Bioarchaeology/Skeletal Analysis (Other Keyword)

1-25 (310 Records)

3D Geometric Morphometrics Applied in the Identification of Canis spp. specimen from a Historic Site in Western Texas (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lila Jones. Eileen Johnson.

Whiskey Flats, an archaeological site on the Llano Estacado (western Texas), is dated to the mid-18th century and represents Comanche occupation. Ongoing fieldwork has produced a vertebrate assemblage that includes coyote (Canis latrans) and a larger canid (Canis spp.) of a species that remains undetermined. The species of canids that may have been present at the time of deposition are grey wolf (C. lupus), coyote, domestic dog (C. lupus familiaris), and possibly red wolf (C. rufus). The Canis...


Across the Lake: Interregional Connections with the Tiwanaku Occupation of Copacabana (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara L. Juengst. David Hansen. Sergio Chavez. Stanislava Chavez.

Tiwanaku, the first expansive state in the southern Andes, established colonies in many parts of the Andes (Moquegua, the Atacama Desert, Cochabamba) and exerted influence over the southern Titicaca basin. Archaeologists have recreated daily life for people living in these places, producing many insightful studies of Tiwanaku diet, cultural bodily modifications, disease, and occasional incidents of trauma. Many colonists living far from the Tiwanaku heartland developed hybrid lifestyles,...


Acts of God? Causation and Agency in Disease History (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Inskip. John Robb.

Epidemics are often understood both by historians and by ancient people as "acts of God" which structure human lives but originate outside systemic causation, and are simply caused by the advent of pathogens. But no simple model of unidirectional causation, whether by natural agents or humans, really does justice to the situation. Disease responds to social and biological environments (for instance, settlement distributions affecting contagion, and poverty and malnutrition compromising the...


Analysis of Anatomical Dissection at Point San Jose Hospital, Fort Mason, San Francisco (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mallory Peters. Jessica Curry. Eric Bartelink.

During a 2010 National Park Service project to remove lead contaminated soils from behind a historic hospital at Point San Jose (now Fort Mason), San Francisco, a medical waste pit containing commingled human and faunal remains was discovered. From 1864-1903, several military surgeons were posted at the Point San Jose Hospital to treat military personnel. Analysis of the human remains revealed evidence of anatomical dissection indicated by numerous incised cut marks, saw cut marks, and other...


An Analysis of Fetal Remains Discovered in a New York Privy (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shayna Murphy. Kenneth Nystrom. Jennifer Geraghty. Adam Luscier.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The remains of a thirty-six week old fetus were uncovered during the excavation of a privy on the Sargent Street site located in Cohoes, New York. Discovered in a 19th century town inhabited with textiles mill workers and their families, the skeleton was fragmentary and consisted of only four long bones. The context of these remains are unique and represents...


Analyzing Stress, Discovering Cooperation: A case study of a Late Archaic sample from the Green River region of Kentucky (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna-Marie Casserly. Briana Moore.

This is an abstract from the "Cooperative Bodies: Bioarchaeology and Non-ranked Societies" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. While considerable portions of bioarchaeological work have been dedicated to examining evidence of violence and conflict, little research has been devoted to understanding collaboration in the past. Analysis of stress biomarkers, particularly that which utilizes an osteobiographical approach, provides one potential avenue for...


Animal, Human, and Crafted Bone from the S-Sector of Piedras Negras (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joshua Schnell. Sarah Newman. Andrew Scherer.

Excavations within the S-Sector at Piedras Negras in 2016 yielded an assemblage of lithic and bone artifacts consistent with evidence of craft production. The Proyecto Paisaje Piedras Negras – Yaxchilan returned to the S-Sector during the 2017 field season to conduct more extensive excavations in an attempt to understand production and exchange at this Maya polity capital. Between the 2016 and 2017 seasons, over 4,300 fragments of worked and unworked bone, both human and animal, were excavated...


Apotguan Revisited: A Bioarchaeological Analysis of Latte Period Burials from Guam (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Rona Ikehara-Quebral. Judith McNeill. Michele Toomay Douglas. Michael Pietrusewsky.

This is an abstract from the "Research and CRM Are Not Mutually Exclusive: J. Stephen Athens—Forty Years and Counting" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Cultural Resources Management studies in the Mariana Islands have consistently expanded opportunities for in-depth bioarchaeological research. Burial assemblages originating from historic preservation compliance obligations generally derive from one of three contexts: displaced fragmentary remains;...


