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community archaeology (Other Keyword)

1-25 (72 Records)

Agelah and the Powershot: Digital Possibilities for Alternate Ways of Knowing in Archaeology (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Allison Mickel.

Digital recording methods offer a range of new means of collecting, organizing, and presenting archaeological information, which lead to new ways of thinking about the past. Capitalizing on the intuitive design of digital technologies additionally creates the potential for communities whose voices have been missing from the archaeological record to contribute their perspectives. In this paper, I draw upon my experiences experimenting with multimedia recording strategies at Petra, Jordan and at...


Applied Ethnobotany in Arid Lands: The Importance of Time, context and Collaboration (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Natalia Martínez Tagûeña.

This paper contributes to the field of applied ethnobotany, which focuses on the role that knowledge, institutions and cultural perspectives play in resource management and conservation (based on Cunningham). Through different case studies to understand people and their use of wild desert plants, this paper stresses the importance of collaboration between disciplines, principally among biological and social sciences; and secondly between formally trained researchers, and local people and...


Applying North American Approaches to Community Archaeology in Khirbet al-Mukhayyat, Jordan (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Jennifer Lewis.

"Community based" archaeology programs are all the rage in North America, as both academic and consulting archaeologists respond to descendant communities’ rights to management over their cultural heritage in the face of large-scale development and resource management. This movement is not yet applied in other regions facing similar challenges of economic development opportunities and access to heritage. The Khirbet al-Mukhayyat Community Archaeology Program (KMCAP) is inspired by North...


Archaeologies by Community Mandate: Who makes the call? (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Charlotte Sunseri. Jun Sunseri. Heather Atherton.

Historically, precious little academic archaeology has occurred under the watchful eye of descendant communities who have witnessed generations of researchers come and go, sometimes with no direct contact regarding the results of archaeological investigations in their ancestral places. Despite more recent overtures to mend these practices, we (as a discipline) are still woefully lacking in this regard. Nevertheless, significant changes in the role of cultural patrimony to that of lynchpin in...


Archaeology and the Production of Capital in the 21st Century (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Sarah Kurnick.

Over the last two decades, archaeologists have increasingly debated whether and how archaeology can be used to promote public welfare and foster progressive social change. Some scholars have emphasized the methodological importance of praxis. Others have emphasized the pragmatic need for public intellectuals. And, still others have emphasized the ethical necessity of community engagement. In this paper, I maintain that archaeology can and should be an ally in the effort to understand, and...


Archaeology in your Backyard: Successes and Lessons Learned from FPAN-Led Community Archaeology Projects (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Rebecca OSullivan.

Over the past 10 years, staff from the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) have developed curricula, programs, and trainings that educate both the general public and land managers about archaeology and Florida's unique past. While many of these initiatives might take place in a classroom or lecture hall, FPAN archaeologists also get out in the field to organize community archaeology projects that engage the public with the discovery of their own pasts. This presentation will highlight some...


Archaeology's Role in Changing a Generation of Youth: Exploring Education and Intersectionality (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Alexandra Jones.

Archaeology in the Community (AITC) is an urban-based archaeology organization founded with the intent of providing science opportunities to marginalized youth who would have never been exposed to archaeology through their education system. This paper highlights how intersectional theory is used by AITC to expose and increase students’ knowledge of archaeology as a science. Intersectionality theory emphasizes the structural intersection of social categories and studies the concept of...


The Backyard Shipwreck: The 2017 Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Field School Exploration Of A Shipwreck in Basin Harbor (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Allyson Ropp.

The 2017 Field School held by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum explored an unknown wreck lying in Basin Harbor. One of the primary reasons for the start of the museum, the wreck has been known about since the inception of the Basin Harbor Club around the harbor. Yet the identity, time period, and type of vessel still remain unknown. This year's field school aimed to answer some of these questions. Basing the research design on the previous research conducted on site in 1982 and 2016, the field...


Birch Island: The Archaeology and Memory of Resettlement (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Julia Brenan.

Archaeology has the ability to bring people together and assist communities in creating their own historical narrative so it can be passed on and acknowledged, corrected and recorded, within and outside of their community. My work in Happy Valley-Goose Bay, Labrador on an archaeological site that only ended occupation in the late 1960s facilitates the formalization of the historical narrative of the former Birch Island community through archaeology, historical research and personal interviews....


