology of American race riots...

  • American Made: The Development of Ethnic Identities, Racism, and Economic Growth of the Young American Republic (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434845] Jordon Loucks.

    Ethnic identification in the archaeological record is fraught with pitfalls. The application of ethnic divisions on populations that helped construct the industrial arteries of New York State are a popular lens to view history through. The immigrant populations that gave life and limb to construct the Erie Canal and the New York Railroad system paved the way for the development of the industrial Northeast. This study hopes to evaluate the efficacy of ethnic identification of the archaeological...

  • American Stoneware, What it Looks Like from an 18th Century Point of View (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435034] Meta F Janowitz.

    Salt-glazed stoneware vessels and sherds found on 19th century sites are generally assumed to be of North American manufacture, unless they are highly decorated, but sherds from 18th century sites are usually identified as German made. American potters, however, made highly decorated vessels in the German style beginning in the early 18th century and many vessels attributed to Europe were made in New York, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania. These vessels can be identified by their pastes and other...

  • An Analysis of Cut Glass Collected from an Excavation of Lindenwood University’s Former Garbage Dump (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434872] Katlyn R Likely.

    In the 1800s, Lindenwood University, located in St. Charles, Missouri previously offered secondary education primarily to women.  During this time, the university disposed of garbage from the college in a garbage dump behind the student residency where it was later burned. An excavation of the former garbage dump from provides an insight of the lifestyle of university students during the 1800s, including goods and products that the students used. The excavation and surface collections continue...

  • Analysis of Mollusks from the Slave Village at Betty’s Hope, Antigua, British West Indies (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434804] Alexis K Ohman.

    Since 2007, excavations at Betty’s Hope plantation have yielded a large amount of faunal material from a variety of contexts on the site: the Great House, Service Quarters, Rum Distillery, and Slave Village. The faunal analysis has begun for the Great House and Service Quarters contexts by focusing on the fish and mollusks in order to ascertain the roles of local vs. nonlocal/imported resources and their incorporation into English foodways at Betty’s Hope. Excavations in the Slave Village began...

  • Analysis of the faunal remains from a 19th century Aku property in Banjul, The Gambia (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434871] Anna E Passaniti.

    During the Summer of 2014, excavations were carried out in Banjul, The Gambia, formerly known as Bathurst, at a 19th century Aku site as part of the Banjul Heritage Project. This paper focuses on the analysis and interpretation of the faunal remains from the site. The Aku ethnic group, formed from a Liberated African population in Bathurst during the colonial period, were a socially, politically, and economically prominent group in colonial Bathurst, often highlighting their Christian, English...

  • An Analysis of Tools from Hanna's Town (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434474] Jay Taylor.

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze tools found at Hanna’s Town to determine the nature of the various tasks performed by its residents, and the town’s economic conditions. This analysis aims to answer these research questions: (1.) What kinds of tools are present at Hanna’s Town and what tasks are they associated with? (2.) Does the spatial arrangement of these artifacts reveal any information about where these tasks took place? (3.) Are there any relationships between these tools that may...

  • Analyzing Nineteenth-Century Steamboat Rudders on Lake Champlain: Using Photogrammetric Modeling to Aid the Archaeological Process (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434537] Dan Bishop. Kotaro Yamafune.

    In June 2014, a team of nautical archaeologists working near Lake Champlain's Shelburne Shipyard discovered two eroded but otherwise intact rudders on the wrecks of the steamboats A. Williams (1870) and Burlington (1837). These two rudders, along with the rudder from the Oakes Ames/Champlain II (1868) (currently on display at the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum) were manually and photogrammetrically recorded during 2014 and 2015 field seasons.This paper will examine the unique characteristics of...

  • ANCHOR Program: Promoting Sustainable Diving on our Nation's Underwater Cultural Heritage (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434353] Kara D Fox.

    This year, Monitor National Marine Sanctuary introduced a new partnership initiative called the ANCHOR program (representing Appreciating the Nation’s Cultural Heritage and Ocean Resources). ANCHOR was developed with the intent of promoting responsible and sustainable diving on North Carolina’s underwater cultural heritage sites. This program, originally established as the "Blue Star" program by the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, is meant to form active partnerships with dive operators,...

  • Anchors Through History: The Case of Lagos, Portugal. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434705] Joana Isabel Palma Baço.

    Historical archaeology research has proven that Lagos bay was a mercantile hub for more than two millennia, with maritime traffic reaching as far as Northern Europe, Mediterranean, Northern Africa, and Egypt. Fishing activity in the bay, is even more ancient than maritime traffic. Our study has located and research a large collection of anchors related to this maritime activity in Lagos. We intend to present a series of typologies, including previously unknown examples and show how these...

  • Animal Husbandry, Hunting, and Fishing on the Lower Cape Fear: Analysis of Colonial and Civil War Era Animal Remains from Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434642] Matthew Compton.

