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Society for Historical Archaeology 2015

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology

Society for Historical Archaeology 2015


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Documents

  • The 1977 Excavations of French Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729): Adaptation on the Louisiane Frontier   (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428560] LisaMarie Malischke.

    Dr. Ian W. Brown excavated the site of French Fort St. Pierre, near Vicksburg, Mississippi, from 1974 to 1976. A 1977 season by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History was never fully reported. As part of a new dissertation project, an initial report as to the contents of this collection will be presented. The artifact assemblage suggests that the garrison and other inhabitants of Fort St. Pierre suffered from a lack of supplies that led them to adapt to frontier life by turning to...

  • 2 Cool 4 School: An Alaskan Archaeology HipHop Tale (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434091] MoHagani Magentek Adamu.

    What fun is historical archaeology when it seldom reaches outside academia and into the public spheres? This presentation is a tale about a HipHop Archaeologist in Alaska finding her way outside her boundaries of African American Archaeologies and Burial Ground Studies. Burnt out from academic studies and school, Ms. Mahogany Bones and Lady Plup set out on an unofficial archaeological investigation to the Old Knik Townsite Museum. They have no preconceptions or a premise for their research other...

  • 3-D Photo Modeling Applications in Underwater Archeology (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434080] Brett Seymour.

    Recent advances in 3-D modeling technologies have entered the field of Archeology. The Submerged Resources Center (SRC) of the National Park Service has begun using this technology in the field of Underwater Archeology. Using the Autodesk program ReCap and underwater digital photography SRC photographers have been able to create 3-D models of discreet features and more recently of whole sites. This paper will introduce the technology of 3-D point clouds and compare the final products of the 3-D...

  • The A7 Project - An investigation of HM Submarine A7 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433965] Peter Holt.

    January 2014 was the 100th anniversary of the loss of the Royal Navy submarine A7, sunk during a training exercise off Plymouth, England.  All contemporary salvage attempts failed and the submarine was abandoned on the seabed and forgotten, but the wreck was rediscovered by sports divers in 1981.  In 2001, problems with sports divers removing parts of the submarine prompted the UK Ministry of Defence to designate the site under the Protection of Military Remains Act and all diving was banned. In...

  • Abalone Shell, Broken Pots, Hearths, Windbreaks and Archival Research: Clues to Identifying 19th Century California Abalone Colection and Processing Sites on the Channel Islands (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428571] Judy Berryman.

    The Chinese abalone and fisheries in California developed in the late 1850s, flourished, and then delcined  in the early 1900s. The majority of California Chinese studies have focused on immigrant populations in established urban Chinatowns. Much less attention has been given to economic strategies and survival mechanisms associated with rural communities, specialized labor camps, or fishing camps. Many of these industries were first developed in the West by Chinese immigrants only to be taken...

  • Acadian Adaptations in North and South America (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433879] Steven R. Pendery.

    The tragedy of the deportation of the Acadians from their homeland by the British in the 1750s was compounded by their exploitation by the French government at the conclusion of the Seven Years War. French imperial policy focused on settling and developing portions of tropical colonies such as French Guiana with Acadians and Europeans in order to minimize slave labor.  Although more than 9,000 colonists perished upon their arrival in La Guyane, a few hundred Acadians survived in extended coastal...

  • Adding Lasers to the Archaeological Toolkit: The Costs and Benefits of Terrestrial LiDAR in Digital Archaeology (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434089] Patricia G Markert. Benjamin Skolnik. Stefan F. Woehlke.

    In recent years, companies such as FARO and CyArk have begun incorporating 3D laser scanners into field-ready packages.  Archaeologists have successfully employed these new 3D laser-scanning techniques to record sites such as Mount Rushmore and Merv in modern-day Turkmenistan.  Despite the potential benefits of using this technology, which produces quickly scanned, high-resolution images of topography and features, several limitations have slowed it from entering the archaeologist’s standard...

  • "Africa" in Connecticut (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433905] Sarah Croucher.

