Culture Contact (Other Keyword)

1-23 (23 Records)

400 Years of History and Cross-cultural Interactions in a Ritually Mounded Landscape of South Tanna, Vanuatu (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Flexner.

A mounded landscape in south Vanuatu provides archaeological evidence relating to chiefly performance, voyaging, and ritual transformation during a period of cross-cultural contacts spanning 400 years or more. The site of Kwaraka is located at the southern end of Tanna Island. The area has a view on clear days of the neighbouring islands Futuna and Aniwa, and there is ethnohistoric evidence of long-term patterns of interaction between Tannese people and the people of these nearby islands....


Americanization in Samoa (1929)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Mead.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


At the Edge: Jamaican Amerindians and the Colonial Encounter. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Angus Mol. Lesley-Gail Atkinson. Hayley Mickleburgh.

This paper presents a new study of archaeological sites, collections and historical documents to bring to light a poorly known chapter in the Caribbean colonial encounters: the interactions of Jamaican Amerindians with the Spanish, and later British and Maroons. The island of Jamaica held a special position in the Spanish colonial empire, due to its peripheral position in in the global shipping and trade networks that emerged in the early Spanish main and a lack of the precious metals that were...


Centers of power and ritual: discussing the archaeological remains from two large Zhangzhung-Period Settlements on the Tibetan Plateau (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Yongxian Li.

The two large settlement sites of Ka’erdong and Zebang which were radiocarbon-dated to 3000-1500 BP probably belong to the former Zhangzhung Kingdom (1500 BC – AD 645). These two sites are unusually large, covering an area of 130,000 m2 and 500,000 m2 respectively. Both sites have large cemeteries, residential areas, ritually-used spaces, and defensive structures. The largest structure observed is a large stone-mound tomb with a diameter of 60 m and a height of 6 m that can be attributed to a...


Changing Foodways in Culture Contact Contexts on the Northern Great Plains: Lipid Residue Analysis at the Double Ditch Site, North Dakota (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Whitney Goodwin. Kacy L. Hollenback. Fern Swenson. William C. Hockaday.

Disentangling drivers of technological change and continuity in culture contact situations is complex. In the northern Great Plains, earthlodge village groups are reported to have abandoned traditional ceramic containers for certain tasks by the early 19th century. The veracity of these observations is confounded by other contact situation processes, such as epidemics, which also impacted ceramic production and use. Ethnoarchaeology has documented the use of particular vessel types exclusively...


Conquistadores, Colonists, and Chiefdoms in Northern La Florida: Artifacts and Architecture at the Berry Site in Western North Carolina (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Rodning. Robin Beck. David Moore.

From 1566 to 1568, the northern frontier of the Spanish colonial province of La Florida was situated in western North Carolina. Members of the Hernando de Soto expedition traversed the province of "Xuala," in the upper Catawba Valley, in 1540, en route to towns on the other side of the Appalachians, in eastern Tennessee. Expeditions led by Juan Pardo between 1566 and 1568 visited many of the same places and provinces in the Carolinas and eastern Tennessee as the Soto expedition, including...


Cultural Continuity and Change in the Wake of Ancient Nubian-Egyptian Interaction (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jessika Akmenkalns.

This paper addresses the effects of long-term contact and colonialism among ancient Egyptian and Nubian communities during the Kerma period (ca. 2500-1500 BC) in northern Sudan. A wide array of theoretical perspectives on culture contact and colonialism has emerged in recent decades, highlighting the diverse range of outcomes that can result from extended periods of interaction and struggles for political control. Such crosscultural interactions may occur in the context of information exchange,...


Culture Contact and Subsistence Change at Fusihatchee (1EE191) (2001)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman.

Archaeological evidence from Colonial period Native American sites in southeastern North America document dramatic changes in many aspects of Native American life. In contrast, studies of zooarchaeological remains from the Colonial period indicate that subsistence systems changed very little in spite of the introduction of domestic animals. However, few zooarchaeological assemblages from sites with both precolonial and colonial occupations have been studied. The pre-Creek and Creek site of...


Description and Analysis of Early Pottery Types in the Lower Susquehanna River Valley of Pennsylvania (1978)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ira F. III Smith.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


The Early Contact Period (1989)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Borofosky. Alan Howard.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


East Coast Canines and Culture Contact: a multi-disciplinary approach (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kelsey Noack Myers.

On the eastern edge of North America, native canine populations were brought into contact with foreign human and canine populations in the 17th century. This paper utilizes multiple types of data to address the dynamics between human and canine groups in spheres of interaction evidenced by archaeological remains from multi-component sites on the northeastern and Mid-Atlantic coasts of the United States spanning the late pre-Columbian and contact periods.


Eighteenth-Century Choctaw Pottery from Fort Tombecbe (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Ashley Dumas.

The French established Fort Tombecbe in 1736, in part, to secure their relationship with the eastern Choctaw. Over the following twenty-seven years, thousands of Choctaws visited the fort to trade, and, by 1763, a large town was located nearby. Choctaw pottery recently excavated from French components at the fort adds to a regional and offers insights into the relationship between the Choctaw and French during the middle of the eighteenth century at a remote frontier fort. SAA 2015 abstracts...