    Recent analyses of animal remains recovered from Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson provide information about the animal use practices of the site’s colonial and Civil War occupants. Colonial materials indicate a pattern similar to animal use observed among eighteenth-century Charleston sites with a heavy reliance on domesticates, particularly cattle, supplemented by estuarine resources. This Charleston pattern has been described as "urban" to contrast it with patterns of animal use observed at...

  • Anona: Historical and Archaeological Evidence of Re-Purposing of an Early 20th Century Steam Yacht. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435060] Robert Westrick. Daniel Warren. Robert Church.

    In 1904, an elegant state-of-the-art steam yacht, Anona, rolled off the ways at George Lawley’s Massachusetts shipyard.  Built for entrepreneur and adventurer Paul J. Rainey, Anona reflected the richness and flamboyance of the pre-World War I era.  Sold to Theodore Buhl in 1907, Anona remained a symbol of the extravagance and privilege of the period.  After Buhl’s death, Anona began a 40-year transition that would change it from a luxury yacht of a rich industrialist to a produce freighter...

  • Antarctic Heritage, Materiality and Narratives (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434880] Maria X Senatore.

    This paper is framed in a broader theoretical discussion on the role that materiality plays in the building of the Master Narratives of Antarctic History. In order to explore the scope of the Antarctic Heritage at present I have studied the following items and the relationships they bear to one another: a) some of the most widely spread versions of the Antarctic History; b) the process for designating Historic Sites and Monuments under the Antarctic Treaty and the characteristics of the...

  • Antebellum and Civil War Landscapes at Sherwood Forest Plantation (44ST615) (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434278] Douglas W. Sanford. Lauren K. McMillan.

    Sherwood Forest Plantation is located just outside Fredericksburg on the Northern Neck of Virginia. The late Antebellum plantation was home to not only the Fitzhugh family who owned the property, but also a large enslaved workforce; additionally, the manor house and the surrounding plantation core served as a hospital to Union troops in 1862-1863. Current research conducted by the University of Mary Washington, in conjunction with and support from Walton International Group, focuses on the...

  • Appalachian Metropolis: Rural and Urban Identities at Company Coal Mining Towns (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434496] Zada Komara.

    Appalachia’s historic company coal towns were unique urban spaces: company-built extraction settlements, which consolidated diverse working families.  Coal mining is integral to Appalachia’s regional identity, yet company towns are seen as transient, quasi-urban phenomena on a fundamentally rural landscape.  This paper aims to: 1.) illuminate Appalachian cities and challenge the construction of Appalachia as a rural region, 2.) complicate the city/country dichotomy and place company coal towns...

  • Approaches to Openness: Digital Archaeology Data in Virginia and Public Engagement (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434418] Jolene Smith.

    Virginia’s archaeological site inventory contains detailed information on nearly 43,000 sites in datasets maintained by the Department of Historic Resources (State Historic Preservation Office). At times, responsibility to protect sensitive sites from looting and vandalism seems to run counter to providing information to the public about Virginia’s archaeology. But the two are not mutually exclusive. This paper will explore Virginia’s historical approach to archaeological data dissemination with...

  • Archaeological Considerations In The Study Of The Anthropocene (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434708] James Gibb. Sarah N. Janesko.

    The Anthropocene epoch, garnering the interest of geologists and environmental scientists for the past decade, has now entered the archaeological lexicon. As in other disciplines, questions remain about what Anthropocene means and when it began, as well as how it differs from the Holocene. This presentation explores some of these issues and offers a ground-up approach by which conventional approaches in archaeology might be adapted to a reassessment of the human experience and the role of...

  • An Archaeological Examination of Cookware from the Storm Wreck, 8SJ5459 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434989] Annie E. Carter.

    The Storm wreck is an 18th-century Loyalist shipwreck located off St. Augustine, Florida. The shipwreck excavation has been an ongoing focus of the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) since 2009. An examination of the iron and copper cookware present on site offers an entryway for the analysis and interpretation of Loyalist intentions and lifeways. These goods were once part of a colonial, capitalistic society and were key items for survival in an intermediary and uncertain time...

  • An Archaeological Exploration of St. Joseph’s College, the First Catholic Boarding School for Boys within the Oregon Territory (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434682] Cayla L. Hill.

    St. Joseph’s College was located within St. Paul, Oregon, the first Roman Catholic mission in the Pacific Northwest. It was established in 1839 by Father Francois Blanchet, four years after the French-Canadian settlers in the area had requested the presence of a Catholic priest. On October 17, 1843, St. Joseph’s College was officially dedicated, becoming the first Catholic boarding school for boys within the Oregon Territory. The school eventually closed in June 1849 due to the mass exodus of...

