Florida (Other Keyword)

1-25 (58 Records)

3D Printing an Archaeological Site Map: Photogrammetric Recording and Printing of the Pillar Dollar Wreck (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne E. Wright.

During the 2016 East Carolina University field school at Biscayne National Park, photogrammetric data was collected to 3D print a sitemap using a ZCorp 3D printer. This printer is a resin-based printer that uses a 24-bit color pallet to print a full range of color. In addition to Photoscan, this process utilizes a free, open-source 3D rendering and animation software called Blender to perfect  and render the model usable for 3D printing software. The sitemap was then 3D printed for use in the...


Archaeological Collections at the University of West Florida (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Elizabeth Benchley. Norine Carroll.

The Archaeology Institute at the University of West Florida in Pensacola includes a regional archaeological museum and curation facility. Approximately 450 archeological collections and associated project archives from terrestrial and underwater sites are available to researchers and students. Projects conducted by the Institute along the northern Gulf Coast since the 1980s, and more recently by the Department of Anthropology, include Prehistoric through Industrial era archaeological sites...


The Archaeological Investigation of the Storm Wreck, a Wartime Refugee Vessel Lost at St. Augustine, Florida at the End of the Revolutionary War: Overview of the 2010-2015 Excavation Seasons (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolane Veilleaux. Chuck Meide.

The Storm Wreck, site number 8SJ5459, was discovered in 2009 by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), about a mile offshore St. Augustine, Florida. It has been excavated every year since then in conjunction with LAMP’s underwater archaeology field school. A wide range of artifacts has been recovered, including ordnance, firearms, ship’s equipment, tools and hardware, personal effects, and household items, and are now being conserved at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime...


Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Molly L. Trivelpiece. Chuck Meide.

During the American Revolution, the British occupied Charleston, South Carolina from their victory at the Siege of Charleston in 1780 until they were forced to flee rebel forces at the end of the war in 1782. The evacuation of Charleston was a massive logistical effort by colonial authorities, involving more than 129 ships gathered from throughout the British Empire. Not only British, Provincial, and German troops were evacuated but thousands of Loyalist families and enslaved Africans, who were...


Bang Bang! Cannons, Carronades, and the Gun Carriage from the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chuck T Meide.

The Storm Wreck, one of sixteen Loyalist refugee ships from Charleston lost on the St. Augustine Bar on 31 December 1782, has been excavated for six seasons, 2010-2015. In December 2010, a pile of four 4-pdr cannons and two 9-pdr carronades was encountered on the wreck site, where they were seemingly jettisoned in an attempt to refloat the ship after it grounded. Two of these guns were raised in 2011 for conservation and display. The carronade, whose serial number has been found in Carron...


Beings from the Third Dimension: Imaging Weeden Island Effigies (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Donop.

The use of 3-D imaging enhances the ability of archaeologists to record and analyze artifacts for both public and academic purposes. This study used 3-D imaging to scan a sample of ceramic artifacts collected by Decatur Pittman in the 1880s from the Palmetto Mound (8LV2) mortuary facility on the Florida Gulf Coast housed at the Florida Museum of Natural History (FLMNH). This collection consists primarily of Woodland Period (AD 200-1000) Weeden Island ceramics that include large portions of...


The Best Days at FPAN are Shared with Others: The Various Partnerships FPAN had Developed Over the Years (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Barbara Clark.

Since its inception, the Florida Public Archaeology Network has relied on partnerships with other organizations to help meet our goal of public awareness and education. Throughout the years we have partnered with various organizations to offer training, workshops, youth and adult programs and other opportunities for the public to learn about Florida’s archaeological heritage. Each of these partnerships is unique and bring with them their own challenges and successes. This paper will discuss some...


Beyond the Dirt: Protecting the Council Oak (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tiffany Cochran.

This presentation examines one unique project in which archaeologists from the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s (STOF) Tribal Historic Preservation Office act as caretakers of a living artifact; the Seminole Tribe’s Council Oak tree in Hollywood, Florida. The Council Oak evolved from a convenient shady spot for meetings to one of the most important cultural symbols of the Tribe today. Tribal archaeologists, despite a lack of experience in arboriculture, must face challenges such as natural...


Bones, Beads, and Birds: Determining cultural affiliation of skeletal remains and artifacts from Casuarina Mound, Brevard County, FL (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ryan McRae. Gary Aronsen. Erin Gredell.

