contact period (Other Keyword)

1-25 (173 Records)

3D Reconstruction of Early Spanish Colonial Hybrid Ceramics from Ciudad Vieja, El Salvador (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeb Card. Salem Arvin.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The primary serving vessel at the sixteenth-century Spanish colonial site of Ciudad Vieja, El Salvador, is an indigenously produced brimmed plate made in the form of Italianate majolica. These vessels were produced in a Mesoamerican technological tradition and were painted with a modified version of designs found on pre-Hispanic Pipil pottery in southeastern...


Acting, Reacting, and Entangling at the Edge of the Spanish Colony: Maya Life at Progresso Lagoon, Belize in the Context of Colonization (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Maxine Oland.

The Maya of northern Belize were located at the edge of the Spanish colony, far from the Spanish capital at Merida, and visited only occasionally by encomenderos and priests. How much of Maya life then was a reaction to Spanish colonization? The archaeological data from Progresso Lagoon, Belize suggest that most contact and colonial period material culture at the Maya community was shaped by ongoing Maya political and economic processes, rather than by Spanish intervention. In addition, Maya...


The Agency of Flowing Water in Human Mobility and Interaction (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephanie Salwen.

Water is one of the most powerful agents of change on the planet. Flowing water can build and destroy landscapes rapidly in dramatic fashion as with flash flooding or gradually through incremental natural processes, shaping the terrain through sedimentation, erosion, and seasonal fluctuations in water flow. Within human societies, these waterways may be perceived as a source of danger, but also provide subsistence and non-subsistence resources, and serve as landscape features that alter how...


Algonquian Landscapes and Multispecies Archaeology in the Chesapeake (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Martin Gallivan.

This is an abstract from the "Silenced Rituals in Indigenous North American Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeological and ethnohistorical studies have begun to trace the ritualized practices of Native groups as they returned to places with deep histories throughout the Southeast during the colonial era. In the seventeenth-century Chesapeake, Algonquian groups traveled across contested territories to bury ancestors, animals, and...


Alterity, Resistance, and Autonomy: Mortuary Archaeology and the Diversity of Indigenous Responses to Spanish Conquest in Lambayeque, Peru (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Haagen Klaus.

Over the last few decades, archaeological narratives have shifted towards far more nuanced understandings of colonized peoples in favor of reconstructing nuanced and integrated understandings of indigenous perception, identity, biosocial interplays, and other responses to conquest. This work merges archaeological, ecological, and bioarchaeological contexts to help understand the significance of mortuary pattern data to compare postcontact cultural outcomes in Mórrope and Eten, two...


Analyzing the Utilization of Shell in Chickasaw Pottery Using Petrographic and Chemical Composition Techniques (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Domenique Sorresso.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Archaeological and ethnographic records indicate that a change in ceramic technology from recent shell to fossil shell temper took place as the contact period Chickasaw of Mississippi migrated north and adjusted to upland settlements of the Blackland Prairie. While this shift is widely accepted within the archaeology of the region, it can be difficult to apply...


Ancestral Chickasaw Migration and the Makings of the Anthropocene in Southeastern North America (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles Cobb. Brad Lieb. Tony Boudreaux.

We describe recent investigations of Indigenous communities who vacated the Tombigbee drainage of eastern Mississippi in the mid-fifteenth century A.D. These and surrounding groups migrated into nearby uplands known as the Blackland Prairie. Populations continued to move northward within the prairie and coalesced around what is today Tupelo, MS, in the 1600s. The move from a riverine to upland setting involved a dramatic shift in practices of historical ecology. The rich soils and open terrain...


An Archaeological Perspective on Oral Traditions, Regarding Migration, of the Northern Caddoan Speaking Tribes (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carlton Gover.

Affiliating prehistoric archaeological sites with contemporary indigenous communities in American archaeology is often met with skepticism and criticism. As a means for overcoming the inherent criticism; I utilize the oral traditions, regarding migration, of the Northern Caddoan speaking tribes as a means to construct a relative chronology for which these populations moved across the landscape in prehistory. Then I compare the relative chronology with the archaeological record. By comparing site...


Archaeology and Ethnohistory in the Sahuaripa Region of Eastern Sonora (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only John Carpenter. Guadalupe Sanchez Miranda.