  • Archaeological Findings From The 2015 Survey of the Tanker SS Dixie Arrow (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434357] Gregory Roach. Frederick Engle. Aaron Hamilton. Tom Edwards. Joseph C Hoyt. Doug Van Kirk.

    Between May 22 – 29, 2015, the Battle of the Atlantic Research and Expedition Group collaborated with NOAA’s Monitor National Marine Sanctuary to survey the wreck of the Dixie Arrow, an American tanker sunk in 1942 by the German submarine U-71.   Over this 7-day period, 13 divers mapped the nearly 500-foot-long contiguous wreck.  This paper will outline the methodology undertaken by the group, the challenges encountered in conducting the survey, and the key archaeological findings from the...

  • The Archaeological Investigation of the Storm Wreck, a Wartime Refugee Vessel Lost at St. Augustine, Florida at the End of the Revolutionary War: Overview of the 2010-2015 Excavation Seasons (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434985] Carolane Veilleaux. Chuck Meide.

    The Storm Wreck, site number 8SJ5459, was discovered in 2009 by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), about a mile offshore St. Augustine, Florida. It has been excavated every year since then in conjunction with LAMP’s underwater archaeology field school. A wide range of artifacts has been recovered, including ordnance, firearms, ship’s equipment, tools and hardware, personal effects, and household items, and are now being conserved at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime...

  • An archaeological light age: On modernity, urbanism and the materiality of light-based technologies. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434498] Hilary Orange.

    Artificial light is synonymous with modernity and the industrial age. Light turns night into day, guides our way, and transforms place and material. Despite its centrality within the urban experience, light studies are fragmented across a diverse set of fields including, among others, architecture, history, planning and art. Where historical and contemporary archaeology are concerned, light and light-based technologies have received little attention. In 2015, the International Year of Light...

  • The Archaeological Potential Of The Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434668] Russell K. Skowronek. Rolando Garza.

    In 2015 the "Rio Grande Valley Civil War Trail" (www.utpa.edu/civilwar-trail ) opened in South Texas. Spearheaded by the Community Historical Archaeology Project with Schools (CHAPS) Program of the University of Texas- Rio Grande Valley with federal, state and local partners it is the only trail in Texas dedicated to the era of the American Civil War.  The trail connects Brownsville on the Gulf of Mexico with Laredo some 200 miles up the Rio Grande.  It includes battlefields, forts, and historic...

  • Archaeological Practice as Science Communication (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434918] Leonor Medeiros.

    For long archaeology has relied on its inherited connections with pop culture and images of adventure and discovery, but as generations pass archaeology has to make a renewed effort to capture the public’s attention and interest. This situation is not exclusive to archaeology and has resulted in a strong investment in science communication in Europe, but our field has remained quite unrepresented on its developments.  Through my experience as national winner of the science competition Famelab,...

  • Archaeological Practice, Material Objects, and Social Memory (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434940] Stephen Silliman.

    This paper attempts to circumvent the dichotomy of remembering/forgetting and instead focuses on the process of slimming down or building up social memory. Such an emphasis attends to the question of not whether something is remembered or forgotten, but the push-and-pull of how it is remembered: the details, valences, politics, pulses, and potency. It also considers archaeology – in its practices and in its objects – firmly within that collective and often national process, not separate from it....

  • An Archaeological Synthesis of Wells in Delaware: Alternative Mitigation for the Polk Tenant Site (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434614] Brian Crane. Christopher Bowen. Dennis Knepper.

    Versar gathered information on 58 previously excavated wells from across Delaware including size, shape, depth, the methods and materials of construction, location, and date among others.  Comparison of data from the sample found patterns in well depth, location, and use of material through time. The results suggest future avenues of research to explore the ways in which well construction might relate to occupant ownership status as well as the temporal evolution of farmsteads. This synthesis...

  • Archaeology and Architecture: How to restore an 18th century manor house at Melwood Parke (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434269] Thomas Bodor. Matthew D. Cochran. Lyle Torp.

    Generally speaking standing structures are most typically the domain of Architects, Structural Engineers, or Architectural Historians.  Recent efforts to stabilize the Melwood Parke, a ca.  c.1715-1767 manor house  located in Prince George’s County, Maryland, highlight the critical role of archaeology in understanding construction chronologies, as well as form and function of colonial American architecture. Topics to be addressed within this paper include: the role archeology can play in the...

  • Archaeology And Gardens At A WWII Japanese American Incarceration Camp In Gila River, Arizona (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434326] Koji Ozawa.

    Violence can be seen in the archaeological record in many different ways, from trauma in the osteological record to depictions in iconography. This paper will focus on reactions to violence.  In World War II, all those of Japanese Ancestry living on the West Coast of the United States were forcibly incarcerated in prison camps. These people reacted to this violent act of imprisonment with many different strategies.  Recent archaeological work has examined the material manifestations of these...

