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American Revolution, Late 18th Century (Temporal Keyword)

1-14 (14 Records)

An Archaeological Examination of Cookware from the Storm Wreck, 8SJ5459 (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434989] Annie E. Carter.

The Storm wreck is an 18th-century Loyalist shipwreck located off St. Augustine, Florida. The shipwreck excavation has been an ongoing focus of the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) since 2009. An examination of the iron and copper cookware present on site offers an entryway for the analysis and interpretation of Loyalist intentions and lifeways. These goods were once part of a colonial, capitalistic society and were key items for survival in an intermediary and uncertain time...


The Archaeological Investigation of the Storm Wreck, a Wartime Refugee Vessel Lost at St. Augustine, Florida at the End of the Revolutionary War: Overview of the 2010-2015 Excavation Seasons (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434985] Carolane Veilleaux. Chuck Meide.

The Storm Wreck, site number 8SJ5459, was discovered in 2009 by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), about a mile offshore St. Augustine, Florida. It has been excavated every year since then in conjunction with LAMP’s underwater archaeology field school. A wide range of artifacts has been recovered, including ordnance, firearms, ship’s equipment, tools and hardware, personal effects, and household items, and are now being conserved at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime...


Archaeology for the Masses: Presenting the Storm Wreck through Public Archaeology (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434988] Olivia A. McDaniel.

The Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program’s (LAMP) position as the research arm of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum in St. Augustine, Florida, creates the perfect opportunity to extend St. Augustine’s underwater archaeology into the public eye through a series of on-site public archaeology programs. Since the 2009 discovery of the Storm Wreck, a 1782 British Loyalist wreck off the coast of St. Augustine, museum archaeology and education staff have developed a number of...


Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434987] Molly L. Trivelpiece. Chuck Meide.

During the American Revolution, the British occupied Charleston, South Carolina from their victory at the Siege of Charleston in 1780 until they were forced to flee rebel forces at the end of the war in 1782. The evacuation of Charleston was a massive logistical effort by colonial authorities, involving more than 129 ships gathered from throughout the British Empire. Not only British, Provincial, and German troops were evacuated but thousands of Loyalist families and enslaved Africans, who were...


Bang Bang! Cannons, Carronades, and the Gun Carriage from the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434984] Chuck T Meide.

The Storm Wreck, one of sixteen Loyalist refugee ships from Charleston lost on the St. Augustine Bar on 31 December 1782, has been excavated for six seasons, 2010-2015. In December 2010, a pile of four 4-pdr cannons and two 9-pdr carronades was encountered on the wreck site, where they were seemingly jettisoned in an attempt to refloat the ship after it grounded. Two of these guns were raised in 2011 for conservation and display. The carronade, whose serial number has been found in Carron...


Gone for a Soldier: An Archaeological Signature of a Military Presence aboard the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434990] Brian J. McNamara.

Six seasons of excavation have yielded numerous artifacts from the Storm Wreck, site 8SJ 8459, a ship that wrecked off St. Augustine on 31 December 1782 as part of the Loyalist evacuation fleet from Charleston, South Carolina. Many of these artifacts reflect the presence of military personnel amongst the ship’s passenger grouping. These include Brown Bess muskets and diagnostic regimental uniform buttons, which spurred archival research in England and Scotland that has led to a better...


Household Artifacts from the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434997] Christopher McCarron.

When Loyalist families evacuated Charleston, South Carolina in December 1782, they carried with them all they could bring from their homes. Domestic artifacts recovered from the Storm Wreck include pewter spoons and plates, a glass stopper, ceramics associated with tea consumption, a variety of iron and copper cookware, fireplace hardware, clothing irons, straight pins, padlocks and keys, furniture hardware, a candlestick, and a door lock stripped from an abandoned home, wrapped in course cloth...


Life Among the Wind and Waves: Examining Living Conditions on Sailing Vessels Through the Use of Microscopic Remains (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434998] Jacob D Shidner.

In the summer of 2015, sediment samples were collected from the Storm Wreck, a colonial-era sailing vessel that wrecked off the coast of Florida, with the expectation of recovering microscopic remains that would provide insight into the lives of those aboard the vessel.  Sediment samples collected from the Emanuel Point wrecks, also located on the Florida coast, were previously analyzed. This material, which consisted of insect remains, animal bones, and botanical remains painted a picture of...


Navigational Instruments found on the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434996] Maggie Burkett.

Between 2009 and 2015, excavations of the Storm Wreck (8SJ5459), a late 18th-century British shipwreck off the coast of St. Augustine, Florida by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) has revealed a variety of navigational instruments and components of such instruments. The primary navigational instruments discussed in this paper are a pair of navigational dividers, an octant, and a mathematical device known as a sector rule. This paper presents a historical analysis of each...


Pew Pew! Small Arms from the Storm Wreck, a Loyalist Evacuation Ship from the End of the American Revolutionary War. (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434986] Starr N Cox.

On or just after 31 December 1782, sixteen ships from a larger fleet evacuating Charleston, South Carolina wrecked while attempting to enter the St. Augustine Inlet. One of these sixteen ships, the Storm Wreck, has been the focus of six seasons of excavation for the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), the research arm of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum. The firearms recovered from the shipwreck include three Brown Bess muskets, two of which were loaded and in the...


Ship’s Equipment, Fittings, and Rigging Components from the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434993] Eden Andes.

This paper addresses ship’s equipment, fittings, and rigging found on the late 18th century Storm Wreck off the coast of St. Augustine, Florida. Components of standing and running rigging are discussed along with the ship’s bell, lead deck pump, bricks, fasteners, and ballast. Rigging components recovered include an intact deadeye with iron stropping, another deadeye strop, a possible chainplate, and a variety of iron hooks and hanks. The lead deck pump was found bent and hacked from its...


Taking it Personally: Personal Items from the Storm Wreck (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434992] Hunter L. Brendel.

The Storm Wreck, a Loyalist refugee vessel fleeing Charleston near the end of the American Revolution in 1782, was discovered by LAMP in 2009. Since 2010, a systematic excavation of the shipwreck has been ongoing, aiming at documenting, recovering, and conserving diagnostic artifacts to further understand this shipwreck and its role in Florida’s Loyalist influx, a time of civil conflict and rapidly increasing population. This paper will review artifacts from the shipwreck categorized as personal...


Weight, Weight . . . Don’t Tell Me: the Assemblage of Weights from the Storm Wreck. (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434994] Andrew Thomson.

The Storm Wreck was a British refugee vessel that ran aground off St. Augustine 31 December 1782. As part of the evacuation fleet of Charleston, South Carolina, it was responsible for transporting the Loyalist population and their goods necessary to begin life again in East Florida. An unassuming assemblage of artifacts from the excavation can help elucidate aspects of the refugees’ lives, their thought process during the evacuation, life aboard the ship, and the eventual wrecking event. A wide...


Wrecked! An Interactive Exhibition on a Revolutionary War Shipwreck in St. Augustine, Florida (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434995] Brenda Swann.

The upcoming exhibition of the Storm Wreck, a Revolutionary War shipwreck in St. Augustine, Florida, is two-fold. As with traditional archaeology exhibits, it will share how historical documents and artifacts from the shipwreck tell the story of British Loyalists who, after evacuating Charleston, South Carolina and leaving behind all they knew and taking with them only what they treasured and needed most, arrived in St. Augustine only to run aground and have many of their precious few items...

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America