There is little doubt that there exists cultural continuity linking the Río Sonora tradition and the Ópata (a term referring to an amalgamation of several groups, generally including Eudeve, Teguima and Jova-cf. Yetman 2010; Spicer 1962). The socio-political organization of the late prehispanic Rio Sonora archaeological tradition remains controversial though little studied. Carroll Riley (1982, 1987, 1999, 2005; see also Doolittle 1984, 1988, 2008) proposed that they constitute "statelets",...


Assembling Infrastructure, Detotalizing Communities: Provincial Infrastructure as Situated History and Landscape in British Columbia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Peter Johansen.

Investigation of the material, spatial and temporal distributedness of large-scale, infrastructure projects holds significant potential to lay bare histories of underlying political rationales and practices that challenge overtly utilitarian narratives of public welfare and economic good. This paper investigates the differential experience and perception of a sample of state-initiated or sanctioned infrastructure projects (e.g., Hydro power lines and substations, pipelines, highways and...


Authority via Mobility: Interpreting Yamasee Ceramics (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patrick Johnson.

Yamasees worked as non-missionized laborers in Spanish Florida, raided for Charleston traders, fought to expand Georgia, lived with Creek Indians, and worked as diplomats and traders in Pensacola. Letters, speeches, and testimony demonstrate that this mobility— often leading them to outnumber local occupants— allowed Yamasees to dictate terms to and take vengeance against other Native Americans as well as Europeans. Despite such authority, pottery assemblages demonstrate the frequent adoption of...


Baubles, Bangles and Beads: The Role of Personal Adornments in a 17th Century Spanish Mission Period Community (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard Jefferies. Christopher Moore.

More than a decade of archaeological investigations at Mission San Joseph de Sapala and its associated Guale village of Sapala on Sapelo Island, Georgia have provided significant new insights into the nature of Spanish-Guale interaction and negotiation. Some of these cultural transactions are reflected by items of clothing or personal adornment that were worn by the Spanish and/or Native Americans who lived in that 17th century Spanish Mission community. This poster explores the nature of...


Bioarchaeology and Genome Justice: What Are the Implications for Indigenous Peoples? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebecca Tsosie.

This is an abstract from the "Social Justice in Native North American Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. This paper examines the theme of "discovery," used in relation to Indigenous lands and peoples to designate the respective claims of Indigenous peoples and the European peoples that colonized North America. In particular, I look at the domain of "bioarchaeology" and the construct of "genome justice" to explore how DNA science attempts...


Building an Empire: Spanish Colonial Encounters with Maya Houses and Housebuilding (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alyce De Carteret.

In the late sixteenth century, King Philip II of Spain sent out a request to the local administrators of his overseas colonies, asking that they complete a questionnaire designed to collect information about the lands he had conquered. The responses to this questionnaire, completed primarily between 1578-1586, form a set of documents now known as the Relaciones Geográficas. Question 31 asked respondents to describe the form and construction of the local houses and the materials used to build...


The Burial Ground at Otstonwakin: Native American Mortuary Practices in 18th Century Pennsylvania (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Ann Levine.

The multinational village of Otstonwakin was a key nexus of colonial and indigenous interaction where colonial identities were expressed as well as constituted through material remains. The sacred landscape that was used by the residents of Otstonwakin to bury their dead was disturbed by road construction projects in both the late 1800s and early 1900s. While the full extent of the cemetery associated with Otstonwakin is unknown, the burial ground is represented by four documented graves and a...


Burial Plots: Finding Theatre in the Thanatology of Colonial North Coast Peru. (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Connie Ericksen. Haagen Klaus. John Clark. Zachary Chase.

Spain's invasion of the Andes initiated a social drama unprecedented in the experience of the Andean natives. Spanish and Spanish-conscripted native chroniclers wrote extensively about Inca pageantry, spectacle, and ritual, and hastily attributed pagan belief to performances they witnessed or heard about. With equal haste, the Spanish appropriated performance as means of introducing and enforcing Christianity. In this paper, I treat performance as the central feature of Andean Colonial...


Call of the Wild: Historic Preservation in Region 1’s Wilderness (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jorie Clark. Cathy Bickenheuser.