  • Archaeology and Public Memory at the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434395] Matthew R. Laird.

    The discovery and excavation of the Lumpkin’s Slave Jail Site (44HE1053) in Richmond, Virginia, between 2006 and 2009 garnered more media and public attention than any other archaeological project in the city’s history.   Spearheaded by the Richmond City Council’s Slave Trail Commission, the investigations revealed the remarkably well-preserved remains of the slave-trading complex operated by Robert Lumpkin from the 1840s through the fall of Richmond in 1865, and which later served as the site...

  • Archaeology at Bartram’s Garden 1975-Present. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435073] Joel T. Fry.

    Bartram’s Garden, an historic garden and house protected by the City of Philadelphia since 1891, saw little interpretation or visitation for almost a century. The current revival of the site can be credited to intervention by NPS historians, archaeologists, and landscape architects beginning in the 1950s. Professional preservation and conservation advice was coincident with documentary and biographical rediscovery of the Bartrams — particularly the 1955 rediscovery of William Bartram’s sketch of...

  • Archaeology at Paoli Battlefield: Expanding the Interpretations of Conflict (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434675] Matthew A. Kalos.

    On evening of September 20, 1777, and into the morning hours of September 21, British Major General Charles Gray led an elite force of British soldiers on a nighttime bayonet raid on American General Anthony Wayne’s encamped troops. The bloody attack enraged the Patriots, and the battle became engrained in American ideology as the Paoli Massacre.  Although the battle was brief, its national and local importance extends for over 225 years.  Today, archaeology at the Paoli Battlefield seeks to...

  • Archaeology for the Masses: Presenting the Storm Wreck through Public Archaeology (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434988] Olivia A. McDaniel.

    The Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program’s (LAMP) position as the research arm of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum in St. Augustine, Florida, creates the perfect opportunity to extend St. Augustine’s underwater archaeology into the public eye through a series of on-site public archaeology programs. Since the 2009 discovery of the Storm Wreck, a 1782 British Loyalist wreck off the coast of St. Augustine, museum archaeology and education staff have developed a number of...

  • Archaeology in a Revolutionary Town: Multi-Temporal Heritage Narratives at the McGrath Farm, Concord, Massachusetts (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434678] Travis G. Parno. Andrew J. Koh. Sarah Schofield-Mansur.

    The town of Concord, Massachusetts played a critical role in the American Revolutionary War and will forever be linked to this momentous military conflict. While this connection is understandable, Concord has a rich history of indigenous, European, and American life dating back thousands of years. The McGrath Farm site is an excellent example of this complicated and storied past. Once a portion of a farm owned by prominent Revolutionary War figure Col. James Barrett, the McGrath Farm reflects...

  • Archaeology in San Antonio: An Auspicious Paradigm for the Protection of Cultural Resources (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434771] Matthew T. Elverson.

    The City of San Antonio’s Unified Development Code (UDC) contains some of the strongest preservation ordinances in the country for the protection of archaeological resources. In accordance with the UDC, the Office of Historic Preservation (OHP) conducts an archaeological review of new development in the city, specifically within one of the city’s 27 local historic districts, locally designated landmark properties, public property, within the river improvement overlay district. Private...

  • Archaeology In The (Political) Trenches: Lessons From Charm City (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434526] Lauren E Schiszik.

    This paper will cover the rise, fall, and current rise of archaeology in Baltimore. "Charm City" serves as a case-study to explore the political, social, and temporal factors that alter the levels of archaeological stewardship at the local goverment level. The establishment of the Baltimore Center for Urban Archaeology in 1983 marked Baltimore as a forerunner in urban public archaeology. This innovative program led excavations that engaged thousands of people until it closed due to city-wide...

  • Archaeology In The Waters Of The Falls Zone (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434392] Lyle E. Browning.

    Richmond is a Fall Line city. The Falls Zone extends upstream from Tidewater for 7 miles. The second transportation canal in the USA was built to circumvent the falls and to transport international cargo upstream and to transport vital goods downstream for processing. The James River Batteau was invented for riverine transport through the falls. And then there was the activity between the riverbanks. A vibrant multi-racial and multi-ethnic community used the many "rocks, islands and shoals" in...

  • Archaeology is Appealing: Collaborative Approaches to Foster Public Engagement with the Past (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434916] Kari L Lentz. Kate O'Donnell. Stephanie Stewart-Bailey.

    The technology industry is rapidly transforming the social and physical landscape of San Francisco. While the city’s zeitgeist is orientated toward the future, archaeologists labor to recover and record its vanishing history. The enormous scale of construction has resulted in an unprecedented volume of artifacts and data that all too often languish on shelves and in gray literature. Budget crunches and curation crises have led to cooperation with institutions at the forefront of public...

  • The Archaeology of an Early Resource-Extraction Industry: The Cod Fishery, 1600-1713 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434653] Arthur R Clausnitzer Jr.

