Chinese diaspora (Other Keyword)

1-10 (10 Records)

"The Awakening Came with the Railroad": The history and archaeology of Southern Oregon’s Chinese Railroad Workers (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea E. Rose.

On December 17, 1887, the final spike connecting the railroad between Oregon and California was driven in Ashland, Oregon.  Like earlier railroads, this track was largely constructed by Chinese workers.  However, due to experience and expertise, these men were able to demand better pay and working conditions than their earlier counterparts. Upon completion, the railroad continued to provide economic opportunities for Chinese residents in Southern Oregon. The Wah Chung Company supplied goods,...


Community Networks at the Stanford Arboretum Chinese Workers’ Quarters (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Lowman.

The historical response and endurance of Chinese diaspora communities in California, living with legally reified racism, is a critical component of understanding the economic and social impacts of immigration restriction. Between 1876 and 1925, the Chinese employees at the Stanford Stock Farm and Stanford University impacted the development of agriculture and infrastructure through their labor and entrepreneurship as farm workers, in construction, as gardeners, and as domestic workers. Over that...


Exploring Age in the Chinese Diaspora (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Dale.

While the archaeology of the Chinese diaspora has grown and expanded to incorporate numerous realms of study, most work has continued to focus on ethnicity as the key marker of Chinese identity, culture, and artifacts. More recently, archaeologists have explored the intersectionality of gender and ethnicity and class and ethnicity at Chinese sites. Age, however, is underexplored throughout archaeology in general, and completely unaddressed in archaeological research into the Chinese diaspora....


From Local Cemeteries to the Global Circulation of Social Imaginaries: Changing Forms of and Forums for Solidarity in Chinese Diaspora Communities, 1850-1960 (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ani Chenier.

Along with large-scale trade and migration, 19th and early 20th century globalization was marked by the circulation, transformation, and global integration of social imaginaries, and the resulting development of structures that would ultimately channel and constrict further movements. The expansion of Chinese diaspora communities across the Pacific and into the Americas was one of the major population movements of this period. The networks that made it possible for individuals to participate in...


Hidden in Plain Sight: Remapping Spatial Networks and Social Complexity of the Chinese Immigrant Mining Diaspora in Southern Oregon (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea E. Rose.

Like other aspects of Western historiography, the story of the Chinese diaspora in the gold fields has been circumscribed by exotic tales of vice, violence, and alienation.  The legacy of frontier rhetoric has continued to impact scholarship through assumptions of scarcity, isolation, and discrimination.  While discriminatory laws and racial tensions certainly impacted the lives of the nineteenth century Chinese living in southern Oregon, they did not wholly define them.  This paper will...


Many Ways of Working: Archaeological Methods at the Arboretum Chinese Quarters, Stanford, California (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Lowman.

Farmers, gardeners, builders, cooks, janitors, launderers, restaurant-owners: the Chinese diaspora community in nineteenth century Stanford, California, was made up of men, and a few women, who took on many ways of working to support themselves, their families, and their communities. Their integral role in the development of the Bay Area’s infrastructure is sometimes obscured because of systematic exclusion, destruction, and erasure in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Because...


Old Lumber is Missing: Artifacts from Stanford's Chinese Communities (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Lowman.

As development in Silicon Valley fills what appears to be empty land, it is crucial to question how land became "empty." In the absence of memorials, other physical traces must be considered as legacies. This is the case with the Chinese employees who lived and worked at what became Stanford University, itself made possible by Chinese workers on the Transcontinental Railroad. Living on the campus at the turn of the twentieth century, the Chinese employees impacted the development of agriculture,...


One Artifact, Multiple Interpretations: Postcolonial Archaeology and the Analysis of Chinese Coins (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Edward Gonzalez-Tennant.

This paper examines how a focus on "culturally bounded" groups restricts historical archaeology’s exploration of oppressive social practices such as slavery, racism, and inequality. Competing interpretations of a single class of material culture – in this case, Chinese coins – illuminates how bias enters archaeological interpretations in subtle ways. Chinese coins, also known as wen have been recovered from historic sites on nearly every continent.  The author focuses on the interpretation of...


A Piece of Salted Snakehead and Its Implications for the Nineteenth-Century Chinese Diaspora Fish Trade (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only J Ryan Kennedy. Leland Rogers.

This is an abstract from the "One of a Kind: Approaching the Singular Artifact and the Archaeological Imagination" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. Archaeologists have traditionally relied upon large datasets to investigate historical fishing industries, the distribution of fish products, and the effect of fishing on the environment. Such studies make critical contributions to understandings of past fisheries; however, not all fish stories require...


Why "Chinese Diaspora" Is More Than Just An Ethnic Label (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Ross.

Some scholars, myself included, have recently argued in favour of a shift from "Overseas Chinese" to "Chinese Diaspora" as the most appropriate name for our field of study. But are we simply substituting one interchangeable ethnic label for another in accordance with intellectual trends? I argue that the term "diaspora" can potentially unite our disparate research interests because it brings with it a valuable body of theory that helps us understand the process of overseas Chinese migration and...