Region 1 of the U.S. Forest Service manages more than 25 million acres in Washington, Idaho, Montana, and North and South Dakota, with more than five million acres designated as Wilderness and Wilderness Study Areas. Because of the Wilderness Act, NHPA Section 106 surveys that would identify potential archaeological sites are generally not undertaken in Wilderness areas. However, a number of known historic structures in these areas have been restored by the Northern Region Historic Preservation...


Cape Porpoise Archaeological Partnership (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tim Spahr.

The Cape Porpoise Archaeological Partnership is an alliance between the Kennebunkport Conservation Trust and the Brick Store Museum. Its purpose is to conduct archaeological study of the islands in Cape Porpoise harbor located just off the coast of Kennebunkport, Maine. Evidence suggests that Historic and Pre-Historic Period archaeological sites are present. Sea level rise due to global climate change, however, is causing shoreline erosion damaging or potentially destroying these locations....


Cherokee-Spanish Interactions in the Middle Nolichucky Valley, Tennessee, Revealed by Geophysics and Targeted Excavations (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Eileen Ernenwein. Jay Franklin. Nathan Shreve.

The Middle Nolichucky River in northeast Tennessee has been largely overlooked in Mississippian prehistoric narratives, but recent geophysical surveys and archaeological excavations at the Cane Notch site document a mid- to late- 16th century Cherokee Town with evidence of Spanish contact. Our multimethod approach includes sitewide magnetometry and a large portion covered with ground penetrating radar (GPR). Excavation of a house floor unearthed a rich assemblage of glass trade beads and...


Chicasa and Soto: Toward a Continuum of Disentanglement (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robbie Ethridge. Charles Cobb.

This is an abstract from the "Disentanglement: Reimagining Early Colonial Trajectories in the Americas" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The concept of "entanglement," when applied to the Native American colonial experience, usually assumes both an inevitability and magnitude that comes with historical hindsight. Such an assumption easily masks the fact that historical players did not act with this in mind and that encounters between Natives and...


Chickasaws and Presbyterians: What Did It Mean To Be Civilized? (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Rooney.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In the decade prior to their removal, the Chickasaws allowed Presbyterian missionaries to set up a school on their lands to gain the benefit of a western education for their children and potential allies in the struggles they were inevitably going to have with the expanding United States. Here, native children were being exposed to missionary tactics to...


Colonial Cuba: From Indian to Creole (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Roberto Valcárcel Rojas.

The construction of the Indian as a colonial category was one of the first resources of domination implemented by the Spaniards in the Antilles. The term with its social, economic and cultural implications served to homogenize and differentiate populations, to eliminate identities of origin and to build a destiny of subordination and disappearance. In Cuba this category was transformed over the last five centuries and adjusted to various historical circumstances. The historical and...


The Colonial Peten: An Ethnohistory of Indigenous Sovereignty and a Failed Spanish Colonial Project (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alyce De Carteret.

This is an abstract from the "Disentanglement: Reimagining Early Colonial Trajectories in the Americas" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Colonialism—to speak generally—can be characterized as endeavors that aim not just to entangle, but to wholly incorporate, disparate regions under the control of a foreign body. Indigenous disentanglement from these exploitative projects has taken many forms—daily negotiations, subtle refusals, outright rebellions....


Colonization, Transformation and Continuities in the Indigenous Caribbean (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Corinne L. Hofman. Roberto Valcárcel Rojas. Jorge Ulloa Hung.

The indigenous peoples of the Caribbean were the first to have suffered European colonization of the Americas. From the arrival of Columbus in 1492 the insular territories were transformed in a massive slave raiding arena in which the knowledge of so-labelled ‘indios’ was used and manipulated by the Europeans and transferred across the Caribbean Sea. Indigenous peoples were put to work in the goldmines and farms of Hispaniola, Cuba and Puerto Rico or in the pearl fisheries in Cubagua. On the...


Comcaac Collaborative Ethnohistory: The Importance of Objects, Places, Routes and Leaders. (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Natalia Martínez-Tagüeña. Lorenzo Herrera-Casanova. Luz Alicia Torres-Cubillas.

In collaboration with Comcaac community members of Sonora, Mexico, oral accounts are combined with archival documents and with archaeological survey. For the colonial period in Sonora, historians and anthropologists have mostly relied upon archival documents written by representatives of the Spanish empire, in addition to information from historical archaeology. The Comcaac knowledge immersed in oral traditions balances some of the inherent biases in the Spanish documentary record, and sheds...