Subsistence and Foodways (Other Keyword)

1-25 (284 Records)

Across Boundaries: Origin of Microblade Technology in NE Asia under a Macroecological Approach (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Meng Zhang.

This is an abstract from the "Archaeology on the Edge(s): Transitions, Boundaries, Changes, and Causes" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The spread of microblade technology has been explained using human migration and cultural transmission under the culture-historical paradigm of a "refugium model" that illustrates movements of foraging societies from Transbaikal eastward to the Paleo-Sakhalin-Hokkaido-Kurile (PSHK) Peninsula and to North China in...


Adventures of the Mountain Hare: An Ancient DNA Study (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra Jamieson. Greger Larson.

This is an abstract from the "HumAnE Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Mountain hares today can be found from Scandinavia to Eastern Russia with isolated populations in Ireland, Scotland and the Alps. While their modern distribution is well understood, the extent of their past range and interactions with humans remains unknown. The primary aim of my research is to assess the natural and human-aided distribution of mountain hares across...


Agricultural Practices in the Atacama Desert (Northern Chile): New Perspectives from Stable Isotope Analysis on Archaeological Crops (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Francisca Santana Sagredo. Julia Lee-Thorp. Rick Schulting. Mauricio Uribe. Chris Harrod.

This is an abstract from the "Challenges and Future Directions in Plant Stable Isotope Analysis in Archaeology" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Agricultural practice began in arid northern Chile during the Formative Period just prior to 1000 yr BC. Unusually, preservation of crops, including maize, squash, quinoa and beans is excellent due to the extremely arid conditions that characterise the Atacama Desert. In order to explore crop management,...


Agricultural Wealth, Food Storage, and Commensal Politics at Azoria an Archaic City on Crete (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Margaret Scarry. Margaret Mook. Donald Haggis.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Azoria (630-480 BC) is a small urban center on the island of Crete. Ten seasons of large-scale excavations have shed light on the formation, organization and operation of this Archaic city. At its heart is a massive civic complex with shrines, assembly halls, public dining rooms with associated kitchens and storerooms, a large free-standing storehouse, and an...


Agriculture and Resource Procurement for the Castro Settlements of NW Iberia: Examination of Floatation Samples for the Castro Site of Bagunte (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia Neuhoff-Malorzo.

Collection and examination of botanical remains has led to evidence of the development of agriculture in conjunction with the collection or procurement of wild resources at a number of Castro sites across the NW of Portugal and Galicia. Evidence procured to date from a number of such sites stretching from the Galician Region of Spain to the site of Monte Mozinho near the municipality of Penafiel in Portugal covers a span of time from Early Bronze Age to Roman Period and exhibits a combination...


Alternative Recipes: Exploring the Diversity of Foods Prepared in Prehistoric Earth Oven Cooking (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Molly Carney.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Camas (Camassia spp.) was among the most important foods for many cultural groups of the Pacific Northwest in the past. The Pend Oreille Valley in northeastern Washington and the Kalispel people were particularly known for their large camas fields and the archaeological record of the valley is replete with earth oven features. Archaeological site 45PO422,...


An Analysis of Garbanzo Bean Remains at Mission San Luis de Talimali (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Taylor Townsend.

This is an abstract from the "First Floridians to La Florida: Recent FSU Investigations" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Were garbanzo beans grown at San Luis de Talimali or were they imported? Were they able to be cultivated at all in a Floridian climate? Who cooked with the beans- just the wealthy Spanish who imported them or anyone with a garden? What was their dietary importance? Garbanzo beans were a staple of the Spanish diet, and were one of...


Analysis of Sorting Errors of Animal Remains from Shell Middens: Lessons Learned from the Čḯxwicən Project (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kristine Bovy. Virginia L. Butler. Sarah K. Campbell. Michael A. Etnier.

Zooarchaeologists routinely analyze assemblages that were initially sorted into major animal type (birds, mammals, fish, invertebrates) by students or lab technicians with little experience in zooarchaeology. Sorting errors are likely made, which affect taxonomic representation and understanding of human-animal relationships. Recent study of the immense faunal assemblage (over 500,000 NSP) from Čḯxwicən, a 2800-year-old Lower Elwha Klallam village located on the coast of Washington (USA), allows...


Analysis of the Faunal Remains at the Arch Street Cemetery Site (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Allison Grunwald.