Efforts to repatriate Native American human remains and artifacts are of immediate importance to American archaeology. Excavated in the early 20th century, Casuarina Mound (8-Br-0122) was first dated to the Malabar II period (750-1565CE) by Irving Rouse in his 1951 publication A Survey of Indian River Archaeology, Florida. Historical accounts describe the removal of at least 112 skeletons and numerous funerary objects from three successive interments. A small subset of this material was donated...


CLAASP: A Public Archaeology Initiative To Preserve Archaeological Information In Central Florida (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin Gidusko. Rachael Kangas. Kassie Kemp. Nigel Rudolph.

The Communities of Lake Apopka Artifact Survey Project (CLAASP) is an attempt by several regions within the Florida Public Archaeological Network (FPAN) to preserve information about the many unprovenienced collections of artifacts hailing from this area in Central Florida. Relative to several other areas in the state, the Lake Apopka region is under-represented in the archaeological record. This is in part due to the long term use of much of this area for agriculture prior to the creation of...


Collaboration in Progress: FPAN Central Regional Center and the Florida Park Service. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nigel Rudolph. Jeff Moates.

Among the many places that the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) uses as a base of operation, the relationship the Central Region has with the Crystal River Archaeological State Parks is unlike any other. Housed within the visitor’s center at the Crystal River Preserve State Park, FPAN’s Central Region is the only regional center located at a National Historic Landmark prehistoric mound complex. This provides the center with a unique opportunity for outreach, education, and promotion of...


Confronting Confederate Narratives: Archaeology at the Judah P. Benjamin Confederate Memorial at Gamble Plantation Historic State Park (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Diane Wallman. Matt Litteral.

In recent years, the southern United States has experienced a growing movement to remove confederate memorials from public spaces. These efforts have initiated a dialogue about representations of heritage, and the ethics of memorialization. Arguments for the removal of these memorials and monuments maintain that they misrepresent the past, and minimize the suffering of enslaved people and their descendants. Gamble Plantation was one of several sugar plantations established along the Manatee...


Devil’s Den (8LV84), Florida: Rare Earth Element (REE) Analysis Suggests Comtemporaneity Between Late Pleistocene Fauna and Human Skeletal Material (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Barbara Purdy. Kathryn Rohlwing. Bruce MacFadden.

In the early 1960s, human remains of several individuals were found in association with late Pleistocene mammals during an excavation at Devil’s Den sinkhole in Levy County, Florida. The rarity of this occurrence in Florida and across the Americas is well-known. Very little has been published about the Devil’s Den site, and the human remains were not available for study until 2003. Neither the human or animals bones can be dated by the radiocarbon method due to a lack of sufficient surviving...


Discovered Repeatedly: A "Newcomers" Archeological Evaluation of Pacific Reef Wreck (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Madeline J. Roth.

Home to over one hundred submerged archeological sites, Biscayne National Park sits at the northern end of the Florida Reef. As part of the Park’s ongoing efforts to study, interpret, and stabilize submerged resources threatened by intensified storm activity and looting, National Park Service personnel excavated the remains of a mid-nineteenth century composite ship during the summer of 2016. Colloquially termed "Pacific Reef Wreck" by treasure hunter Marty Meylach, the site has been the target...


Diving into the PAST: Developing a Public Engagement Program for Pensacola’s Emanuel Point Shipwrecks (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Nicole Grinnan. Della A Scott-Ireton.

Remnants of Spain’s failed attempt to settle modern-day Pensacola in 1559, the Emanuel Point shipwrecks are legacies of Florida’s long colonial history. Community interest in the sites has been profound since the discovery of the Emanuel Point I wreck in 1992, but challenging dive conditions have limited opportunities for public access. After award of a grant to explore Emanuel Point II in 2014, the University of West Florida (UWF) Division of Anthropology and Archaeology began considering new...


The Ekanachattee Trading Post in the Choctawhatchee River (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ivor R. Mollema.

In March 2017, we received a call from a local property owner and archaeologist suggesting that they may have located an old Anglo-Native American Trading Post in the eastern edges of Chocctawhatchee Bay in Florida. While this part of the bay had never before been surveyed, the proximity of previously identified sites and historical research suggested that this was a likely location for the maritime end of the Ekanachattee Trading Trail from Florida's British Period. During the following months,...


The Elusive Fort Shackelford: The Brief Life and Long Legacy of a Lost Seminole War Fort (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David W Scheidecker.