    In this paper I discuss how archaeological interpretations of nineteenth century free black communities can be strengthened when Africa as a discursive concept is included alongside our analyses of race. In the southern U.S. historical archaeologists have long been attuned to the tangible material presence of enslaved Africans and their descendants. I address the question of "Africa" in relation to nineteenth century free communities of color in Connecticut, arguing that the discursive nature of...

  • African Diaspora Archaeology "The Bocas Way" (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433746] Jerry Howard.

    This research is an investigation into the African Diaspora and an archaeological approach that is based on exploring the African Diaspora in a complex, multi-ethnic, multiracial situation, where I was able to draw on excavations, archival documents, and ethnography to infer the process of culture change and emergent identities. The research takes place within the western Caribbean island community of Bocas del Toro, Panama. In this presentation I will present my perspectives and approach to...

  • The African Diaspora in West Africa: The Atlantic Slave Trade and Colonial Eras on the Gambia River (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433899] Liza Gijanto.

    The Gambia River was an active site of the Atlantic slave trade and British efforts to legitimize trade in the 19th century.  African peoples were brought from the Gold Coast and Sierra Leone as part of different commercial and colonial ventures while others were sent to the Americas as enslaved. Geographically part of the African Diaspora as both a site of departure and settlement, this paper explores African populations resettled along the river as slaves and liberated Africans in the 18th and...

  • African Slave Spells and Root Work: Crossing the Boundary of Past to Present in Contemporary Cemeteries (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433981] Sharon K. Moses.

    Recurring evidence of "root work" or "hoodoo" and other African magic rituals have been found periodically in and around the graves of the recently dead in contemporary cemeteries located in the South. This paper is an exploration of the connection between the author’s excavation site, a slave street on a former rice plantation located in the South Carolina Low Country, and descendants that maintain conjuring traditions and practices. Slaves used "root work" and rituals for health curatives, to...

  • All The Single Ladies: Queering Race In The 19th Century Through The Materiality of African-American Female-Headed Households (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434170] Laurie A. Wilkie. Annelise E. Morris.

    Unspoken in discussions of heteronormativity is not only the assumption that couples are straight, but also that they are white and middle class. Thus, by definition. as non-heteronormative households, black families can be considered queer. In this paper, we explore the ways that queer theory offers new intellectual opportunities and frameworks to explore archaeologies of race and racialization. Using case studies from 19th century Louisiana and Illinois, we will examine the households and...

  • All the Small Things: An Analysis of Small Finds at James Madison’s Montpelier Plantation (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433786] Jeanne Higbee.

    Over the past two decades, archaeology at Montpelier has provided a critical perspective into the lives of the enslaved individuals who lived and worked on the plantation. Excavations of the Montpelier Field Quarter and the South Yard have yielded a unique opportunity to further our understanding of the cultural impact on the landscape. Small finds, such as sewing and smoking implements are examples of important domestic artifacts found at many of these excavations. The proposed research will...

  • All the Yards a Market: Bones of Dissent and the Seed of Reproduction (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433753] Justin E. Uehlein.

    Subsistence gardening and animal rearing were as integral to the expansion of U.S. capitalism as the coal that fueled its development. Labor performed at the home provided an effective means of workforce reproduction without significant capital investment by elites while also providing an outlet for laborer resistance to company control. In particular, these skills aided the working-class during labor strikes and periods of unemployment. Working-class communities were paradoxically situated...

  • All’s Well That Ends Well: The Re-Examination of Drayton Hall’s South Flanker Well (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433732] Sarah Stroud.

    Drayton Hall was established by John Drayton in 1738 to operate as the home seat at the center of his vast commercial plantation network in Charleston, SC. Upon obtaining ownership of Drayton Hall in 1974, the National Trust for Historic Preservation initiated archaeological excavations to expose evidence of the plantation’s eighteenth and nineteenth century activities and residents. The 1975 excavations uncovered a well just south of the South Flanker building. The wood-lined well was excavated...

  • Alone in the Deep Blue Sea: A comparison of Indonesian Colonial Period nutmeg plantations and New World plantations (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434109] Amy Jordan.

