Japanese (Other Keyword)

1-7 (7 Records)

Chawan and Yunomi: Japanese Tablewares Recovered from Three Issei Communities in the American West (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Renae J. Campbell.

Japanese-manufactured ceramics from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have been recovered from a variety of archaeological sites throughout Western North America, but large collections and in-depth analyses of pre-World War II assemblages are still relatively rare.  As a result, standardized formal, temporal, and functional typologies are only just emerging and site comparisons are often difficult.  This paper presents a synthesis of ceramic data from three west coast sites...


Community Archaeology at the Heart Mountain Relocation Camp, Park County, Wyoming (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only J. Gregory Smith. Lawrence Todd. Brian Liesinger.

Heart Mountain was one of ten confinement camps established by the U.S. government during World War Two to incarcerate Japanese Americans living on the West Coast of the United States. Located in northwest Wyoming, the camp had a peak population of nearly 11,000 incarcerees, making it the third largest settlement in the state at that time. The Park County Historic Preservation Commission recently partnered with the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center to carry out mapping and test excavations at...


Ethnic Markers and Comparative Approaches to the Asian Diaspora (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas Ross.

Direct comparisons between Chinese and non-Chinese sites go back decades. However, most current Asian diaspora archaeology focuses on single-household or single-community case studies, with comparative work limited to using ethnically-linked artifacts to explore patterns of cultural persistence and change or present evidence for interethnic interaction with neighboring communities. Here, I argue that we need to spend more time conducting direct and detailed comparisons between households and...


Expressions of Ethnicity in a Modern World, Archaeological and Historical Traces of Pre-WWII Japanese-American Culture (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lorelea Hudson.

Artifacts and structures produce data for historical archaeology. They can be used to construct chronologies, explore social arrangements, and identify function and ethnic groups.  Japanese men came as laborers to the Pacific Northwest in the late 19th century, working in logging camps, on the railroad, and in other industrial settings. By the early 20th century, Japanese families (re)turned to farming as they sought greater economic opportunity. Two such first generation Japanese families, the...


Identifying Japanese Ceramic Forms and their Use in the American West (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Renae J. Campbell.

Japanese ceramics from the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries have been recovered from a variety of archaeological contexts throughout Western North America, but large collections or in-depth analyses of these materials are relatively rare.  As a result, standardized formal, temporal, and functional typologies are only just emerging and site comparisons are often difficult.  This paper presents the preliminary results of a synthesis of ceramic data from several large collections of...


Palimpsests and Practices: Preliminary Thoughts on the Landscape as a Mediator of Political and Social Meaning at Barneston, Washington (1898-1924) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David R Carlson.

The landscapes of sawmill company towns are complex palimpsests formed from an array of practices and structures that influenced daily life. They served as sites of socioeconomic order, industry, inequality, and persistence for a diverse array of inhabitants. This paper will explore the complex and multi-vocal nature of such landscapes through a multi-scalar analysis of the spatial organization and context of a first-generation Japanese American (Issei) community at Barneston, Washington...


Reanalysis of the Japanese Gulch Village Collection: Japanese Ceramics Recovered from a Pacific Northwest Issei Community (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Renae J. Campbell.

Japanese Gulch Village, located on the Mukilteo Lumber Company complex in Washington State, was home to a community of Issei millworkers and their families between 1903 and 1930.  Excavations conducted in the vicinity of this village in 2007 recovered a large archaeological collection that included at least 100 Japanese-manufactured ceramic vessels.  This paper presents a reanalysis of a selection of these vessels using an expanded typology specific to historical Japanese table- and sake wares....