Frontiers, Peripheries, and Borderlands: Agents of Identity Change and Formation in Southern California

Author(s): Courtney H. Buchanan

Year: 2015

Summary

The study of frontiers and borderlands in archaeology has evolved over the years from viewing them as rigid boundaries, to permeable peripheries, to active areas of contact and interaction. They are fascinating moments in time that represent the meetings of different peoples, societies, cultures, and beliefs. They are also regions where profound personal and social changes occurred, oftentimes directly because of their removed nature from a central authority. This paper will consider one particular frontier region - Southern California - as it evolved from a Spanish, to Mexican, to American frontier area. It will incorporate new understandings of identity formation and fluidity in regions of  cultural contacts and interactions. It will also analyze the different types of frontiers and borderlands that the Native Americans and incoming European/American populations defined, dismantled, and negotiated to create the area we know today as Southern California.

Cite this Record

Frontiers, Peripheries, and Borderlands: Agents of Identity Change and Formation in Southern California. Courtney H. Buchanan. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 434079)

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 517