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Globalizing Lifeways: An Analysis of Local and Imported Ceramics at an Aku Site in Banjul, The Gambia.

Author(s): Rosemary Hammack

Year: 2016

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Summary

Following the 1807 British abolition of the slave trade, the West African coast saw the rise of a new phenomenon: the liberation of captive Africans found aboard illegal slaving ships and their resettlement in Sierra Leone and The Gambia. This diaspora group became known as the Liberated Africans, and eventually transformed into the creole ethnic group known as the Aku in The Gambia. After its establishment in 1816 Bathurst (now Bathurst) welcomed the Liberated Africans as a source of low-paid labor. Many of the Aku went on to hold positions of prominence in the colony. During the summer of 2014 as part of the Banjul Heritage Project, excavations were carried out at a property belonging to one of the more influential Aku families in the 19th century. This poster focuses on the influence of globalization on Aku lifeways, evidenced by the imported and local ceramics recovered from the site.


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Globalizing Lifeways: An Analysis of Local and Imported Ceramics at an Aku Site in Banjul, The Gambia.. Rosemary Hammack. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Washington, D.C. 2016 ( tDAR id: 434839)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 268

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America