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An Archaeology of Homeplace at the Parting Ways, an African-American Settlement in Plymouth, Massachusetts

Author(s): Karen A Hutchins

Year: 2016

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Summary

The paper will explore how the African-American residents of a late 18th- and 19th-century community called Parting Ways in Plymouth, Massachusetts constructed a homeplace in the years following their emancipation from slavery. Beyond their importance to household productivity, daily practices—for example, cooking, eating meals, taking tea, and household chores—constituted social interactions and exchanges between individuals that fostered a sense of security and strengthened the bonds of family, friendship, and community, and were the means through which the homeplace was built and given meaning to those who experienced it. This paper presents an archaeology of the homeplace at Parting Ways that links these quotidian practices to the creation of meaningful spaces for individual families and the local African-American community.


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An Archaeology of Homeplace at the Parting Ways, an African-American Settlement in Plymouth, Massachusetts. Karen A Hutchins. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434660)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 93

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America