cities (Other Keyword)

1-9 (9 Records)

Ancient Plazas for Modern Cities: A Role for Archaeology in City Planning Today (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Wildt.

For thousands of years, plazas have served as spaces for public gatherings. Modern plazas continue to serve many of the same functions as ancient plazas, providing a foundation for comparative studies. Archaeologists have begun to recognize the importance of incorporating modern studies of public spaces into their work, but in order for archaeology to remain relevant, we must engage with and contribute to studies of the modern world. It is necessary for us to work with scholars in these fields...


An archaeological light age: On modernity, urbanism and the materiality of light-based technologies. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hilary Orange.

Artificial light is synonymous with modernity and the industrial age. Light turns night into day, guides our way, and transforms place and material. Despite its centrality within the urban experience, light studies are fragmented across a diverse set of fields including, among others, architecture, history, planning and art. Where historical and contemporary archaeology are concerned, light and light-based technologies have received little attention. In 2015, the International Year of Light...


Christchurch: The Most English of New Zealand's Cities? (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Katharine J. Watson.

Established by the Canterbury Association in 1850, Christchurch, New Zealand, has long been regarded as the most English of New Zealand's cities. This sobriquet - sometimes meant positively, but often used negatively - has been based in large part on the city's appearance. Curiously, however, the validity of this assumption has never really been tested, and certainly has not been tested using archaeological data. The volume of archaeological work in Christchurch since the 2011 earthquakes - 2000...


Formal Open Space and its Relationship to Governance in Premodern Cities (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra Norwood.

Formally defined open spaces in cities give people a designated forum for interaction and impact how common people perceive each other and their authority. There is a critical lack of understanding of the origin of these spaces in the earliest cities and their social contexts. I will examine a sample of premodern cities, including archaeologically and historically documented examples, to clarify why formal open spaces exist, both in ancient cities and modern ones. This project stems from...


Living in an Old City: Practice and theory in urban heritage (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sefryn Penrose.

Half of the world’s population now lives in cities. But the heritage of the city can be seen as redundant: a problem to be solved through the right planning mechanism. Urban heritage practice has barely changed for 25 years. It privileges buildings and public realm, tourism, economics. It presumes preservation of fabric. Familiar orthodoxies dominate: ‘urban grain’; ‘the right materials’. It’s western centric. Taste is policed: there is a homogeneity to ‘heritage’. But this has not been how we...


Poultry in Motion: Chickens and Other Domestic Birds in Post-Medieval Cities (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Brooklynne Fothergill.

Chickens, turkeys and other domestic avian taxa were brought to and sold at city markets, kept by city-dwellers for various products and contributed to the general sensory experience of being in a city. Unlike other livestock, poultry were inexpensive and possible to husband successfully within the confined spaces characteristic of city life. Little is known about poultry husbandry in the post-medieval period apart from what can be gleaned from documentary sources and research has been limited...


The Same, but Different (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anne Pyburn.

Variations in the architecture, settlement patterns, local environmental context, and occupational history of Maya archaeological sites are difficult to assess. Which differences are culturally meaningful? Which similarities indicate social relationships, and if so what sort of relationships? Which differences are simply a result of local climate and available building materials? In this paper I will examine some of the similarities and differences among the three Maya sites in North-Central...


Settlement scaling in Medieval Europe and Tudor England (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rudolf Cesaretti.

From an archaeological perspective, the settlements of Late Medieval Europe lie far to one end of the social complexity spectrum. But from a modern perspective, they are decidedly ancient. Without the institutions and technologies of modern capitalism or the industrial revolution, Late Medieval settlements are commonly characterized as unproductive consumers within dynamic agrarian economies. Both economists and historians have assumed that the benefits of urban agglomeration economies – their...


Taking Their Water for Our City: Archaeology and Water Rights in New York and Beyond (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only April Beisaw.

Water rights is a social issue of growing importance. Recently, the United Nations declared access to clean drinking water to be a basic human right. Yet financial groups are predicting that water is the next major commodity, to be bought and sold like oil. What few are talking about is the long history of water flowing towards political and social centers, and away from rural populations. As Leith Mullings stated in her presidential address, anthropology pays attention to not only that which is...