globalization (Other Keyword)

1-15 (15 Records)

Between Control and Influence - Early Globalization processes in Bronze Age China (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Yitzchak Jaffe.

The traditional narrative of the Zhou expansion (1046-771 BCE, roughly 800 before the formation of the first Chinese empire in 221 BCE), has been to view it as a military enlargement and conquest and as leading, consequently, to the establishment of a polity controlling a large territorial state. To date, most studies have viewed the finding of Zhou artifacts in a given region as indicating Zhou political control over that area or even that actual Zhou people inhabited the region. This paper...


British Capital, Mercury Miners, and Transfer Print Ceramics in 19th Century Peru (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas K Smit.

During the late 18th century, Spanish colonies in South America increasingly liberalized their trade policies, leading to an increased access to British goods such as transfer print ceramics. In Peru, the importation of transfer print ceramics grew rapidly after independence in 1824, along with the entry of British capital into the mining sector of the Peruvian economy. This paper examines the role of transfer print ceramics at Santa Barbara, an indigenous mercury mining community located...


Culinary Worlds Colliding: Using Biography to Understand the Alimentary Experience of Migration and ‘Modernization’ in Gilded Age & Progressive Era Chicago  (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Megan E. Edwards. Rebecca S. Graff.

In 1893 Chicago hosted an event that brought the entire world– and it’s foods– together in the space of an ephemeral ‘white city’.  The World’s Columbian Exposition– America’s showcase for the possibilities of an increasingly globalized, modern world– was itself taking place in an uneasily globalizing and modernizing city. The aim here is to access something of the texture of one very intimate aspect of personal life in the midst of such transition– in the consumption of and reaction to food by...


Detecting Dutchness: Global Identities in the 17th Century Dutch Atlantic (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica L. Nelson.

This paper discusses the development of a Dutch national identity in the 17th century Dutch Republic, as evidenced in both the archaeological and historical records, and how this identity persisted with some variation in the West India Company colonies of New Netherland and St. Eustatius. By the early 1600s, a common Dutch identity rooted in the shared values of pragmatism, cleanliness, self-interest, Calvinist morality tempered by an appreciation for material comforts, and a conviction in the...


Frontier Access in East Tennessee: A Ceramic Analysis of Ramsey House (40KN120), Bell Site (40KN202), and Exchange Place (40SL22) (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Abby J. Naunheimer.

Three frontier-era East Tennessee homesteads were chosen to conduct ceramic analyses as a beginning point of understanding consumer access. Ramsey House, Bell Site, and Exchange Place were each occupied beginning in the late 18th century and continued into the first quarter of the 19th century.  The results of examining household ceramics, newspaper advertisements, and day book transactions suggest frontier-era East Tennessee residents were unfairly portrayed as disconnected, non-consumers. The...


The Global, the Local, and the Personal: Searching for Meaning and Relevancy Through Baltimore’s Past (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adam Fracchia.

This is an abstract from the "The Transformation of Historical Archaeology: Papers in Honor of Charles E Orser, Jr" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In his study of the modern world, Charles Orser has suggested that archaeologists should dig locally, but think globally.  Relating different scales across space and time allows for an understanding of the linkages between the past and the present and the connectivity of the modern world.  Through...


Globalization and Heritage Values (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Neil Brodie.

The existence of different heritage values is well-established. For centuries, cultural objects have been looted or stolen because of their heritage value, in particular because of their value as art objects. Cultural heritage sites have suffered accordingly. In the rapidly globalizing world of the late-twentieth and early-twenty-first centuries, however, a new set of fundamentalist values relating to ethnic and religious identity have been foregrounded, with no less damaging consequences....


Globalization and world systems as alternative modes of cultural transmission in the eastern China, 5000-2500 BC (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ling Qin. Dorian Q Fuller.