Building a College in Colonial America: evidence from Harvard Yard, Cambridge, MA. (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Patricia Capone. Sarah Johnson. Diana Loren. Jade W Luiz. Jennifer Poulsen.

Recent excavations in the Harvard Yard have expanded our understanding of investment and institutionalization of education in the 17th century. Archaeology of Harvard's first building demonstrates the richness of material culture used at the dining table and the investment made to construct a significant structure on the landscape. We provide a preliminary analysis of artifact density and distribution of dining and architectural objects of the most recent excavation season, laying the groundwork...


Can Archaeology help Decolonize the way Institutions Think? How community-based research is transforming the archaeology training toolbox and educating institutions (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Sonya Atalay.

Community-based research requires systemic shifts within institutions, from the way research is funded, protection of human subjects/IRB reviews, ethical guidelines, and what is legible/valued in tenure & promotion decisions. Some of the most important yet least discussed changes must happen in the classroom, in terms of what & how we teach. For community-based archaeologists, we know that process matters. How we conduct research with community partners is essential. The relationships and trust...


Co-Interpreting the Past – Shaping the Present, Building the Future (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Ieva Paberzyte.

Interest in the past brings archaeologists and Indigenous people together. Archaeologists reveal the past through material remains, while Indigenous people remember the past and keep it alive through stories. Often the past for archaeologists is an object of scientific curiosity, while for Indigenous people storytelling is an essential part of their identity. Stories provide wisdom and strength to deal with challenges in the present and the future. Joint efforts of archaeologists and Indigenous...


Codes of ethics and archaeology in practice: "communal archaeology" and citizen science towards the advancement of the discipline (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Isabel Rivera-Collazo.

Adherence to codes of ethics is central to successful and respected practice of archaeology. The SAA’s Code of Ethics includes eight principles that address critical broad issues, including the importance of in-situ long-term conservation and protection of archaeological sites (Principle 1), establishing beneficial working relationships with all parties (Principle 2) and the importance of public outreach (Principle 4). Even though, as members of the SAA, we agree that these principles are the...


Collaborative Archaeologies in Transformation: Preliminary Results from a Social Network Analysis of Archaeological Practice (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Katharine Ellenberger.

Collaborative or community-based archaeology can involve a range of activities from modifying dissemination practices to shifting to writing research designs with a coalition including non-archaeologists. These approaches were built as responses to specific concerns by crafting research methods to the modern context of archaeology. Out of these myriad approaches has developed a social network of scholars whose professional interactions are consequential for understanding contemporary...


Comcaac Collaborative Ethnohistory: The Importance of Objects, Places, Routes and Leaders. (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Natalia Martínez-Tagüeña. Lorenzo Herrera-Casanova. Luz Alicia Torres-Cubillas.

In collaboration with Comcaac community members of Sonora, Mexico, oral accounts are combined with archival documents and with archaeological survey. For the colonial period in Sonora, historians and anthropologists have mostly relied upon archival documents written by representatives of the Spanish empire, in addition to information from historical archaeology. The Comcaac knowledge immersed in oral traditions balances some of the inherent biases in the Spanish documentary record, and sheds...


Community action at sites threatened by natural processes (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Tom Dawson. Elinor Graham. Joanna Hambly.

Around the world, thousands of archaeological sites are threatened by coastal processes. Although many countries have successfully implemented schemes to address threats from development, this is not the case for sites at risk from natural processes. Without developers to fund mitigation projects, the scale of the problem appears enormous, and it is difficult for individual agencies to commit to preserving, or even recording, everything at risk. Systems are needed to update information and...


Community Archaeology and Ancient Ceramics: Developing an Inclusive Research Design in San Jose Succotz, Belize (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Alessandra Villarreal.

Collaborative archaeology is an approach that promotes the inclusion of modern, indigenous communities in the study of the ancient past. In the Maya area, local communities have recently become more involved with archaeological research at multiple stages, including research design, data collection, and community outreach. At the same time, advances in the qualitative and quantitative study of early ceramics have allowed archaeologists to further elucidate ancient Maya chronology, economy, and...


Community Archaeology and the Criminal Past: Exploring a Detroit Speakeasy (2016)

Citation DOCUMENT Brenna J Moloney.

