Dog (Other Keyword)

1-14 (14 Records)

Ambiguous beings: the ontological autonomy of Inuit dogs (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Peter Whitridge.

Part of the attraction of relational ontology is its encouragement to discard conventional epistemological hierarchies. We needn’t frame our investigations with the usual weighty themes – economy, social relations, ideology – but can begin anywhere, with any sort of question, and tug on the thread until the archaeological fabric unravels. Here I begin with dogs, and their relations with humans and other animals in the Inuit past. Inuit had an exceptionally complex relationship with the dogs that...


Beta Activity of the Animal Burials at the Juntunen Site (20 Mk 1) On Bois Blanc Island (1965)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles E. Cleland.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


A Comparison of Dog Shoulder Height in European and Native American Contexts (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Martin Welker. Rebecca Duggan.

Dogs are the only domestic animal to have existed on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean prior to the Columbian Exchange. Historic documents indicate that European colonists to North America brought their own dogs and generally preferred large breeds capable of protecting livestock, hunting, defending settlements from both predators and Native American raids. As early as 1619 the Virginia Assembly banned colonists from trading European dogs to Native Americans, and these policies were quickly...


Deciphering Dog Domestication: A Combined Ancient DNA and Geometric Morphometric Approach (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Linderholm. Ardern Hulme-Beaman. Allowen Evin. Keith Dobney. Greger Larson.

Research into animal domestication has now broadly established the geographic and temporal origins of the major livestock species, but has failed to do so for dogs. We will apply ancient DNA (aDNA) and geometric morphometric (GM) techniques to archaeological canid remains, of which we have examined ~4000 specimens across the globe through multiple time periods. Using this multifaceted approach, we expect population level distinctions revealed by aDNA analyses to be mirrored by GM analyses. This...


Dog-Assisted Hunting Strategies in the Early Holocene Rock Art of Saudi Arabia (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Maria Guagnin. Angela Perri.

The UNESCO world heritage sites of Shuwaymis and Jubbah, in northwestern Saudi Arabia, are extremely rich in early Holocene rock art. Hunting scenes illustrate dog-assisted hunting strategies from the 7th and possibly the 8th millennium BC, predating the spread of pastoralism. The engravings represent the earliest evidence for dogs on the Arabian Peninsula. Though the depicted dogs are reminiscent of the modern Canaan dog, it is unclear if they were brought to the Arabian Peninsula from the...


Extreme Tooth Wear: Understanding Dog Diets in the American Southwest (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Joshua Nowakowski. Chrissina Burke.

Dogs have been described as a refuse management system in prehistoric villages across the world; in fact, much of their domestication has been attributed to their ability to adapt to consume human garbage/waste. Recent research on prehistoric dog burials housed in the Museum of Northern Arizona’s curated faunal collections illustrates unusual tooth wear patterns on both the upper and lower carnassials in a large number of the canids. The wear does not appear to represent excessive gnawing on...


The Horse and Dog in Hidatsa Culture (1924)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Gilbert L. Wilson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Housepit 54: Dogs and their Changing Roles (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Emilia Tifental. Kathryn Bobolinski.

Excavations at the Bridge River site, British Colombia have been on going since 2003. The careful study of these housepits have significantly increased our understanding of the communities that inhabited the Middle Fraser Canyon over 1,000 years ago. The completion of the Housepit 54 excavation has provided further evidence of the many facets of indigenous life at Bridge River; among these is the role of dogs. The possession and many uses of dogs in the Middle Fraser Canyon is well documented...


Insights into Dog Domestication from Psychological Studies on Dog and Wolf Behavior (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Clive Wynne.

The nature of the cognitive similarities and differences between dogs and wolves is highly relevant to considerations of possible mechanisms for the origin of dogs. I shall present results which show that wolves possess the potential to match dogs’ levels of responding adaptively to human actions if the wolves have been carefully hand-reared by people skilled in raising wild animals. Hand-reared wolves match pet dogs’ ability to follow human points to a desired object and to interpret the...


Living on the Edge: Dogs and People in Early New Zealand (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Karen Greig.

New Zealand is situated on the southern margins of the Polynesian triangle in the Pacific Ocean. Its temperate climate and environment differs greatly from the tropical central East Polynesian islands, from where its first human colonists originated. Although possessing plentiful bird life, sea mammals and other marine taxa, people faced challenges adapting their tropical horticultural practices to this new land. This paper explores the changing fortunes of people and dogs during the settlement...


Next-generation sequencing unravels the relationship of Paleoeskimo and Thule dogs from the North American Arctic (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sarah Brown. Christyann Darwent. Ben Sacks.

The peopling of the North American Arctic, occurred in two waves. First the Paleoeskimo people migrated from Siberia roughly 4,000 BP, followed by the Thule people ca. 1000 BP. The Thule people are known for their innovation and rapid colonization of the North American Arctic, compared to small population sizes of the Paleoeskimo. A distinguishing characteristic of Thule culture relative to previous Arctic cultures was increased use of dogs, particularly for dogsled traction. Use of dogs by the...


An osteometric analysis of some aboriginal dogs (1948)
DOCUMENT Citation Only William George Haag.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Palaeolithic dogs in Europe and Siberia (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mietje Germonpré. Sergey Fedorov. Mikhail V. Sablin. Martina Láznicková-Galetová. Robert J. Losey.

Our group has demonstrated, on the basis of detailed morphometric analyses, the antiquity of the domestication of the wolf. The dog is the first domesticated animal and its origin can be traced to the Upper Palaeolithic. Two canid morphotypes can be distinguished in Pleistocene Eurasian sites dating from before and after the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM): a morphotype that is similar to extant wolves, described by us as Pleistocene wolves, and a morphotype distinct from wolves; relative to wolves,...


The Upper Paleolithic beginnings of the domestication of the dog (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Mietje Germonpré. Martina Láznicková-Galetová. Mikhail Sablin. Hervé Bocherens.

With this contribution, we would like to present our ideas concerning the first steps in the domestication process of the dog. Two main hypotheses on the origin of the dog have been proposed: 1)"Self-domestication" by wolves: Some wolves were following Paleolithic hunter-gatherers to scavenge on the remains of prey left by the prehistoric people at the human settlements. Generation after generation, these wandering wolves adapted themselves to the human dominated environment. 2)"Social...