Application of Multi-Isotopic Analysis (δ13C, δ15N, and δ34S) to Examine Mobility and Movement of People and Animals within an Iron Age British Society (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Derek Hamilton. Kerry Sayle. Colin Haselgrove. Gordon Cook.

The middle of the Iron Age in southern central Britain (c. 400–200 cal BC) is a period that is often seen as becoming regionally inward-looking. A primary focus of the mixed agriculturalists is on building and maintaining massive hillforts. There is very little long-distance exchange or trade noted in the archaeological record, and the metalwork at the time takes on insular forms (e.g. involuted brooches) that separate it from the Continental connections observable in both the Early and Late...


Archaeology of Death across the International Border: Research among the Hohokam and Trincheras Archaeological Groups (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica Cerezo-Román.

This is an abstract from the "The Future of Bioarchaeology in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In this paper, I will explore similarities and differences between mortuary practices and concepts of embodiment of the dead from Hohokam Classic Period (AD 1150 to 1450/1500) sites in the Tucson Basin and from the Cerro de Trincheras, Sonora (ca. AD 1300 to 1450). I will discuss challenges and opportunities for conducting bioarchaeology...


Archaeothanatological Analysis of Mortuary Practices in the Prehistoric Sonoran Desert and Implications for Interpreting Sickness through Postmortem Processing (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jordan Krummel. James Watson.

The La Playa archaeological site in the Sonoran Desert represents one of the earliest agricultural settlements in northwest Mexico. Over 310 mortuary features have been uncovered during salvage excavations since the site was discovered in 1930, revealing a wide variability in mortuary practices that may reflect specific treatments for pathological or transgressive individuals after death. This paper describes analyses of burials uncovered during the 2017 field season utilizing the...


The articulation of the dead; understanding expatriation, materiality and voice in the process of repatriation. (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dorothy Lippert.

This is an abstract from the "The Future of Bioarchaeology in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Bioarchaeologists assert the responsibility to give voice to the dead, but the dead exist in many different definitions. As ancestors, they are part of an existing human community, as objects, they are part of a created community of collections. They can also be sources of data for researchers seeking to expand knowledge about human existence....


Assessing Malaria Risk in 19th Century Tucson, Arizona (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeremy Pye.

Malaria is thought to have been brought to the Americas by early Spanish explorers. By the late 19th century, malaria had spread through human populations throughout tropical and temperate areas of the Americas, including the American Southwest. Historical documents, maps, and modern GIS data layers (e.g., DEM, soils, vegetation, land use, streams) from the area around Tucson, Arizona, were consulted and entered into ArcGIS (v.10) in order to produce a map of potential vector breeding locations...


Asymmetry of Cranial Surface in Relation to Social Stratification in Great Moravia (Early Medieval Period, Mikulčice, Czech Republic, 9th–10th Century) (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jana Veleminska. Jan Dupej. Jaroslav Bruzek. Lumir Polacek. Petr Veleminsky.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. According to the archaeological and written sources Great Moravian Medieval society was highly socially stratified. Recorded differences in facial cranial morpholology were partly interpreted as a result of different masticatory load, and thus of different dietary habits in various socioeconomic classes. In this study we present a detailed analysis of cranial...


The Battle of the Little Bighorn Gunshot Trauma Analysis: Suicide Prevalence Among the Soldiers of the 7th Cavalry (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Genevieve Mielke.

The Battle of the Little Bighorn cost the U.S. army 268 men, which accounted for just over one percent of its entirety. Many of the men were killed during battle by Native American firearms and bow and arrows (Scott et. al, 2002, pg. 12). It is possible that some men perished by their own hand or by friendly fire. Through osteological data provided by the State Historic Preservation Office of Montana as well as historical documentation, this presentation will provide an analysis of gunshot wound...


Becoming Cypriot: Identity Formation, Negotiation and Renegotiation on Bronze Age Cyprus (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Osterholtz.

This is an abstract from the "Pushing the Envelope, Chasing Stone Age Sailors and Early Agriculture: Papers in Honor of the Career of Alan H. Simmons" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Work on Cypriot identity has a long history, beginning with the identification of the first Cypriots during the Neolithic. This presentation continues on in the direction begun by Alan Simmons at Ais Giorkis of examining physical remains to understand what it meant to...


Belonging and Exclusion in Early Colonial Huamanga (Ayacucho), Peru: An Isotopic, Religious and Archival View (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ellen Lofaro. George Kamenov. Jorge Luis Soto Maguino. John Krigbaum.

