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Animal Husbandry, Hunting, and Fishing on the Lower Cape Fear: Analysis of Colonial and Civil War Era Animal Remains from Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson

Author(s): Matthew Compton

Year: 2016

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Summary

Recent analyses of animal remains recovered from Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson provide information about the animal use practices of the site’s colonial and Civil War occupants. Colonial materials indicate a pattern similar to animal use observed among eighteenth-century Charleston sites with a heavy reliance on domesticates, particularly cattle, supplemented by estuarine resources. This Charleston pattern has been described as "urban" to contrast it with patterns of animal use observed at outlying or "rural" plantations that exhibit greater use of wild taxa. Intrasite comparison of two colonial Brunswick Town households suggests some differences in diet associated with socioeconomic status. In contrast to their colonial predecessors, the Civil War occupants of Fort Anderson relied heavily on wild species. The abundance of wild game corroborates contemporary accounts of life at Fort Anderson which indicate the Confederate soldiers spent time hunting and fishing in order to combat boredom and hunger while stationed at the Fort.


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Animal Husbandry, Hunting, and Fishing on the Lower Cape Fear: Analysis of Colonial and Civil War Era Animal Remains from Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson. Matthew Compton. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434642)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 492

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America