Resistance (Other Keyword)

1-20 (20 Records)

Alone in the Deep Blue Sea: A comparison of Indonesian Colonial Period nutmeg plantations and New World plantations (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amy Jordan.

Plantations on the nutmeg-bearing Banda Islands are contemporaneous with early North American plantations and are an excellent place to investigate cross-cultural responses to colonialism. The Banda Islands were the world’s sole source of nutmeg in the 16th century and control over this spice was a major goal for European powers during the Age of Expansion. Consequently, the Banda Islands were the location of early experiments in colonialism by European powers and can provide information for...


Archaeologies of Antislavery Resistance (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only terrancw weik.

Archaeologists have explored self-liberated Africans ("Maroons") in the Americas and proponents of collaborative resistance movements (for instance, the Underground Railroad or African-Native American alliances), especially material aspects of them that fall within the period 1600–1865.  Despite this focus, researchers working in the Americas have much to gain from considering the global dimensions of antislavery resistance, a term that will be used to signify any form of defiance against...


The Archaeology of Gendered Resistance at the Industrial Mine in Superior, CO (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura E Vernon.

The Industrial Mine at Superior, operating from 1895 to 1945, was one of many coal mines situated within a region known as the Colorado Northern Coal fields. It is exceptional only in that it was one of the largest coal producers in the area and because it was the sole mine in the region with both a company town and company store. This paper examines how camp housing structured the lives of women living at the Industrial Mine, as well as how women altered the camp. Through their gendered...


Archaeology of repression and resistance during Francoist dictatorship (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Xurxo Ayán. Carlos Tejerizo. Josu Santamarina. José Señorán.

Structural and physical violence are common instruments used by dictatorial regimes in order to impose their hegemony and to gain legitimacy within local communities. At the same time, repression usually entails resistance from individuals and societies, which may be active or passive, physic or ideological. Both repression and resistance are materialized in landscapes and objects which can be analysed through Archaeology, telling stories not visible by other means. In this paper, we will...


Carving out Niches for Rest and Resistance: Landscape Adaptation Writ Small at the Slave Cabins of Kingsley Plantation (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amber J Grafft-Weiss.

Historians and archaeologists alike have noted the structural repression imposed by the plantation landscape. The organization of spaces and various structures on plantations allowed for optimal surveillance through the establishment of clearly delineated areas suggesting prescribed labor or activity. Personal spaces associated with enslaved Africans or African Americans were often easily visible from parts of the plantation that were typically occupied by white authority figures. Archaeological...


Chicago’s Gray House as Underground Railroad Station?: Narrating Resistance, 1856-present (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rebecca Graff.

The Gray House stands within Chicago’s Old Irving Park neighborhood. Known for his anti-slavery stance, John Gray was Cook County’s first Republican sheriff, and a legend arose designating his home a station on the Underground Railroad. As an archaeological project at the site commences, its environs on Chicago’s northwest side feature an emerging network of clandestine routes and collective resistance, focused this time on a population at high risk of federal immigration raids. This paper...


Education as Resistance: The African School and New Guinea Community on Nantucket (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer McCann. Victoria A Cacchione. Jared P Muehlbauer.

In African American communities, education serves as a crucial tool used to resist racism and ensure the persistence of their culture and identity. In 1826 the African-American community of New Guinea followed this tradition with the establishment of the first public school on Nantucket. For the next two decades, the African school became the focus of an intense battle over school segregation on the island. While Nantucket’s popular history places the island at the forefront of the abolition and...


Engineering an Ecosystem of Resistance: Late Intermediate Period Farming in the South-Central Andes (A.D. 1100-1450) (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only BrieAnna Langlie.

In the 15th century, the Inca built the largest pre-colonial empire in the western hemisphere. In southern Peru near Lake Titicaca, an ethnic group known as the Colla violently resisted conquest by the Inca for several years. Because of their military prowess, the Inca named one quarter of their empire, Collasuyo, after this group. The Colla’s ability to resist Inca subjugation was facilitated by their decentralized economy evident in their construction and management of a new agricultural...


Great Dismal Swamp Land Study (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Riccio. Justin E. Uehlein. Becca Peixotto.

The Great Dismal Swamp Landscape Study (GDSLS), which was formed in 2002, has been investigating the swamp by means of archaeological excavation. The project has been successful in exploring the enigmatic history of disenfranchised Native Americans, African Maroons, and others who sought refuge from the colonial world ca. 1660-1865.The project revolves around a predictive model of community structure that can be tested on various sites in the swamp. Current research focuses on the interior, or...


Hallowed Ground, Sacred Space: The African-American Cemetery at George Washington’s Mount Vernon and the Plantation Landscapes of the Enslaved. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph A. Downer.