Prior to moving the burials within the First Baptist Church of Philadelphia cemetery to a new location in 1860, a local newspaper of the time documented that the neighboring tenement houses used the open space as a dumping ground. Artifacts recovered from this deposit include pottery sherds, pieces of glass bottles, leather shoe soles, metal objects, and the remains of shellfish and domesticated animals. Many of the animal bones show signs of butchery, indicating that the remains are from food...


Analysis of the Lithic Assemblage from Canchas Uckro (1100–800 BC), Eastern Ancash, Peru (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Schroll. Jason Nesbitt. Rachel Johnson. Sadie Weber.

Canchas Uckro is a large platform situated above the Puccha River, and approximately 25 km to the north of Chavín de Huántar. Recent excavations recovered a lithic assemblage consisting of 245 artifacts from stratigraphic layers dating between ca. 1100 and 800 BC. This poster describes the analysis of this lithic assemblage, including raw materials utilized, technological organization, and patterns of tool design in relation to possible subsistence activities. Expedient flakes from locally...


Ancestral Pueblo Agriculture on the Pajarito Plateau: A Geoscience Investigation of Field Terraces in the Northern Mountains of New Mexico (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Hannah Van Vlack. Jamie A. Civitello. Rory P. Gauthier. Robert Powers.

In honor of Robert Powers, Bandelier National Monument (BNM) presents research on his final project investigating agricultural potential in the arid highlands of the American Southwest. Powers’ research was conducted on behalf of the University of New Mexico’s anthropology doctoral program for archaeology. The Park is well-known for its ancestral Pueblo archaeological sites and the unique, natural ecotones throughout the Eastern Jemez Mountains. The region is topographically dynamic; the...


Ancient Human-Animal Interactions in Chachapoyas Region: Isotopic Analysis of Zooarchaeological Remains from Kuelap, Peru (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samantha Michell. Jennifer Marla Toyne. Alfredo Narvaez. Victor Vasquez.

This study uses isotopic analysis of fauna remains as a proxy for reconstructing the ancient Chachapoya environment of the northeastern highlands in Peru. Large middens have been excavated at the monumental center of Kuelap (900-1535 CE), yet there is little previous research focused on the fauna remains at this or other archaeological contexts in the region. The goal of this project was to reconstruct animal resource exploitation and provide insight into dietary variation and environment at...


Ancient Maya Diet, Environment, Animal Use and Exchange at El Mirador: The Zooarchaeological Evidence (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Erin Thornton. Richard Hansen. Edgar Suyuc-Ley.

The site of El Mirador (Petén, Guatemala) is among the largest Preclassic settlements in the Maya lowlands. The site has attracted attention due to its size and antiquity, but also for its location within a region containing few permanent or perennial water sources. This study summarizes current zooarchaeological evidence from the site to assess past diet, habitat use, environment, and exchange. Comparative analysis demonstrates that the inhabitants of El Mirador conformed to certain widespread...


Ancient Maya Land Use: Water Management and Agricultural Production at Actuncan, Belize (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Theresa Heindel.

Research conducted during the 2015-2017 Actuncan Archaeological Project field seasons revealed several land use strategies utilized during the Late and Terminal Classic periods, including terracing, agricultural plots, and cobble mounds. Excavations conducted in the Northern Neighborhood of Actuncan exposed two terracing methods: 1) terraforming, in which earthen berms created to facilitate water drainage and 2) two small agricultural plot systems filled with a large amount of redeposited...


Animal Use among the Monongahela: Insights from the Analysis of the Johnston Site Faunal Assemblage (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Neusius.

Excavations at the Johnston site (36IN2), a Middle Monongahela village located in western Pennsylvania, have generated a large, generally well-preserved assemblage of faunal remains. Between excavations in the 1950s and those conducted since 2005 by IUP, a significant portion of this large ring village has been sampled. Thus, this assemblage provides a rare opportunity to document the use of animals by the Monongahela. Initial faunal analysis was undertaken by John Guilday of the Carnegie Museum...


Animal Use in the Last Maya Kingdom (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dominic Bush.

The archaeological site of Flores is a small, lacustrine island located in Northern Guatemala. Despite lacking in physical size, the island has a lengthy occupational history, dating from the Preclassic Maya period through the present. Flores, which became a provincial capital during the late Postclassic, was able to resist Spanish rule until 1697 AD, making it the last Maya holdout. Given this distinction, the island has been under much archaeological scrutiny and the subject of many...


Apishapa Structures and Subsistence Strategies in Purgatoire Canyon Colorado (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only A. Dudley Gardner.