An eastern crescent zone of the Middle to Lower Yangtze and upwards to Shandong can be defined as a zone of Globalization processes in the Neolithic that was eventually broken down into a number of cores in a world system. The globalization model operates through Neolithic networks, that had no clear political centre but nevertheless promoted shared practices and cultural values over large distances. This is illustrated by the spread of food cultures: crops, cooking methods and ceramic...


Globalization in Southeast Asia’s Early Age of Commerce and the Contributions of Maritime Archaeology (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lisa Niziolek. Amanda Respess. Gary Feinman. Laure Dussubieux.

Globalization has become a central concern of anthropology, and recently scholars have debated its definition, origins, and social implications. For example, some contend that it is a process associated with modern times while others argue that the first long-lived networks involving regular, trans-regional trade emerged between East Asia and the Mediterranean around AD 1000, and even earlier with other regions. It has become increasingly evident, based on a growing corpus of data, that...


The Globalized World of a French Canadian in Spanish and Indian Territory:  The Life of Louis Blanchette, Founder of St. Charles, Missouri.  (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Steve Dasovich.

Louis Blanchette was driven from his home by the British during the French and Indian War.  He settled in Spanish territory (now the state of Missouri) where the predominant languages were French along with multiple Indian languages.  He married an Indian woman, bought British goods, and, as Civil Commandant, reported to a Spanish Lieutenant Governor.  Through historical research and archaeological investigation of his homestead site in St. Charles, Missouri, we can show the public how...


Globalizing Lifeways: An Analysis of Local and Imported Ceramics at an Aku Site in Banjul, The Gambia. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rosemary Hammack.

Following the 1807 British abolition of the slave trade, the West African coast saw the rise of a new phenomenon: the liberation of captive Africans found aboard illegal slaving ships and their resettlement in Sierra Leone and The Gambia. This diaspora group became known as the Liberated Africans, and eventually transformed into the creole ethnic group known as the Aku in The Gambia. After its establishment in 1816 Bathurst (now Bathurst) welcomed the Liberated Africans as a source of low-paid...


Globalizing Poverty:  The Materiality of International Inequality and Marginalization (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Paul R. Mullins. Timo Ylimaunu.

North American historical archaeology has long focused on poverty and consumer marginalization, but models of impoverishment and inequality constructed to address a distinct range of US contexts are not always useful in international contexts.  A wave of recent archaeological scholarship has focused on the materiality of poverty, and an examination of impoverishment is productively complicated by international research comparisons.  This paper examines case studies from African America, British...


Identifying Genogeographic Affiliation of Burials from an 18th Century Cemetery on Sint Eustatius, Dutch Caribbean (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea Wanstead. Melinda Rogers.

This is an abstract from the "Exploring Globalization and Colonialism through Archaeology and Bioarchaeology: An NSF REU Sponsored Site on the Caribbean’s Golden Rock (Sint Eustatius)" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. During the 18th century, Sint Eustatius (Statia) was the home to colonial Europeans, including Dutch, British and French, as well as enslaved and freed individuals of African descent. This research explores the genogeographic...


Picturing Consumption: An Examination of Drinking Establishments Through Images and Material Culture from Late 17th Century London (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephanie N Duensing.

This paper aims to explore the impact of globalization and immigration on late seventeenth-century London.  Through the examination of patters of consumption practiced within various drinking establishments –  alehouses, taverns and coffee houses –  a striking relationship is revealed between social issues/identities and the importation of exotic goods. The imprints of these consumables are represented in both the material and historical records. Frequent depictions of these spaces through...


"There and Back Again": The Atlantic World Concept in Historical Archaeology (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Chesney.

The concept of an "Atlantic World" is a useful one for historical archaeologists because it provides a general geographic starting point for investigations that focus on the transformation of the world and the expansion of European imperial networks but defies strict physical, temporal, and cultural boundaries. As the limits of the known world expanded for Europeans and non-Europeans alike, its mysterious edges contracted, and people and places isolated from outside developments became...