Built in AD 1605, La Iglesia de la Compañía de Jesus de Huamanga is the earliest Jesuit church in modern-day Ayacucho, Peru. Archaeological excavations underneath the church floor uncovered human and faunal remains dating to the 17th and 18th centuries CE. Only indigenous individuals appear to be buried underneath the church floors. Despite significant forced labor practices (mita) at the time, few individuals buried in the church show signs of bodily stress or disease prevalent in those engaged...


The Bethel Cemetery Relocation Project: Academic Collaboration, Archaeological Science, and CRM (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ryan Peterson. Alex Badillo. Joshua Meyers. Jeremy Wilson.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeological Science Outside the Ivory Tower: Perspectives from CRM" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Bethel Cemetery project combined the best of what the CRM and University communities have to offer, while documenting, exhuming, and relocating over 500 graves from a 19th century cemetery in Indianapolis, IN on an aggressive schedule. Over 30 professionals from the University of Indianapolis and IUPUI were...


Bioarchaeological Analysis of a Historic North Carolina Family Cemetery (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Madison Long. Megan Perry.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Gause Cemetery at Seaside, located in Sunset Beach, North Carolina, purportedly contains members of a wealthy and influential planter family, the Gause’s, who died during the late 18th and early 19th centuries. In 2017, a Gause descendant requested excavation of the cemetery by East Carolina University as part of an extensive genealogical project that will...


Bioarchaeological Analysis of Human Skeletal Remains from the Historic First Baptist Church Cemetery, Philadelphia (ca. 1700–1860): Preliminary Results (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jared Beatrice. George Leader. Kimberlee Moran. Anna Dhody.

The inadvertent discovery of the historic First Baptist Church of Philadelphia cemetery resulted in the recovery of a large sample of human skeletons composed of commingled remains as well as discrete individuals associated with intact coffins. Analysis of the skeletal remains prior to reburial provides insight into demography, behavior, and living conditions among members of this congregation interred circa 1700-1860. While preservation of the remains is variable within the cemetery,...


Bioarchaeological and Mortuary Indicators of Social Order in Mimbres Society: Seated Burials, Occupational Stress, Health, and Trauma (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathryn Baustian.

This is an abstract from the "Cooperative Bodies: Bioarchaeology and Non-ranked Societies" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Mimbres culture of the American Southwest is most recognized for its beautiful black-on-white ceramics but recent research is revealing greater understanding of social organization, community interactions, and the response to social and cultural change. Bioarchaeological and mortuary data are contributing important evidence...


A Bioarchaeological Approach to Contested Mountain Landscapes in Transylvania’s Golden Quadrangle (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Colin Quinn. Jess Beck.

This is an abstract from the "Living and Dying in Mountain and Highland Landscapes" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. In this paper, we introduce the agenda for the session Living and Dying in Mountain and Highland Landscapes. Mountains and high altitude areas are ideal spaces where archaeologists can examine the relationship between social action and the environment. As this session will show, the study of human remains must be situated with a...


A Bioarchaeological Approach to the Social Construction of Community Identities in Mountain Landscapes (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara Marsteller.

This is an abstract from the "Living and Dying in Mountain and Highland Landscapes" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The Huarochirí Manuscript has made legendary the social relationships of pre-Columbian groups inhabiting the Andean mountain landscape that ascends steeply from the present-day coastal capital city of Lima, Peru, to the high-altitude Huarochirí Province. In this famous collection of ethnohistoric narratives, authored in the indigenous...


Bioarchaeological Approaches to Investigating Supply, Demand and Authenticity in the Colonial-era Human Remains Trade (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Damien Huffer. Shawn Graham.

During the Colonial era, numerous "trophy skulls" from various Indo-Pacific cultures entered Western museum and private collections, and continue to be sought as "authentic" collector’s items. However, very little bioarchaeological research exists investigating their provenience, intra-cultural variation in decoration and manufacture, and how examples created for Indigenous ritual use differed from those created for sale to Colonial explorers at the beginning of ‘curio’ trade, let alone what...


Bioarchaeological Ethics and Considerations for the Deceased (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jayne-Leigh Thomas. Krystiana Krupa.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The last few decades have brought changes to archaeology through the establishment of ethics codes, repatriation, and community-based, participatory research. However, established ethical codes are often unfamiliar to researchers and the treatment of human remains continues to be unequal, while scientific justifications for doing bioarchaeological research are...