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Can Archaeology help Decolonize the way Institutions Think? How community-based research is transforming the archaeology training toolbox and educating institutions

Author(s): Sonya Atalay

Year: 2017

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Summary

Community-based research requires systemic shifts within institutions, from the way research is funded, protection of human subjects/IRB reviews, ethical guidelines, and what is legible/valued in tenure & promotion decisions.

Some of the most important yet least discussed changes must happen in the classroom, in terms of what & how we teach. For community-based archaeologists, we know that process matters. How we conduct research with community partners is essential. The relationships and trust we build; how we design and carry out projects in a participatory way; and the formats we choose for sharing results often need to be retooled.

In this paper I consider these issues in two parts. First, I examine how community-based archaeological research is helping decolonize institutions by introducing new ways of thinking about the goals, processes, and outcomes of research. Second, I consider the skills and training that community-based archaeology requires, and I present my recent encounters and experiments in cultivating literacies and competency in these areas amongst undergraduate and graduate students. I close by examining our responsibilities as scholars to bring about curricular change in our departments, universities, and professional organizations; including suggestions of next steps for the SAA in this area.


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Can Archaeology help Decolonize the way Institutions Think? How community-based research is transforming the archaeology training toolbox and educating institutions. Sonya Atalay. Presented at The 81st Annual Meeting of the Society for American Archaeology, Vancouver, British Columbia. 2017 ( tDAR id: 431541)


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Spatial Coverage

min long: -104.634; min lat: 36.739 ; max long: -80.64; max lat: 49.153 ;

Record Identifiers

Abstract Id(s): 15863

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America