antebellum (Other Keyword)

1-8 (8 Records)

From Big House to Farm House: 100 Years at Arcadia Mill's Simpson Lot (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adrianne B Sams.

The Simpson House at Arcadia Mill Archaeological Site in northwest Florida represents the high-status residence within a multi-ethnic antebellum community organized by hierarchy, race, and possibly gender. On a bluff overlooking the water-powered mill complex, the big house consisted of a three-story Louisiana-style mansion with a brick basement, veranda and main floor, and a second story. The Simpson House was constructed ca. 1835 and survived the Civil War including a short occupation by...


Industrial Community Organization in Antebellum West Florida (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Adrianne B Sams.

Antebellum industrialization in West Florida fostered diverse settlements associated with water-powered mill complexes. Abundant natural resources and desirable landscape characteristics provided an ideal setting for silvicultural pursuits as opposed to agrarian endeavors that relied heavily on suitable soils. Mill seats represent unique landscapes that differ from agrarian settings, affecting community organization for multi-ethnic, hierarchical populations. Arcadia Mill (1830-1855) developed...


Inequality in the Academy: An Intersectional Analysis of Young College Men in 19th Century Lexington, Virginia (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin Schwartz.

What can intersectionality offer to a study of an all-male antebellum dormitory? While this approach has typically been used to identify and combat race- and gender-based discrimination, this paper argues that intersectional theory can also illuminate subtle class- and age-based inequalities among historic individuals of the same gender and race. Archaeological investigation of Graham Hall, a combined dormitory/classroom space/chapel located on the campus of Washington and Lee University in...


Just Another Brick in the Wall: Brick Looting in the Antebellum Lowcountry of South Carolina (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kendy Altizer.

From the colonial period through the twentieth century, brick looting was a common occurrence in the South Carolina Lowcountry. Most accounts are related to the Revolutionary and Civil wars when brick was stolen from ruins or abandoned structures to repair damaged buildings or construct new ones. This study focuses on the built landscape of Peachtree Plantation in St. James Santee Parish, South Carolina. This 450-acre parcel contains the remnants of the second largest plantation house in the...


Personal Adornment in the Context of Antebellum Slavery at Poplar Forest (1830-1858) (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lori Lee.

Objects classified as personal adornment are often vested with meanings that reveal significant insight into their owners because they are personal. The context in which objects are used is critical to understanding potential meanings. This essay considers the recontextualization of personal adornment items, particularly glass beads, a pierced coin, and an alloy fastener, used by enslaved laborers at antebellum Poplar Forest plantation. The enslaved mobilized these forms of material culture in...


Social Geography of Lowcountry Landscapes (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lindsey Cochran.

The comparison of patterns of refuse disposal between populations has been a consistent theme in historical archaeology. The present study acknowledges the impact of the physical environment and social status in shaping how people created and used their built landscape. Triangulation of three kinds of data—spatial, archaeological, and historical—facilitates recognition of the differences or similarities between groups on Sapelo, Ossabaw, and St. Simon’s Islands in the Georgia Lowcountry. A...


Spatiality of the Everyday: 19th Century Slave Life in Western Tennessee (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Claire Norton. Kimberly Kasper. Corena Hasselle.

Throughout ten-years of excavation in western Tennessee, a more nuanced picture of 19th century everyday life in the antebellum South has emerged. With over twenty contiguous plantations on the 18,400-acre contemporary Ames land base, we compare specific characteristics of material culture from large (3,000+ acres) and small plantations (300-1000 acres). Our research focuses on Fanny Dickins, a woman with the financial means to purchase and run a small cotton plantation in Western Tennessee....


Turtles in the Tidewater: an Ecological and Social Perspective on Turtle Consumption in the Antebellum South (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Meagan Dennison. Eric G. Schweickart.

This presentation considers the foodways of plantation inhabitants in the antebellum costal South with reference to one particular food resource, the turtle.  Turtle remains represent a small but ubiquitous portion of faunal assemblages recovered from late 18th and early 19th century sites in the southern states, and historic documents indicate that antebellum Americans drew upon European, African, and Native American cooking traditions to create a turtle-based cuisine which played an important...