    Plantations on the nutmeg-bearing Banda Islands are contemporaneous with early North American plantations and are an excellent place to investigate cross-cultural responses to colonialism. The Banda Islands were the world’s sole source of nutmeg in the 16th century and control over this spice was a major goal for European powers during the Age of Expansion. Consequently, the Banda Islands were the location of early experiments in colonialism by European powers and can provide information for...

  • AMEC E&I Archaeological Investigation Results: DhRr-74 "Kikayt Village Site" (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434031] Sarah K Smith.

    Summary of results of archaeological investigations conducted by AMEC Environment & Infrastructre within the Kikayt village site (DhRr-74) located on the southern bank of the Fraser River in Surrey, British Coulumbia, Canada.  The Kikayt site is identified in the ethnigraphies of Hill-Tout as a Kwantlen First Nation fishing village, reportedly abandoned by 1858-1859 when the then capitol, New Westminster, was founded accross the river. The site was established as an Indian Reserve for the...

  • American Disruptive Archaeologies: The Theory and Practice of Punk (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434165] Andrew D. Reinhard.

    In my presentation, I will look at the five most common tenets of Punk Archaeology as an approach to Public Archaeology, citing contemporary examples of each within an American context: • Apply a do-it-yourself (DIY) aesthetic to archaeology projects, especially when funding, personnel, and other kinds of support are lacking. • Study marginalized archaeologies, and conduct the archaeology of cultures and places eschewed by the Academy. • Study the history and archaeology of Punk and Punk...

  • American Forts and Dakota Burial Mounds: Landscapes of Mourning and Dominion at the Boundaries of Colonialist Expansion (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433859] Sigrid Arnott. David Maki.

    For hundreds of years, the Dakota landscaped natural liminal zones (high promontories above water) with burial earthworks. These sacred landscapes signaled boundaries between spiritual realms, the living and the dead, and local village domains. During the 19th century, the U.S. Government took ownership of the Dakota homelands in Minnesota and the Dakota Territory leading to violent conflict and decades of war. At the boundary of this conflict forts were built to "sweep the region now occupied...

  • An Analysis of the Slave Village site at St. Nicholas Abbey (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433724] Camille L. Chambers. Frederick Smith.

    Established in the 1600s, St. Nicholas Abbey is a sugar plantation that has been preserved as a historical site in Barbados. In 2007, excavations led by Dr. Fredrick Smith revealed the location of a slave village. Excavations from the 2014 summer field season were conducted to establish the physical and temporal boundaries of the site. Artifacts from both the 2007 and 2014 excavations were cataloged into the Digital Archaeological Archive of Comparative Slavery (DAACS). The DAACS cataloging of...

  • Analyzing personal narratives across disciplines: examples from nineteenth century Minnesota (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434061] Kaila Akina.

    Documentary sources are an important complement to material culture in archaeological analysis. One form specifically--personal narratives--provides us with ample opportunities to explore aspects of past people's worlds as they saw and experienced them. What makes these printed and oral accounts fascinating to explore is what gets recorded, who recoded it, and why. I argue that archaeologists would benefit from investigating these sources as critically as other documents. This paper offers a...

  • Anarchy in the UK (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434166] Lorna J Richardson.

    This paper will view British public archaeology through the lens of the specifically British experience of politically energetic and aggressive militant working class sub-cultural phenomenon of punk rock, which asked questions about social issues such as unemployment, racism, sexism, identity and militarism, and the contradictions inherent within a Punk Public Archaeology approach in the UK. It will situate the DIY aesthetic of British Punk Public Archaeology as a cultural expression within a...

  • Another Place for Thinking: A Decade of Making Connections at Wye House (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434085] Mark P. Leone. Benjamin Skolnik.

    In a 2005 article in World Archaeology, Dan Hicks revisits the William Paca garden in Annapolis, calling it "a place for thinking", not only in the literal sense used by Leone but also in that scholars frequently revisit it as they work out disciplinary issues in the present.  As we think about "Peripheries and Boundaries", we cannot help but to think beyond them, to the connections that tie together the sites we excavate and to the people we find there both in the past and in the present.  In...

  • Apparel in Peril: An archaeological study of how clothing becomes embedded with human suffering (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433798] Anna Antoniou. Jason De León.