Secluded within a remote cattle pasture on the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation sits a concrete marker from the 1940’s declaring it to be the location of Fort Shackelford, a US Army outpost built in 1855 during the prelude to the Third Seminole war. Investigations to verify the location however turned up a complex history. Historical research not only cast doubt on the marker’s accuracy, but revealed a cautionary tale of misinformation, looting, site tampering, and tribal sovereignty. Now,...


Emergence of Place: the Great Circle of Fort Center, Glades County, Florida (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Colvin.

In South Florida, earthen enclosures represent some of the earliest and largest communal monuments. At around 300 meters in diameter, Fort Center in Glades County, Florida contains one of the largest enclosures in the entire Southeast. As the earliest recorded earthwork at Fort Center, I argue the construction of the Great Circle acts as a trigger and anchor for coalescence and the establishment of place. Since this event occurs during a period of long term fisher-hunter-gatherer practices,...


Episodic Habitation in an Eolian Environment, 1350 B.C. - A.D. 900, Useppa Island, Coastal Southwest Florida (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Walker. William Marquardt. Arianne Boileau. Ann Cordell. Donna Ruhl.

Excavations (2012) on southwest Florida’s subtropical Useppa Island revealed a stratigraphic sequence of alternating eolian-sand and shell-midden layers, mostly dating from 1350 to 1000 B.C., with the highest midden dating to A.D. 900. Predictably, the Late Archaic artifact assemblages (pottery, shell artifacts, etc.) differ greatly from the younger Caloosahatchee IIB one. However, surprisingly the invertebrate faunal assemblages also differ. And there is a general dearth of fish remains in the...


Expanding KOCOA’s Potential: The Role of a West Point Military Academy Education on the Second Seminole War Florida (1835-1842) (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle D. Sivilich.

The field of conflict archaeology has begun embracing KOCOA as a regular part of battlefield analysis. However, I argue KOCOA can be further expanded to include indirect expressions of warfare and incorporate them into a meaningful discussion of their role in the outcome of conflict. To accomplish this, I develop a model that allows for the investigation of hypotheses about decision-making processes and their effectiveness using the Second Seminole War (1835-1842) in Florida as a case study. In...


Finding Fort Shackelford: A lost U.S. Army Fort from the Seminole War Era. (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shawn P Keyte.

Fort Shackelford was built in February of 1855 on what is now the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation in South Florida. It was one of several forts built by the U.S. Army used to scout near the Big Cypress and Everglades regions during the U.S. Government’s efforts to pressure the Seminoles into leaving the area. The fort was found burned by American Soldiers shortly before they were ambushed by Seminole Warriors; marking the start of the Third Seminole War. The location of the fort has been...


Fort Caroline’s Legacy: surveying for a missing fort (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Thunen.

This paper summarizes the history and archaeology of Fort Caroline, a French outpost established in North Florida in 1564, then captured and occupied by the Spanish who renamed it Fort San Mateo. To date only one French artifact has been identifed for the 16th century time period and it was recovered from a dredge spoil pile along the river. Several archaeological surveys have been undertaken both within National Park property and on adjacent private property along the south bank of the St....


A Generous Spirit (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael Harris.

This paper offers a reflection on Jerry Kennedy’s manifold contributions to the Department of Anthropology at Florida Atlantic University and their continuing influence a decade past his retirement. These contributions include his work on the archaeology of south Florida and elsewhere, the training of students at both undergraduate and graduate levels, the creation of programs, and the lending of his administrative acumen to department causes. Jerry’s work as an archaeologist has been...


Giving 3D Scanning a Porpoise: Digitizing the Zooarchaeological Type Collection at the University of West Florida (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kristina Killgrove. Mariana Zechini.

The faunal type collection at the University of West Florida’s Department of Anthropology, used for zooarchaeological reference, is composed primarily of specimens of local fauna donated by students, staff, and faculty. These crowdsourced contributions are stored in a lab facility and therefore are not readily available to archaeologists needing to make IDs in the field or to researchers working from afar. Using the department’s NextEngine Desktop 3D scanner and hand-held Sense 3D scanner, we...


Gone for a Soldier: An Archaeological Signature of a Military Presence aboard the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian J. McNamara.

Six seasons of excavation have yielded numerous artifacts from the Storm Wreck, site 8SJ 8459, a ship that wrecked off St. Augustine on 31 December 1782 as part of the Loyalist evacuation fleet from Charleston, South Carolina. Many of these artifacts reflect the presence of military personnel amongst the ship’s passenger grouping. These include Brown Bess muskets and diagnostic regimental uniform buttons, which spurred archival research in England and Scotland that has led to a better...