Forging a New Frontier for the Old: The Great Lakes’ Fox Wars of New France (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Linda Naunapper.

History of the Great Lakes Fox Wars (AD 1680-1730) is embedded within broader historical narratives that are based upon early modern period primary source material. Archaeologists use the narratives to assign material culture meaning by matching archaeological assemblages to what is known about the historic past. Some decades-old unanswered (or seemingly unanswerable) questions posed by this highly complex temporal period, however, appear to be rooted in a selective use of historical...


Frontiers, Peripheries, and Borderlands: Agents of Identity Change and Formation in Southern California (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Courtney H. Buchanan.

The study of frontiers and borderlands in archaeology has evolved over the years from viewing them as rigid boundaries, to permeable peripheries, to active areas of contact and interaction. They are fascinating moments in time that represent the meetings of different peoples, societies, cultures, and beliefs. They are also regions where profound personal and social changes occurred, oftentimes directly because of their removed nature from a central authority. This paper will consider one...


Humanitarian Sites: A Contemporary Archaeological and Ethnographic Study of Clandestine Culture Contact among Undocumented Migrants, Humanitarian Aid Groups, and the U.S. Border Patrol (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Justine A. Drummond. Jason De León.

For over a decade, Arizona humanitarian groups such as Samaritans and No More Deaths have attempted to help undocumented migrants by leaving water bottles along the many trails in the Sonoran Desert leading from Mexico into the United States. These humanitarian sites have become a source of public controversy, viewed as acts of littering or attempts to aid illegal immigration. During the 2012 and 2013 field seasons of the Undocumented Migration Project, we conducted an archaeological analysis of...


Incorporation and Independence in the Preclassic Western Maya Lowlands: Integrating Local and Regional Traditions at Rancho Búfalo, Chiapas, Mexico (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeffrey Dobereiner.

In this paper, I explore tensions between territorial integration and local resilience at Rancho Búfalo, Chiapas, a five hectare Preclassic center that was geographically intermediate to the cultural territories of the Olmec, Lowland Maya, and Pacific Coast. This site's residents' employed a localized approach to extra-local architectural packages, ceramic spheres and burial traditions, that complicates traditional narratives of ethnic and political incorporation in Preclassic Southern...


Incorporation of new raw materials by hunter gatherers in Patagonia since the XVIth century. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amalia Nuevo Delaunay. Juan Bautista Belardi. Flavia Carballo Marina. Hernán de Angelis. Maria José Saletta.

Since the arrival of XVIth Century Europeans to Patagonia, different indigenous societies inhabiting the region were forced to deeply modify their ancient lifeways. The incorporation of new raw materials (for example glass and stoneware) in the production of traditional instruments (for example scrapers and projectile points) was one of several of modified aspects recorded both archaeologically and historically. At first glance, the use of new raw materials appears to have been equally...


Medicine dog; medicine baboon: images of horses perceived by contact cultures in rock art. (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Sam Challis.

Horses traveled when Europeans expanded across the globe and thereafter swiftly spread among indigenous groups on those continents colonized. The way they are portrayed in rock art can potentially tell us much about the nature of the entanglements of contact and the groups both bringing and adopting this hugely influential domestic animal. This paper draws on rock art evidence from South Africa, Australia, North and South America. Indigenous portrayals of the horse are sometimes conflated with...


On Culture Contact and Its Working in Modern Palestine (1947)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Raphael Patai.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Pavao-Zuckerman Fusihatchee Fauna
PROJECT Uploaded by: Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman

This project consists of zooarchaeological remains from the ancestral Muscogee-Creek site of Fusihatchee, identified at the University of Georgia. The data formed the basis of Barnet Pavao-Zuckerman's 2001 Dissertation. Site: The Ancestral Creek and Creek town of Fusihatchee (1EE191) is located on the Tallapoosa River in Alabama, and has both precolonial and colonial period occupations, allowing for diachronic analysis. These components include the Late Woodland (A.D. 1050-1250),...


Samoa: Pre-Missionary European Contact and the Influence of This Contact Upon the Samoans and Upon the Subsequent Establishment of the Missionaries (1964)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David W. Faust.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Strangers in a Strange Land: The Lake Koshkonong Oneota Locality in Context (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Jeske.

The distribution of Oneota sites in Wisconsin has long been recognized as clustered within distinct areas referred to as Localities. At least seven localities are now generally accepted by Oneota researchers in Wisconsin; several others appear to exist in northern Illinois. However, recent research at the Lake Koshkonong locality shows that it stands as a distinctive outlier among all of the other localities. It is unique in terms of landscape patterns, subsistence strategies, distance from...


Tehuelche (Aonikenk) site variability during XIXth to XXIst century in Southern Patagonia (Argentina and Chile) (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amalia Nuevo Delaunay. Juan Bautista Belardi. Flavia Carballo Marina.

Since the arrival of Europeans (XVIth Century) and their related economic activities in Patagonia, the different indigenous societies that inhabited the region were forced to deeply modify their ancient ways of life. The incorporation of new raw materials (glass and stoneware) to produce traditional instruments was one of several of modified aspects that have been archaeologically and historically (chronicles) recorded. We study and compare Tehuelche (Aonikenk) data from XIXth to XXIst century...