    As much as popular histories overlook it, the cod fishery of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries brought the first significant numbers of Europeans to North American shores and provided the earliest colonists in the northeast with an economic foundation from which to build new societies. As an industry which was an important staple for two regions the cod fisheries deserve careful study, but it has only been in the last decades that archaeologists and historians have undertaken critical...

  • The Archaeology of Cowboy Island: The Santa Rosa Historic Archaeology Project (SRHAP) (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434779] Courtney H. Buchanan. Amber M Madrid. Brittany N Lucero. Michael McGurk. Jennifer E Perry.

    This paper presents the findings from the first year of a new historic archaeology research project on Santa Rosa Island, one of the five islands of Channel Islands National Park off the coast of southern California. A new, multi-year project dedicated to recording the extant historic structures and sites related to the 19th- and 20th-century ranching complex was started in 2014, instigated by the recent opening of the Santa Rosa Island Research Station. Since May 2014, four CSU Channel Islands...

  • The Archaeology of Enslaved Labor: Identifying Work and Domestic Spaces in the South Yard (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434717] Terry Brock.

    While the domestic lives of enslaved families and communities are a critical element of understanding enslaved life, the majority of each day was spent carrying out work for their masters. Recent excavations at Montpelier have begun to examine structures related to the work of James Madison's domestic slaves. These excavations include work on the extant kitchen and two smokehouses, buildings clearly designed for the support of the Montpelier Mansion. However, the proximity of these structures to...

  • Archaeology of Environmental Inequality (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434439] Sarah E. Cowie.

    The relationships between biopolitics and processes of capitalism and industrialization have come under increasing scrutiny by activists in the environmental justice movement.  Ethnographic studies in modern industrialized (and industrializing) societies demonstrate marked environmental inequality, particularly disadvantageous to racialized groups and working-class communities.  These discriminatory practices have resulted in the disempowerment of marginalized populations, loss of land,...

  • An Archaeology of Homeplace at the Parting Ways, an African-American Settlement in Plymouth, Massachusetts (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434660] Karen A Hutchins.

    The paper will explore how the African-American residents of a late 18th- and 19th-century community called Parting Ways in Plymouth, Massachusetts constructed a homeplace in the years following their emancipation from slavery. Beyond their importance to household productivity, daily practices—for example, cooking, eating meals, taking tea, and household chores—constituted social interactions and exchanges between individuals that fostered a sense of security and strengthened the bonds of...

  • An Archaeology Of Jazz: Urban And Racial Identity At The Blue Bird Inn, Detroit (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434494] C. Lorin Brace VI.

    The postwar period was a transformative time for African American communities in Detroit. Mass migrations of African Americans from the south and shifts in the racial boundaries between neighborhoods led to dramatic changes in the urban makeup of the city. Located at the center of one such neighborhood in Detroit’s Westside was the Blue Bird Inn, one of the most important jazz clubs in the city as well as a social hub for the community. The Blue Bird rose to prominence in the late 1940s with the...

  • Archaeology of Mercantilism: An Analysis of Vessels and Passengers in Puerto Rico, 1510-1545 (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434370] Julissa A. Collazo López.

    This paper presents the preliminary findings of a research project that uses the registries of vessels(Relación de Navíos) from the Royal Treasury of Puerto Rico to study the quantity of people that arrived to the island during the first half of the 16th century, at the height of the Spanish colonization. The main objective of this research is to quantify the passengers and vessels that arrived at the two main ports in Puerto Rico: San Juan and San Germán. The incorporation of this documentary...

  • Archaeology of Pierre Metoyer’s 18th-Century French Colonial Plantation Site, Natchitoches, Louisiana (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434788] Clete Rooney. David Morgan. Kevin C. MacDonald.

    This paper discusses recent findings and interpretations at the 18th century plantation of Pierre Metoyer, a prominent resident of French colonial Louisiana. Metoyer is historically best known for his relationship with Marie-Thérèse Coincoin, a freed slave of African descent living in the Natchitoches area in the 1700s and one of the most important founding ancestors of the regional Creole community. Since 2011 the National Park Service’s Southeast Archeological Center (SEAC) has been assisting...

  • The Archaeology of Playing Indian: Boy Scout Camps as Colonial Imaginaries (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434937] Craig N. Cipolla.

    Over the last 20 years archaeologists have come to pay close attention to the complexities of indigenous agency, cultural continuity and change, and survivance in colonial contexts. In their focus on materiality and everyday life, in their use of multiple lines of evidence, and in their connections to contemporary indigenous communities, archaeologists have the ability to challenge colonial narratives. In contrast, the ways in which these narratives (e.g., notions of savagery, authenticity, and...

  • The Archaeology of Rural Proletarianization in Early Modern Iceland (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434445] Eric D Johnson. Douglas J Bolender.

