Heritage Tourism (Other Keyword)

1-15 (15 Records)

Archaeology as Heritage Resource: Foundations for Successful Archaeological Tourism, Achievements and Challenges from Petra to Angkor (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin Linn.

Global heritage tourism is at an all time high with tourism numbers expected to increase in the coming years. The challenges associated with managing heritage sites are as countless as they are complex. Heritage resources are finite non-renewal assets that provide critical links to the past, a source of identity, knowledge, and cultural values that enable communities and individuals to better understand and navigate the present. The management of archaeological resources, as part of heritage...


ArcheoChallenge: Incentivizing Archeological Awareness and Tourism in National Parks (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Dietrich. Dawn Bringelson.

This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. The National Park Service (NPS) has two main incentive-based tourism programs: The Passport and Junior Rangers.  Both of these offer guests souvenirs of their experiences in parks, and have successfully harnessed the psychology of collecting to foster enthusiasm and support for NPS resources, places, and stories.  The...


"Back to the Soil": Community Archaeology and Heritage Tourism in Eleuthera, Bahamas (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Whitney Battle-Baptiste. Elizabeth Chilton. Elena Sesma.

Over the past several decades there has been a great deal of archaeological excavation and analysis of both U.S. and Caribbean plantations. However, many of these research projects are designed to address archaeological research questions rather than some of the pressing problems faced by descendant communities concerning their heritage. In 1994, UNESCO launched their “Slave Route” project, with the aim of “contributing to a better understanding of the causes, forms of operation, issues and...


The Cape Point Maritime Cultural Landscape: Lighthouses, Shipwrecks, Baboons and Heritage Tourism in South Africa (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only B. Lynn Harris.

Since 2004, the Cape Point Nature Reserve has been part of the Cape Floral Kingdom, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The spectacular reserve has an abundance of wildlife, historic shipwrecks and a lighthouse. A shipwreck hiking trail is a popular feature. Heritage visitation combined with nature tourism is a key component in South African economic growth today.  The Cape Point area is a good example of showcasing a global maritime cultural landscape in a broader context and this study explores the...


Connecting Rivers, Sea, & Land: Panhandle Maritime National Heritage Area (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Della A Scott-Ireton. Sorna Khakzad. Michael B Thomin.

This is an abstract from the "The Public and Our Communities: How to Present Engaging Archaeology" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Florida history is firmly connected to its maritime landscape. A number of interpreted shipwreck trails, maritime museums, and archaeological resources along major rivers connect Northwest Florida’s land to its waterways and coastal areas. Although this region’s history plays an important part in the development of...


Diving to a Flash of Education: Archaeological Tourism at Maritime Sites (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Della Scott-Ireton. Jennifer McKinnon.

Underwater archaeological sites around the world draw thousands of diving tourists lured by the excitement of shipwrecks and the beauty of the marine environment. Through scientific research and beguiling information, archaeologists have the opportunity to educate these visitors about the history of the sites and, perhaps more importantly, about the need for preservation. Effective interpretation leads to appreciation of submerged cultural sites as links to our past, rather than simply as mines...


Hayden Flour Mill: Landscape, Economy, and Community Diversity in Tempe, Arizona, Volume 3: Hayden Flour Mill Historic Preservation Plan (2008)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Teresa L. Pinter. Don W. Ryder. Victoria D. Vargas.

The character of a community as expressed in its prehistory, history, and architecture is different from any other, and the City is no exception. A comprehensive Plan for cultural resources within the Hayden Flour Mill Project area is an essential component of the City’s future plans for downtown development. The Hayden Flour Mill Plan is a unique document that responds to Tempe’s goals and reflects its preservation values. As a forward-looking document, this Plan is intended to create...


Heritage Tourism and the Global Economy: The Values of Archaeology in the Experience Economy (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Uzi Baram.

Recognizing the intellectual, social, and political economic terrain for archaeology is crucial for effective and meaningful work in the present, archaeologists have reflected on the colonial, imperialist, and nationalist context for research and representations of the material past. Since the 1990s tourism has grown as a concern particularly as heritage tourism has expanded greatly, offering opportunities for preservation and representation of the past. Through multiple examples, this poster...


Interpretaions of Slavery throughout the Middle Atlantic Region (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katelyn Kean.

This poster presents the findings of an evaluation of the ways in which museums interpret and present slavery throughout Maryland and Virginia to the public. By comparing the various themes amplified when presenting slavery in a museum setting today, aspects of slavery the public is able to understand after visiting are assessed. To gauge this, a survey was administered to visitors at each of the following sites: Mount Vernon, Colonial Williamsburg, Monticello, Montpellier, and Sotterley...


Learning to "see" like an archaeologist: making the most out of field trips in undergraduate education in archaeology. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katherine Patton.

Field trips are an integral component of undergraduate education in the natural sciences and in human geography. In archaeology, field trips are a nexus of pedagogy, heritage tourism, public archaeology and critical theory. British archaeological theorists and educators have long discussed these elements of field trips, perhaps because such trips are central to undergraduate studies in the discipline in the UK. Little has been done, however, to assess the impact of archaeological field trips on...


Make history: public archaeology as a way of life (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin M. O'Briant.

Archaeologists, historians, and other scholars in the heritage sector share a responsibility to public interpretation, education, and the dissemination of our current understandings of the past often while challenging myths and dominant histories that clash with those interpretations. Use of dense academic jargon in archaeological publications represents a significant barrier to public engagement with our work, and narrow specializations prevent us from deploying our investigative tools to...


The New Public Archaeology: Evolving concepts in international public archaeology and interpretation (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John H Jameson.

In this presentation I discuss evolving concepts in public archaeology and interpretation. I give two examples, one from South Carolina, USA, and the other, as of early 2014, in Crimea, Ukraine, on how these concepts have been proposed and applied at sites and parks. In many parts of the West, the overarching trend is an increasing involvement of non-professionals in planning and carrying out archaeological and cultural heritage studies and public interpretation. We look at three evolving...


Overwhelmed with Possibilities: A Model for Urban Heritage Tourism Development (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tristan J. Harrenstein.

The city of Pensacola, FL has been attempting to create a heritage tourism industry for half a century but has never achieved the same level of success of some of the most notable destinations they were trying to emulate. This is, in part, due to a signifiant level of development in the historic district, much of which is now historic as well, combined with an impressively complex history concentrated in a relatively small area. If Pensacola, and any community in a similar sutation, is to...


Post-Industrial Placemaking: The Keweenaw Time Traveler and Community-Engaged Historical GIS (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Fayen Scarlett. Don Lafrenier. John Arnold.

Placemaking in post-industrial communities often becomes contested due to issues of conflicting memory, lack of economic resources, collective mistrust, and the problems of environmental degradation. A historical spatial data infrastructure known as the Keweenaw Time Traveler offers an interactive public-participatory platform to promote the health, both cultural and economic, of Michigan’s remote post-industrial mining region. This online GIS-based historical atlas breaks down traditional...


Promoting Responsible Heritage Tourism through Public Archaeology at Two Great Lakes Lighthouses (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Surface-Evans. S.K. Haase.

Central Michigan University recently undertook a series of public archaeology projects in cooperation with local historical societies and county governments in to investigate two northern Michigan lighthouses that are public parks. The McGulpin Point Lighthouse operated from 1869 to 1906 and was purchased by Emmett County in 2009. The 40 Mile Point Lighthouse was built in 1897, was deeded to Presque Isle County in 1998. The modern political and socioeconomic conditions of the two counties are...