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The Archaeology of Enslaved Labor: Identifying Work and Domestic Spaces in the South Yard

Author(s): Terry Brock

Year: 2016

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Summary

While the domestic lives of enslaved families and communities are a critical element of understanding enslaved life, the majority of each day was spent carrying out work for their masters. Recent excavations at Montpelier have begun to examine structures related to the work of James Madison's domestic slaves. These excavations include work on the extant kitchen and two smokehouses, buildings clearly designed for the support of the Montpelier Mansion. However, the proximity of these structures to three duplex slave quarters raises questions about the boundaries of space dedicated to the work and domestic lives of the enslaved. By using the material and historical record to identify activity areas around these structures, this paper will begin examining the way in which these spaces of work were used and reused by the enslaved communities that lived near them.


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The Archaeology of Enslaved Labor: Identifying Work and Domestic Spaces in the South Yard. Terry Brock. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434717)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 443

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America