    Categories such as capitalism, feudalism, peasantry and proletariat obscure more than they elucidate in Early Modern Iceland. The millennium-long occupation of farms in Skagafjörður, Northern Iceland reveals that during the initial settlement of Iceland in the late ninth century, land was freely available, but by the late seventeenth century over 95% of all farming properties were owned by landlords who frequently renegotiated tenant leases. In many ways these insecure tenants resemble...

  • Archaeology of the Czechoslovak Uranium Gulag (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434510] Pavel Vareka.

    Recent research has examined the landscape of the Czechoslovak Uranium Gulag that was established in 1948 according to the Soviet model and under the supervision of Soviet NKVD advisors. The area with the largest concentration of former camps is situated around the historic mining town of Jáchymov (West Bohemia). Nine penal and forced labor camps adjacent to Uranium mines were established in an area of 25 km2 in the late 1940s – early 1950s through which passed c. 60 000 inmates. Research...

  • The Archaeology of Urban Blight (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434501] Kaeleigh Herstad.

    This presentation explores the reconfiguration of urban landscapes in postindustrial cities by discussing how materials removed from blighted neighborhoods in Detroit, Michigan, and Cleveland, Ohio, are reused and resold as tangible heritage (in the form of furniture or personal accessories), often in different parts of the same city. Mapping the transfer and reuse of building materials reveals patterns of urban change and (re)development over time and provides insight into regional...

  • "Archaeology? How Does That Work?" Incorporating Archaeology into the National Park Service LGBTQ Heritage Initiative as Community Engagement (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434590] Megan E. Springate.

    The National Park Service (NPS) Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) Heritage Initiative was established to address the under-representation of LGBTQ sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and as National Historic Landmarks (NHL), as well as to encourage interpretation of LGBTQ history at sites managed by the NPS. An archaeological context was included to facilitate the consideration of properties’ archaeological significance. In practice, the...

  • Archeology and Public Education: Uncovering the Stories of the Virgin Islands National Park (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434582] Ken Wild.

    The Virgin Islands National Park encompasses over half of the island of St. John hundreds of acres of submerged lands, and most of Hassel Island located in the harbor of St. Thomas. Within the park's boundaries are prehistoric sites along every beach, and hundreds of historic structures that make up a complex landscape of archaeological sites that date from the 840 BCE through the 19th century. Sites include over a hundred plantations, fortifications, epidemic hospitals, battlefields, and...

  • Architecural documentation of Ash Lawn Highland: examining the evidence (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434628] Willie Graham.

    Jay Winston Johns restored a small house at Ash Lawn-Highland in the 1930s and created a shrine to James Monroe, the assumed builder and occupant. Now a museum house owned and run by the College of William and Mary, it seemed prudent to determine if the house was actually that which Monroe slept in. If not, the consequence would be profound for the College. The building’s dimensions loosely match a wing of the Monroe dwelling described in documents. Despite the association, many features of the...

  • Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434987] Molly L. Trivelpiece. Chuck Meide.

    During the American Revolution, the British occupied Charleston, South Carolina from their victory at the Siege of Charleston in 1780 until they were forced to flee rebel forces at the end of the war in 1782. The evacuation of Charleston was a massive logistical effort by colonial authorities, involving more than 129 ships gathered from throughout the British Empire. Not only British, Provincial, and German troops were evacuated but thousands of Loyalist families and enslaved Africans, who were...

  • Arctic Steam: HMS Pioneer and the Technology of the Search for Franklin (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434746] Mara A Deckinga.

    In mid-nineteenth century Britain, the dramatic disappearance of Sir John Franklin and his men led to a large-scale search conducted throughout the Arctic by sailing ships and steamers.  The rescue expeditions, conducted over a twelve-year span, highlight the shift from reliance on sail to the prevalence of steam during this period.  HMS Pioneer (formerly the merchant Eider), was built as a topsail schooner with oscillating steam engine, and later outfitted as part of an Arctic squadron.  The...

  • Are We Covered?: The Status of Non-US Navy Vessels Under the Sunken Military Craft Act (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434310] Barry J. Bleichner.

    The Sunken Military Craft Act (SMCA) defines vessels covered under the act as any "sunken warship, naval auxiliary, or other vessel that was owned or operated by a government on military noncommercial service when it sank."   While the definition clearly covers most ships commissioned by the U.S. Navy (USN), the status of non-USN vessels under the SMCA is less certain.  This presentation concentrates on the last class of defined vessels by examining the "owned and operated" and "military...

  • Armed to the Teeth: The Archaeology of Arms Procurement and Use in the Early 19th-Century Gulf of Mexico (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435063] Amy Borgens.