     The Undocumented Migration Project has recovered over 4,000 articles of clothing once worn by migrants crossing the Mexico­Arizona border. This often darkly colored apparel is intended to help people furtively move across the desert and avoid detection by Border Patrol. When recovered archaeologically, this clothing is often torn, faded, and stained with bodily fluids that reflect different forms of physical pain experienced en route. Here we employ the concept of "use­wear" (i.e. modifications...

  • Archaeological and Geophysical Investigations of the Tebbs Bend Battlefield, Taylor County, Kentucky (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433768] W. Stephen McBride. Philip B. Mink. Edward R. Henry.

    In 2011 McBride Preservation Services and the Kentucky Archaeological Survey conducted geophysical surveys and archaeological excavations of the Tebbs Bend Civil War Battlefield for the Tebbs Bend-Green River Bridge Battlefield Association and the American Battlefield Protection Program.  This investigation consisted of archival research, military terrain analysis, geophysical surveys, and archaeological survey and testing and resulted in the discovery and exposure of sections of the forward...

  • Archaeological investigations at Brouage (France) : the "Maison Champlain" site (16th-17th centuries) (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428582] Alain Champagne.

    Established in the mid-16th century, the French Atlantic port city of Brouage is surrounded by salt marshes, which produced a valuable commodity that was exported to northern Europe and formed the basis for the city’s early wealth. However a number of factors contributed to the city’s almost immediate decline, so that by the end of the 19th century Brouage was nothing more than a small village of less than one hundred inhabitants. The principal contributing factors were the gradual silting up of...

  • Archaeological Investigations at the Historic Locations of Sulphur Springs, Oklahoma: A GIS-based Investigation of Cultural Rescources Within Chickasaw National Recreation Area (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434127] Jeremy Brunette.

    Sulphur Springs, located in south-central Oklahoma on what is now Chickasaw National Recreation area presents a complex tale of frontier politics. Located around a series of mineral and fresh-water springs, Sulphur Springs was an attempt by European Americans to create a health resort on land owned by the Chickasaw Nation. National politics, including the Dawes Act, and issues involving water quality led to the purchase of the town’s improvements in 1902, and again in 1904. This purchase became...

  • Archaeological Investigations of Camp Frazer, Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433767] Brian Mabelitini.

    Camp Frazer was established by the Union Army in Cynthiana, Kentucky in September 1861. Built on the farm of Dr. Joel C. Frazer, this post typically garrisoned 900 soldiers. Archival research indicates that a brick structure on the Frazer farm was used by the army as a hospital before being burned by Confederate troops on July 17, 1862. Archaeological investigations located this structure along with numerous military items in situ within the destruction debris. This research sheds light on the...

  • Archaeological Perspectives on Atlantic World Historic Preservation (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434113] R. Grant Gilmore III.

    Cultural, social, economic and geographic issues facing historic preservation practitioners across theAtlantic World will be explored in this talk. Special emphasis will be placed on those working in the Caribbean, Central/South America, West Africa and Europe where boundaries are sometimes irrelevant and being on the periphery is significant.  Local/indigenous experiences and observations regarding valuing the historic past will be critically addressed.  Participants will also gain insights...

  • Archaeological Survey of Tennessee's Rosenwald Schools (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433976] Benjamin C. Nance. Samuel D. Smith.

    In 1911 Booker T. Washington, President of the Tuskegee Institute, met with Julius Rosenwald, President of Sears, Roebuck, and Company, to discuss building schools for African-American children in the American South.  From 1912 to 1932 the Rosenwald program helped fund more than 5,300 schools, shops, and teachers’ homes.  The Tennessee Division of Archaeology is currently conducting a survey to locate and record the sites of Tennessee’s 354 schools, 10 shops, and 9 teachers’ homes.  The project...

  • Archaeology and Preservation at the Lake George Battlefield (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433961] David R. Starbuck.

    The Lake George Battlefield Park is located at the southern end of Lake George, New York, where it was the setting for the Battle of Lake George between the British and the French in 1755; for an entrenched camp of British reinforcements for Fort William Henry at the time of the massacre in 1757; for Gen. James Abercromby's army in 1758 and Gen. Jeffery Amherst's army in 1759; and then for additional British and American occupations during the American Revolution.  The Park thus contains the...