The cemeteries used by slaves on many plantations in the 18th and 19th centuries were places where communities could practice forms of resistance and develop distinct African-American traditions. These spaces often went unrecorded by elites, whose constructed landscapes were designed to convey messages of their own status and authority. Therefore, few records exist that document the usage of slave burial grounds. Furthermore, poor preservation and modern development have obliterated many...


Marked on the Landscape: The African American Experience at Clover Bottom Plantation (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Noel Harris.

This paper presents a study of Clover Bottom’s extant outbuildings and historic dwellings in relation to excavated artifact concentrations and architectural features in order to expand our understanding of the plantation landscape from the perspective of its African American majority. Vernacular architectural research presents clues to dates of construction and shifting building functions over time. Informed by primary descriptions of the property, the study of spatial relationships and lines of...


Navigating Cusco: Pathways to History and Landscapes of Social Conflict in the Inca Imperial Capital (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Steve Kosiba.

In creating Cusco, the Incas assembled a landscape of monuments and pathways that embodied a mythic vision of the past. But how did Cusco’s landscape, which was invested with pre-Inca meanings and memories, become Inca? In this paper, I present archaeological and ethnohistorical data from Cusco to explore how Cusco’s indigenous people constructed their past under Inca and early Spanish rule. I examine how pathways and landscapes in Cusco—the processions of the Capac Raymi and Situa ceremonies,...


Oakley Cabin: Revisited (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Heather Bouslog.

This presentation will give an overview of the past and present investigations of this African American archaeological site in the heart of Montgomery County, Maryland. Particular attention will be given to Oakley Cabin's historical context as a "geography of resistance."


Redressing Power: Road Building in British Colonial Cyprus (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin S.L. Gibson.

Road building has always been essential to the process of colonisation. In Cyprus, British Colonial road building was part of a larger project to secure and civilise the island and its population, making it a model for how other countries should be administered in the Near East. The construction of roads between 1880 and 1900 focussed on establishing security and bringing order to the landscape and its people. In this presentation I focus on the multifaceted dimensions of the construction, use...


Resistance and Intersectionality in Maroon Archaeology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mary Elizabeth Ibarrola.

We define Maroons by their overt resistance; theirs was one of the most extreme forms of anti-slavery opposition in the Americas and for many scholars is representative of the human desire to be free. However, defining Maroons by the act of marronage is isolating and limits attempts to study cultural continuities and ethnogenesis amongst the wider African Diaspora. This paper will look at the potential for, and advantages of, an intersectional maroon archaeology. Through the lens of marronage in...


Ritual and Resistance at Trents Cave, Barbados (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Armstrong.

An overview of religious practice and resistance reflected in the material record of Trents Cave, Barbados.  The cave site is located at the bottom of a gully located between the enslaved laborer settlement and the planter’s residence at Trents Plantation.  The findings suggest recurrent use of the site by persons of African descent (circa 1750s through the 1850s) for ritual, or specialized purposes, associated with iron and steel.  The distinctive pattern of deposition of key artifacts...


A theory on cultural inversion: resistance, resilience and agency within the archaeology of colonialism (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allison Carlton.

Colonial studies have progressed exponentially in archaeology, but such studies can suffer from contextual limitations. Analyzing colonialism in many different social contexts adds to its potential as a lens through which to study the archaeological record. Diverse applicability would allow archaeologists an opportunity to make sense of colonialism’s profuse influence on the people it affects. Throughout the 19th-century, the Nipmuc from eastern Massachusetts faced many of the common processes...


Towasa Diaspora: Ignoring the European Presence as a Response to Colonization (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gregory Waselkov.

Discovery of a small Muskogee-tradition component at site 1BA664, overlooking the Gulf of Mexico in Orange Beach, Alabama, is tentatively identified as a fishing and hunting camp of the Towasas, radiocarbon dated to ca. 1700. Propelled westward by British and Creek slaving raids in 1705 that destroyed their towns in north Florida, the Towasas have never before been linked to an archaeological site assemblage. Artifacts from site 1BA664 suggest minimal acquisition of European technology, despite...


Without regard for persons: The archaeology of american capitalism (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Matthews.

In The Archaoelogy of American Capitalism, I examine a diverse range of studies to make the case that the historical archaeology in the United States is well served by a direct analysis of capitalism as a principle context for production, consumption, and cultural experience in America. Whether looking at the fur trade, the Georgian order, the creation of modern cities and industries or the practices of history-making and archaeology itself, I show how the lust for profit and bourgeois...


Zones of Refuge: Resisting Conquest in the Northern Philippine Highlands through Agricultural Practice (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen Acabado.

The origins of the extensive wet-rice terrace complex in Ifugao, Philippines have been recently dated to ca. 400 years ago. Previously thought to be at least 2,000 years old, the recent findings of the Ifugao Archaeological Project show that landscape modification for terraced wet-rice cultivation started at ca. 1600. The archaeological record implies that economic intensification and political consolidation occurred in Ifugao soon after the appearance of the Spanish empire in the northern...