    The first half of the 19th-century was a tumultuous period in the Gulf of Mexico as European and regional powers competed for territorial dominance. As immigration into the northern Gulf of Mexico increased, age-old rivalries erupted while new independent nations emerged. In such a climate, maritime supremacy was essential – foreign and local navies representing every major power were present, new and sometimes ad-hoc navies were created, and privateers capitalized on the unrest - often acting...

  • Artifact Revelations on the Guthrie Homestead (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434793] Clare M Votaw. Brianna Patterson.

    The Guthrie family first came to America from Ireland around 1720 and settled in St. Charles County, Missouri in 1816. The family owned many acres of land, which they passed down through the generations.  Archaeological work on the Guthrie Farmstead commenced due to impending impact on the property for housing development. A cultural resource management company conducted thorough and extensive work on the farmstead, which revealed a homestead site (23SC1041) on the property. The site was a...

  • Artifacts From The Chinese Quarter Of Jacksonville, OR – The Chemical Story (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434331] Kristine Madsen. Elizabeth Harman. Ray von Wandruszka. Chelsea Rose.

    Analytical chemistry is a valuable tool in the identification of historical artifacts for which visual inspection is inconclusive. This is often the case with bottles and jars holding unknown materials, especially when the containers themselves provide little or no evidence. Several of the artifacts recovered from the historical Chinese Quarter of Jacksonville, OR, were of this type. They included a variety of medicine bottles and vials with contents that could only be identified through...

  • Artifacts of Agency, Status, and Empowerment: Colonoware, Crystals, Wig Hair Curlers (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434892] Laura Galke.

    Section 110 archaeological investigations at Manassas National Battlefield Park (MANA) sparked breakthroughs in the recognition of quartz crystal caches and the meaning of colonoware: contributions which continue to shape historical archaeology. These categories of material culture have become emblems for spirited discussions about the dimensions of meaning, identity, and agency. The corpus of work from MANA continues to influence and contribute to understanding multivariate dimensions of...

  • The Artifacts of Outlander: Using Popular Culture to Promote Maryland’s Archaeological Collections (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434255] Caitlin Shaffer. Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory Federal Curator.

    The Maryland Archaeological Conservation Laboratory (MAC Lab) is a State-owned facility serving as the primary repository for collections excavated in Maryland. Artifacts come to the MAC Lab from every part of the state, and while the estimated 8.5 million objects in our collections are regularly used by researchers and school groups, our broken bits of "stuff" are less of a draw for the general public. This paper discusses how the MAC Lab staff turned their love of Outlander, a popular...

  • "As Long As I Have Served, I Have Not Yet Left A Battlefield In Such Deep Sorrow…": Archeology, History And The Material Remains Of Fort Mercer, Red Bank, New Jersey (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434273] Kevin C Bradley. Meagan Ratini. Elisabeth A. LaVigne. Kathryn Wood. Wade Catts.

    Nearly a month after the Crown Forces captured Philadelphia, a Hessian Brigade under the command of Colonel von Donop crossed the Delaware River intent on clearing away the American defenses entrenched along its east bank. Captain Ewald was part of the expedition, and his jaegers supported the attack on Fort Mercer at Red Bank, New Jersey. The assault on the earthen fortification began in the late afternoon on October 22, 1777. The Hessian force suffered heavy casualties at the hands of a...

  • The Ash Grove Meaathouse: Public Archaeology and Preservation at a Fairfax Family Property (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434813] Christopher Sperling.

    The Fairfaxx County (Virginia) Park Authority mission statement specifies the, "…protection and enhancement of…, cultural heritage to guarantee that these resources will be available to both present and future generations." When staff preservationists identified the need to stabilize a historic meathouselocated at an eighteenth century house site built by a member of the county’s namesake family, it presented the opportunity to demonstrate commitment to this mission.  In order to stabilize the...

  • Asian Export Porcelain at the New York City Archaeological Repository (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434632] Sarah Kautz.

    This paper explores how a detailed analysis of Asian export porcelain at the New York City Archaeological Repository may enrich our understanding of the city's archaeology.  For example, dates based on stylistic and technical characteristics of Asian export porcelain may refine the dating of archaeological contexts based on other lines of evidence.  New York City's development as a global entrepot may also be further elucidated by identifying and comparing the points of origin and maritime...

  • Ask the Archaeologists: Mount Clare Archaeology Past and Future (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434521] Teresa Moyer.

    Archaeology took place at Mount Clare, a former plantation the remnants of which sit in Carroll Park in southwestern Baltimore, beginning in the 1970s. It not only shaped the story told at the site, but influenced many archaeologists' careers. In 2014, Baltimore City reclaimed the archaeological collection. This historic moment provides archaeologists with an opportunity to reflect on their time with the Mount Clare sites and collections. It is also a moment to propose new ways of using the old...

  • Asking New Questions of Old Collections, The Future of Curated Assemblages. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434809] LisaMarie Malischke.