  • Archaeology and the Battle of the Atlantic: Approaches, Methods and Results of Studying and Underwater Battlefield (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433771] Joseph C Hoyt.

    Seven years of focused research has been directed towards studying and characterizing WWII losses off the coast of North Carolina. During this time, NOAA has worked with multiple state, federal, academic and private sector partners to increase our understanding of this large collection of resources. This project evolved over time in both theoretical approaches as well as methodologies employed to collect data. Over the course of seven years an incredible amount of information has been uncovered:...

  • Archaeology and the Changing Landscape of Community in a Colonial Capital; The Banjul Heritage Project (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433902] Sarah Platt. Liza Gijanto.

    Banjul was founded in 1816 as part of the British efforts to block the slave trade on the Gambia River.  A planned urban center, the city developed around a series of neighborhoods designated as colonial, merchant, and African laborer spaces.  Amongst the most prominent settlers were the Aku from Sierra Leone and French traders from Goree who were instrumental in the growth of the colonial economy.  In preparation for the 200th anniversary of the city in 2016, the Banjul Heritage Project seeks...

  • The Archaeology of Art in Berlin (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433740] Carolyn White.

    The city of Berlin, Germany is known for its art and for its community of practicing artists, amidst a city described as a living ruin. This paper focuses on the physicality, ephemerality, and durability of the art community and its engagement with the built environment. The physical spaces in Berlin and the artists that occupy those spaces are the focus, particularly in the ways that artists use and reuse of the physical environment of the post-Wall city and the surrounding environs in...

  • The Archaeology of Borderlands: North Western Anatolia in the Early Ottoman Period (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433970] Fahri Dikkaya.

    Anatolia in the Early Ottoman Period and its socio-political transformations and interactions represented the temporal and spatial rhythms of inseparable structures between new comers and locals. As populations moved and interacted locally and regionally in the Western Anatolian borderlands, these rhythms through their crossing and exchanges set the stage for a network of interconnections among regional groups. This network functioned in a dynamic history of political consolidation of Turkmens...

  • Archaeology of Chinese Woodchoppers and the Forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin: Exploring the Intersections of Extractive Industries, Transportation, and Labor (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433722] Kelly Dixon. Carrie E. Smith.

    During the late 1860s and early 1870s, Chinese "woodchoppers" lived and worked in the vast forests of the South Lake Tahoe Basin in the eastern Sierra Nevada, near Genoa, Nevada, leaving distinctive archaeological signatures wherever they worked and lived. The laborers in these isolated camps supplied Nevada’s Comstock mines with forest products, as the Comstock had already depleted its own local sources of lumber, approximately 30 miles away. This relatively well-preserved local cultural...

  • The Archaeology of Class, Status and Authority Within Mid-19th Century U. S. Army Commissioned Officers: Examples from Fort Yamhill and Fort Hoskins, Oregon 1856-1866 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433865] Justin E Eichelberger.

    In 1856 Fort Yamhill and Fort Hoskins were established to guard the newly established Oregon Coast Reservation.  Charged with controlling traffic in and out of the northern part of the reservation these posts served as "post-graduate schools" for several officers who would later become high ranking generals during the American Civil War.  During their service these men, often affluent and well educated, held the highest social, economic and military ranks at these frontier military posts.  This...

  • The Archaeology of God’s Wrath – A Major Earthquake on the East Coast in 1663 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433928] Melanie Rousseau.

    On the evening of February 5th, 1663, an earthquake estimated to between 7.2 and 7.8 on the Richter scale begins. It is felt from the actual state of New York up to Quebec City and from Montreal to Tadoussac. For Christians this first quake represents the eve of Judgement Day. The earth continues to quake for seven months. The quake is interpreted as God’s Wrath following years of alcohol trade and consumption as well as generally poor behaviour in the colony such as a recurring failure to...

  • Archaeology of Shifting Landscapes on the Historic San Francisco Waterfront (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434072] Kale M. Bruner. Allen G. