St. Augustine (Other Keyword)

1-17 (17 Records)

An Archaeological Examination of Cookware from the Storm Wreck, 8SJ5459 (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Annie E. Carter.

The Storm wreck is an 18th-century Loyalist shipwreck located off St. Augustine, Florida. The shipwreck excavation has been an ongoing focus of the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) since 2009. An examination of the iron and copper cookware present on site offers an entryway for the analysis and interpretation of Loyalist intentions and lifeways. These goods were once part of a colonial, capitalistic society and were key items for survival in an intermediary and uncertain time...


The Archaeological Investigation of the Storm Wreck, a Wartime Refugee Vessel Lost at St. Augustine, Florida at the End of the Revolutionary War: Overview of the 2010-2015 Excavation Seasons (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolane Veilleaux. Chuck Meide.

The Storm Wreck, site number 8SJ5459, was discovered in 2009 by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), about a mile offshore St. Augustine, Florida. It has been excavated every year since then in conjunction with LAMP’s underwater archaeology field school. A wide range of artifacts has been recovered, including ordnance, firearms, ship’s equipment, tools and hardware, personal effects, and household items, and are now being conserved at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime...


Archival Research and the Historical Background of the 1782 Evacuation of Charleston and the Loss of the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Molly L. Trivelpiece. Chuck Meide.

During the American Revolution, the British occupied Charleston, South Carolina from their victory at the Siege of Charleston in 1780 until they were forced to flee rebel forces at the end of the war in 1782. The evacuation of Charleston was a massive logistical effort by colonial authorities, involving more than 129 ships gathered from throughout the British Empire. Not only British, Provincial, and German troops were evacuated but thousands of Loyalist families and enslaved Africans, who were...


Bang Bang! Cannons, Carronades, and the Gun Carriage from the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chuck T Meide.

The Storm Wreck, one of sixteen Loyalist refugee ships from Charleston lost on the St. Augustine Bar on 31 December 1782, has been excavated for six seasons, 2010-2015. In December 2010, a pile of four 4-pdr cannons and two 9-pdr carronades was encountered on the wreck site, where they were seemingly jettisoned in an attempt to refloat the ship after it grounded. Two of these guns were raised in 2011 for conservation and display. The carronade, whose serial number has been found in Carron...


Comparative Analysis of the Ceramic Assemblage from the Anniversary Wreck, St. Augustine, Florida (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel P Turner. Chuck Meide. Allyson Ropp.

The Anniversary Wreck was discovered in 2015, the 450th anniversary of the founding of St. Augustine, Florida. Preliminary analysis of the material recovered dates the site between 1750 and 1800. A closer examination of the ceramic assemblage and a comparison to terrestrial ceramic assemblages from St. Augustine are used to attempt to accurately place the shipwreck within the prevailing historical divisions of Florida’s History that span the years 1750 to 1800, that is, the late First Spanish...


Gone for a Soldier: An Archaeological Signature of a Military Presence aboard the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian J. McNamara.

Six seasons of excavation have yielded numerous artifacts from the Storm Wreck, site 8SJ 8459, a ship that wrecked off St. Augustine on 31 December 1782 as part of the Loyalist evacuation fleet from Charleston, South Carolina. Many of these artifacts reflect the presence of military personnel amongst the ship’s passenger grouping. These include Brown Bess muskets and diagnostic regimental uniform buttons, which spurred archival research in England and Scotland that has led to a better...


Happy Anniversary! We didn't get a card but we found a lot of ship: Revisiting the Anniversary Wreck. (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Silvana C Kreines. Chuck T Meide.

This is an abstract from the "Current Research in Maritime Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In July 2015, during the city’s 450th anniversary celebration, a buried shipwreck was discovered off St. Augustine, Florida by the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program, or LAMP. Test excavations in 2015-2016 revealed a remarkable amount of material culture, including barrels, cauldrons, pewter plates, shoe buckles, cut...


Hard to Shop For: Surveying for a Birthday Present for the Nation’s Oldest Port (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Olivia A. McDaniel. P. Brendan Burke. Chuck T Meide.

During the 2015 field season the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) completed a program of target testing and remote sensing in the waters off St. Augustine, Florida, with the objective of locating early colonial shipwrecks. The project included a series of remote sensing resurveys to re-investigate and better understand several magnetic targets initially identified during two previous surveys carried out in 1995 and 2009. The 2015 survey was carried out in conjunction with St....


Have Tools Will Travel: An Examination of Tools Found on the Storm Wreck, A Loyalist Evacuation Transport Wrecked on the St. Augustine Bar in 1782 (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel P Turner.

This paper examines the collection of tools recovered from the Storm Wreck, a late eighteenth-century Loyalist evacuation transport lost in December of 1782 at the end of the American Revolutionary War on the St. Augustine Bar, in present-day St. Johns County, Florida. A variety of hand tools, many with their wooden handles preserved intact, have been recovered and are currently undergoing conservation treatment. While many of these tools were likely intended for general use in the home or...


Household Artifacts from the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher McCarron.

When Loyalist families evacuated Charleston, South Carolina in December 1782, they carried with them all they could bring from their homes. Domestic artifacts recovered from the Storm Wreck include pewter spoons and plates, a glass stopper, ceramics associated with tea consumption, a variety of iron and copper cookware, fireplace hardware, clothing irons, straight pins, padlocks and keys, furniture hardware, a candlestick, and a door lock stripped from an abandoned home, wrapped in course cloth...


The Investigation of the Anniversary Wreck, a Colonial Merchant Ship Lost off St. Augustine, Florida: Results of the 2017 Excavation Season (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chuck Meide.

In July 2015, during the city’s 450th anniversary celebration, a buried shipwreck was discovered off St. Augustine, Florida by the St. Augustine Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program, or LAMP. Test excavations in 2015-2016 revealed a remarkable amount of material culture, including barrels, cauldrons, pewter plates, shoe buckles, cut stone, and a variety of glass and ceramics. These tentatively dated the vessel to 1750-1800 and suggested its nationality was likely British but possibly...


The Investigation of the Anniversary Wreck, a Colonial Period Shipwreck off St. Augustine, Florida: Results of the First Excavation Season (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chuck Meide.

In July 2015, a buried shipwreck was discovered off St. Augustine, Florida by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program, or LAMP, a non-profit organization which serves as the research arm for the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum. A 2 x 1 m test excavation revealed a remarkable amount of material culture, including two barrels, as many as six cauldrons, numerous unidentified concretions, four pewter plates, and a single sherd of brown stoneware.  The plates and ceramic tentatively...


Navigational Instruments found on the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Maggie Burkett.

Between 2009 and 2015, excavations of the Storm Wreck (8SJ5459), a late 18th-century British shipwreck off the coast of St. Augustine, Florida by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) has revealed a variety of navigational instruments and components of such instruments. The primary navigational instruments discussed in this paper are a pair of navigational dividers, an octant, and a mathematical device known as a sector rule. This paper presents a historical analysis of each...


Pew Pew! Small Arms from the Storm Wreck, a Loyalist Evacuation Ship from the End of the American Revolutionary War. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Starr N Cox.

On or just after 31 December 1782, sixteen ships from a larger fleet evacuating Charleston, South Carolina wrecked while attempting to enter the St. Augustine Inlet. One of these sixteen ships, the Storm Wreck, has been the focus of six seasons of excavation for the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), the research arm of the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime Museum. The firearms recovered from the shipwreck include three Brown Bess muskets, two of which were loaded and in the...


Taking it Personally: Personal Items from the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hunter L. Brendel.

The Storm Wreck, a Loyalist refugee vessel fleeing Charleston near the end of the American Revolution in 1782, was discovered by LAMP in 2009. Since 2010, a systematic excavation of the shipwreck has been ongoing, aiming at documenting, recovering, and conserving diagnostic artifacts to further understand this shipwreck and its role in Florida’s Loyalist influx, a time of civil conflict and rapidly increasing population. This paper will review artifacts from the shipwreck categorized as personal...


Weight, Weight . . . Don’t Tell Me: the Assemblage of Weights from the Storm Wreck. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Thomson.

The Storm Wreck was a British refugee vessel that ran aground off St. Augustine 31 December 1782. As part of the evacuation fleet of Charleston, South Carolina, it was responsible for transporting the Loyalist population and their goods necessary to begin life again in East Florida. An unassuming assemblage of artifacts from the excavation can help elucidate aspects of the refugees’ lives, their thought process during the evacuation, life aboard the ship, and the eventual wrecking event. A wide...


Well, Well, Well: A look into the varieties and distribution of wells in colonial St. Augustine, FL (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mischa Johns. Carl Halbirt.

Since the City of St. Augustine's Archaeological Preservation Ordinance was enacted in 1986 more than 200 wells have been excavated. This presentation takes a look at some of the styles and circumstances of their construction and examines the the distribution of these various styles across the city's archaeological zones during the city's centuries of development. Through the varieties of well construction used over the centuries we hope to glean insight into the path that the city has taken...