    Part of the future of Historical Archaeology is the re-examination of existing collections by applying new research questions. An example of this is Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729), where a productive fourth year of excavations in the 1970s went unpublished. In re-examining the whole artifact assemblage with its associated architectural features, I gathered new information regarding daily life at the fort. Using an ethnohistorical approach I constructed the political situation that surrounded the...

  • At Home in the City: reflections on theoretical and methodological approaches to contemporary homeless heritage (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434492] Rachael R M Kiddey.

    The Homeless Heritage project (2009-2013) was a collaborative public archaeology project that sought to document contemporary homelessness from the perspective of homeless people in two British cities, Bristol and York. This paper draws on case studies from the Homeless Heritage project and expands upon a paper given at SHA 2013 (Leicester) when fieldwork was in its concluding phase. Three years on, this paper reflects upon the theoretical and methodological challenges that were present and...

  • "At Rest," the Pima Lodge 10, Improved Order of Red Men Cemetery Plot in Tucson, Arizona. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434245] J. Homer Thiel. Jeremy Pye.

    The Improved Order of Red Men opened a lodge in Tucson, Arizona Territory in 1898. Here, members of the fraternal group held meetings featuring songs and speeches, and marched in parades dressed in Native American attire. The lodge purchased a cemetery plot and, from 1898 to 1908, 20 graves were dug. Archaeological excavation of the eastern cluster of graves yielded nine burials, two complete and seven exhumed in 1915. Each grave contained human remains, clothing, coffins, and outer boxes....

  • "At this point there was terrible firing, and half of the Englishmen...were slain": The Rearguard Action at the Battle of Brandywine, 11 September 1777 - A comparative dialogic of Captain Ewald's battlefield experience as a function of terrain analysis in battlefield study bridging the semantic and the semiotic of a battlespace. (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434275] kevin michael donaghy.

    DRAFT    "At this point there was terrible firing, and half of the Englishmen...were slain": The Rearguard Action at the Battle of Brandywine, 11 September 1777     kevin m. donaghy Temple University Department of Anthropology   ABSTRACT   Battlefield Archaeology has gained new energy in part due to: advances in remote sensing and data management, improved access to primary documents and GIS technologies.  A question arises of whether we can improve our battlefield modeling based on military...

  • The Aura of Things: Locating Authenticity and the Power of Objects (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 435091] Benjamin Skolnik.

    This paper is about authenticity and the aura, the authority and power of the physical object, historicity and the persistence of the past, and alternatives to scientific archaeology.  It is about science fiction, 20th century theorists, 21st century technology, and contemporary landscapes.  This paper examines concepts of authenticity and reproduction and how material culture is used in Philip K. Dick’s Hugo award-winning 1962 novel "The Man in the High Castle" as well as in Walter Benjamin’s...

  • Balancing with Guns: Establishing an Integrated Conservation Priority for Artillery from Site 31CR314, Queen Anne’s Revenge (1718) (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434712] Erik R Farrell.

    Among the artifacts from the wreck of Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR), the artillery represents a particularly evocative and informative subset. Conserving a cannon protects the object, reveals archaeological information, and allows for impressive museum displays for public education. However, the conservation of an individual cannon represents one of the largest single-object expenditures of time and materials of any subset of QAR artifacts. These expenditures must be prioritized within the ongoing...

  • Bang Bang! Cannons, Carronades, and the Gun Carriage from the Storm Wreck (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434984] Chuck T Meide.

    The Storm Wreck, one of sixteen Loyalist refugee ships from Charleston lost on the St. Augustine Bar on 31 December 1782, has been excavated for six seasons, 2010-2015. In December 2010, a pile of four 4-pdr cannons and two 9-pdr carronades was encountered on the wreck site, where they were seemingly jettisoned in an attempt to refloat the ship after it grounded. Two of these guns were raised in 2011 for conservation and display. The carronade, whose serial number has been found in Carron...

  • The Battle of the Wabash and The Battle of Fort Recovery: GIS Data Modeling and Landscape Analysis (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434836] Christine Thompson.

    Ball State University’s Department of Anthropology has completed five years of archaeological and historical research at the battlefield of the Battle of the Wabash (1791) and the Battle of Fort Recovery (1794), two significant Northwest Indian War battles that took place in present day Fort Recovery, Ohio.  This research was funded by multiple National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program grants and additional university funding. This poster will present the results of this...

  • Battlespace: Battlefield Archaeological Applications of Modern Strategic Training Models (2016)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434399] Douglas Scott.

    As conflict archaeologists have developed techniques for documenting where and how battles took place, battlefield research has moved from documentation and description of past warfare to behavioral and experience assessment of those who were involved. To understand the actions of combatants, archaeologists need conceptual tools that can explain the physical record of conflict. Battlespace is a conceptual tool that has the potential to aid in that explanation. As presented in modern military...

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