Community-engaged archaeology has played a role in reshaping the city of Detroit’s popular heritage narrative from one of decline and decay to one more rich and complex. In 2013, archaeologists from Wayne State University investigated Tommy's Bar, a rumored Prohibition-era speakeasy and haunt of the infamous Purple Gang. The project was a partnership between the University, a historic preservation non-profit, and the bar's owner. The project culminated in a theme party where archaeologists...


Community Archaeology on a Social Housing Estate in the Early 21st Century: Middlefield Lane, Gainsborough (UK) (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Carenza R Lewis.

Middlefield Lane, in the former Midlands industrial town of Gainsborough (UK), was one of many new post-war British social housing estates built to replace crowded, insanitary 19th century slums with better quality housing and open space, and modelled on the 1928 ‘garden city’ plan of Radburn, New Jersey. Radburn is a national monument but elsewhere, time and policy-makers have left such estates deprived and unprepossessing places with high levels of social deprivation. Social critics have...


Community Archaeology Starting Young: Local High School Engagement in Tucson, Arizona (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Rebecca Renteria.

The past few years archaeology has seen an increase in community-based approaches. These approaches are important when addressing issues of who archaeology knowledge, interpretation, and sites belong to. Archaeological interpretations historically come from those in roles of academic authority, but we increasingly see acknowledgement of collaboration and contribution from community members not in those roles. A rise in diversity of cultural and heritage backgrounds among archaeologists is a...


Community Archaeology, Essentializing Identity, and Racializing the Past (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Bradley D Phillippi. Eiryn Sheades.

As anthropologically guided archaeologists, we like to think we are beyond searching for romanticized images of "Natives," "Africans," or any essentialized "other," but despite our best efforts, we still fall victim to its simplicity. Collaborating with descendent communities broadens our perspective, but their perceptions of the past and their ancestors can further complicate the dilemma. This paper explores two mixed-heritage communities in Setauket and Amityville, both on Long Island, New...


Community Entanglements: Archaeology, Heritage, and Community Partnership at the Little Bay Plantation, Montserrat, West Indies (2015)

Citation DOCUMENT Jessica Striebel MacLean.

Tourism has replaced sugar as the Caribbean’s economic engine. The ruins of sugar mills incorporated into resorts create cultural experiences rooted in romanticized notions of colonialism. Paradoxically the labor structure of this externally driven model replicates the racial, economic, and social divisions of the plantation structure. Promoted as "sustainable," the recent shift to heritage tourism while advantageous to archaeology is rife with the colonizing potential of Eurocentric tourism and...


Community Perceptions and Effects of the Bridge River Community Archaeological Project, 2012-2016 (2017)

Citation DOCUMENT Kristen Barnett.

The Xwisten (Bridge River) community has had an ongoing collaborative relationship with the University of Montana, exploring the archaeology of the Bridge River Village, site Eerl4. The latest series of inquiries at the Bridge River Village focused on the excavation of Housepit 54, a single, mid-sized, semi-subterranean pithouse with 17 anthropogenic floors from occupations spanning 1800BP-ca. 1850’s CE. The goal of this research is to explore the perceptions of the discipline of archaeology,...


Community, Archaeology and Public Heritage in Telford - an English New Town (2013)

Citation DOCUMENT Paul Belford.

This poster describes a recent community archaeology project in Telford, a new town created in the 1960s. The project began in 2010 and continues to 2014, and involves a wide range of community groups and others. Fieldwork focusses on the 'Town Park', a large area of public open space that contains a number of previously unexplored remains associated with 19th and 20th century industrialisation and de-industrialisation. So far the project has explored 19th century workers' housing, a 19th...


The Complexity of Archaeological Site Revisits: A Case Study from Labrador (2018)

Citation DOCUMENT Jacinda Sinclair.

The five sites recorded in Junius Bird’s 1934 survey of the Hopedale area are both culturally important to the local Inuit community and to the history of the creation of archaeological narratives about the Labrador Inuit. Recently, the Hopedale and Nunatsiavut governments have stated a desire for additional archaeological research prompting Memorial University to revisit the Avertok and Karmakulluk sites to conduct additional excavations. In the 83 years that have passed since Bird’s work, many...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America