tDAR Logo tDAR digital antiquity

Armed to the Teeth: The Archaeology of Arms Procurement and Use in the Early 19th-Century Gulf of Mexico

Author(s): Amy Borgens

Year: 2016

» Downloads & Basic Metadata

Summary

The first half of the 19th-century was a tumultuous period in the Gulf of Mexico as European and regional powers competed for territorial dominance. As immigration into the northern Gulf of Mexico increased, age-old rivalries erupted while new independent nations emerged. In such a climate, maritime supremacy was essential – foreign and local navies representing every major power were present, new and sometimes ad-hoc navies were created, and privateers capitalized on the unrest - often acting in concert with revolutionary factions. Within this diverse arena, three archeological sites off Texas and Louisiana have been investigated in the past two decades that contain arms and/or artillery. The artifacts from the Pass Cavallo Shipwreck, discovered in 1998, are reassessed in comparison with more contemporary discoveries that collectively help develop a broader understanding of these regional marine-based assemblage types and allude to the dynamic character of the period.


This Resource is Part of the Following Collections


Cite this Record

Armed to the Teeth: The Archaeology of Arms Procurement and Use in the Early 19th-Century Gulf of Mexico. Amy Borgens. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 435063)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
1800-1850


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 774

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America