Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck

Author(s): Molly L. Trivelpiece; Chuck Meide

Year: 2016

Summary

During the American Revolution, the British occupied Charleston, South Carolina from their victory at the Siege of Charleston in 1780 until they were forced to flee rebel forces at the end of the war in 1782. The evacuation of Charleston was a massive logistical effort by colonial authorities, involving more than 129 ships gathered from throughout the British Empire. Not only British, Provincial, and German troops were evacuated but thousands of Loyalist families and enslaved Africans, who were transported to various other locales in Canada, England, the Caribbean, and East Florida. One of the ships carrying Loyalists and their possessions, along with some military hardware, ended up wrecking on the notorious St. Augustine Bar, and is now known as the Storm Wreck. This paper provides a historical background of the evacuation and shipwreck as compiled from primary documents analyzed by LAMP researchers in various depositories in Britain and the U.S.

Cite this Record

Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck. Molly L. Trivelpiece, Chuck Meide. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434987)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 801