Refugees (Other Keyword)

1-9 (9 Records)

350 Years after the Conquest: British Influences on a Multiethnic Refugee Maya Community (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Meierhoff.

This is an abstract from the "After Cortés: Archaeological Legacies of the European Invasion in Mesoamerica" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In the late-nineteenth century, Maya refugees fleeing the violence of the Caste War of Yucatan (1847-1901) briefly reoccupied the ancient Maya ruins of Tikal. Unlike the numerous Yucatec refugee communities established to the east in British Honduras, those who settled at Tikal combined with Lacandon Maya, and...


An Archaeological Examination of Cookware from the Storm Wreck, 8SJ5459 (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Annie E. Carter.

The Storm wreck is an 18th-century Loyalist shipwreck located off St. Augustine, Florida. The shipwreck excavation has been an ongoing focus of the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP) since 2009. An examination of the iron and copper cookware present on site offers an entryway for the analysis and interpretation of Loyalist intentions and lifeways. These goods were once part of a colonial, capitalistic society and were key items for survival in an intermediary and uncertain time...


The Archaeological Investigation of the Storm Wreck, a Wartime Refugee Vessel Lost at St. Augustine, Florida at the End of the Revolutionary War: Overview of the 2010-2015 Excavation Seasons (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolane Veilleaux. Chuck Meide.

The Storm Wreck, site number 8SJ5459, was discovered in 2009 by the Lighthouse Archaeological Maritime Program (LAMP), about a mile offshore St. Augustine, Florida. It has been excavated every year since then in conjunction with LAMP’s underwater archaeology field school. A wide range of artifacts has been recovered, including ordnance, firearms, ship’s equipment, tools and hardware, personal effects, and household items, and are now being conserved at the St. Augustine Lighthouse & Maritime...


Bang Bang! Cannons, Carronades, and the Gun Carriage from the Storm Wreck (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Chuck T Meide.

The Storm Wreck, one of sixteen Loyalist refugee ships from Charleston lost on the St. Augustine Bar on 31 December 1782, has been excavated for six seasons, 2010-2015. In December 2010, a pile of four 4-pdr cannons and two 9-pdr carronades was encountered on the wreck site, where they were seemingly jettisoned in an attempt to refloat the ship after it grounded. Two of these guns were raised in 2011 for conservation and display. The carronade, whose serial number has been found in Carron...


Constructing National Belonging After the 1947 Partition of India and Pakistan: a Case Study of Delhi’s Refugee Resettlement Housing (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin P Riggs.

This is an abstract from the "Exploring the Recent Past" session, at the 2019 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology. In an increasingly mobile world, the places most central to peoples' identities are often modern and fluid, as opposed to fixed and related to historic origins. This paper discusses 1947 Partition refugee resettlement housing in Delhi which was an important site of national identity construction. Following Indian independence, the millions of refugees who...


Consumer Culture at the 19th century Maya refugee site at Tikal, Guatemala (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Meierhoff.

In the mid-nineteenth century Maya refugees fleeing the violence of the Caste War of Yucatan (1857-1901) briefly reoccupied the ancient Maya ruins of Tikal, Guatemala. These Yucatec speaking refugees combined with Lacandon Maya, and later Ladinos from Lake Petén Itza to form a small, multi-ethnic village in the sparsely occupied Petén jungle of northern Guatemala. The following paper will discuss the recent archaeological investigation of the historic refugee village at Tikal, with a focus on...


Nineteenth Century Maya Refugees and the Reoccupation of Tikal, Guatemala (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Meierhoff. Lorena Paiz.

After nearly millennia of isolation and abandonment, Tikal, the once mighty city of the ancient Classic Maya, was briefly reoccupied by Maya refugees fleeing the violence of the Caste War of Yucatan (1847-1901). While small, this village was comprised of a conglomeration of at least three different Maya speaking groups, seeking safety and autonomy in the frontier zone of the dense and sparsely occupied Petén Jungle. This remote region was exploited for centuries by groups escaping...


No Direction Home; Refining the Date of Occupation at Tikal’s 19th Century Refugee Village. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Meierhoff.

In the latter half of the 19th Century, the ancient Maya ruined city Tikal was briefly reoccupied.  The frontier village was established some time before 1875, and had a maximum population of 15 households comprised of at least three distinct Maya speaking groups.  However, the site was again abandoned when archaeologists visited Tikal in 1881.  Most of the inhabitants were reportedly said to be Yucatec refugees fleeing the violence and upheavals of the Caste War of Yucatan (1847-1901) that...


Provisioning a 19th Century Maya Refugee Village; Consumer Culture at Tikal, Guatemala. (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Meierhoff.

In the late-nineteenth century Maya refugees fleeing the violence of the Caste War of Yucatan (1847-1901) briefly reoccupied the ancient Maya ruins of Tikal.  Unlike the numerous Yucatec refugee communities established to the east in British Honduras, those who settled at Tikal combined with Lacandon Maya, and later Ladinos from Lake Petén Itza to form a small, multiethnic village in the sparsely occupied Petén jungle of northern Guatemala.  This paper discusses the analysis of the mass-produced...