From 2002 to the present we excavated five Apishapa Structures in the Purgatoire Canyon. This presentation will provide a brief synthesis of structural types and food ways of the sites inhabitants. It appears that maize and a variety of wild plants made up a considerable portion of the Apishapa diet. Analysis of the floral remains from these sites indicate the sites inhabitants relied heavily on available edible plants but also consumed exotics such as pecans. This brief synthesis puts forth our...


Arboriculture, Translocated Flora, and Ecological Inheritance in the Marquesas Islands, East Polynesia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer Huebert. Melinda S. Allen.

Contact-period accounts point to considerable variability in Polynesian agronomic production systems. In the Marquesas Islands, a mountainous island group in the eastern Pacific, food production in the proto-historic period was narrowly focused on tree cropping and breadfruit cultivation in particular. Early western visitors remarked on the archipelago’s large and thriving island populations, and their stable and productive arboricultural systems. In this paper, we present the results of a...


Archaeobotany of Food & Craft near Bono Manso, Ghana, during the Transition from Trans-Saharan to Atlantic Trade (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel Harris. Amanda L. Logan. Anne M. Compton.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Kranka Dada is a village site on the periphery of Bono Manso, a complex polity occupied between the 14th – 17th centuries AD, at the height of the trans-Saharan trade and the shift to early Atlantic trade. Questions remain about the degree and nature of the involvement of sites like Kranka Dada in these different trade networks. In this paper, we offer...


Archaeological Applications of Optimal Foraging Theory: Employing Bayesian probability modeling to estimate profitability parameters for rare and extinct prey (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacob Harris. Andrew Bishop. Christopher Brooke. Kim Hill. Curtis Marean.

This is an abstract from the "Novel Statistical Techniques in Archaeology II (QUANTARCH II)" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Reconstructing the subsistence strategies of past hominin populations remains one of the most important endeavors of archaeological studies. However, the presence and relative frequency of species alone, recovered as faunal material in archaeological contexts, is insufficient to reconstruct the complex foraging decisions made...


Archaeology and Stable Isotope Ecology of the Passenger Pigeon: Tracing the Prehistory of an Extinct Bird (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only T. Cregg Madrigal. Suzanne E. Pilaar Birch.

This is an abstract from the "Human Interactions with Extinct Fauna" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The passenger pigeon, once the most abundant bird in the world, became extinct barely a hundred years ago. It has been assumed that the passenger pigeon was equally abundant prior to the European colonization of North America, but some have argued that the bird was nowhere near as common in prehistory. Because so much of what is known is based on...


Archaeology on the Half Shell: Preliminary Analysis of Shellfish Consumption at Coan Hall (44NB11), Virginia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samantha Upton. Jennifer Green. Barbara Heath.

Coan Hall is the site of the first English settlement on the Northern Neck of Virginia, established by John Mottrom, an English merchant-planter, around 1640. Mottrom resided there with his family, servants, and slaves until his death in 1655. His descendants occupied the house until the early 18th century. It was situated on the banks of the Coan River, a brackish tributary of the Potomac River that empties into the Chesapeake Bay. Representative samples of shellfish, predominantly those of...


Archaic Period MRG-6 and the Deep Culinary Roots of Oaxacan Cuisine (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Shanti Morell-Hart. Éloi Bérubé.

This is an abstract from the "The Archaeology of Oaxacan Cuisine" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The rich cuisine of contemporary Oaxaca sprouted from deep roots. Archaic Period plant remains recovered from the MRG-6 rockshelter enhance prior work at Guila Naquitz and grant us insight into some of the managed and wild food plants still used in contemporary Oaxacan dishes. Over 70 different botanical taxa were identified from samples excavated at...


Assessing Botanical Diversity of Late-to-Terminal Classic Households at Xunantunich, Belize (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessica Devio.

Understanding household plant use can provide a wealth of data about subsistence practices, past agricultural systems, and strategies used to mitigate climatic stress. Plant use may also vary between households. By examining this variation, botanical data may yield further information on personal preference and cuisine differences between households. Aside from consumption for subsistence, plants were used for a wide range of activities conducted by individual households. Botanical datasets may...


Assessing Evidence of Hunting as Subsistence Specialization at an Early Classic Period Hohokam Farmstead (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jacqueline Fox. William Bryce. Andrea Gregory. Travis Cureton.

This is an abstract from the "SAA 2019: General Sessions" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Logan Simpson recently mitigated multiple prehistoric sites along the Middle Gila River in Arizona for the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s Florence Flood Retarding Structure Rehabilitation project. One site, AZ U:15:836(ASM), is a small Hohokam farmstead within the Grewe-Casa Grande canal system. Recent investigations at the site identified evidence...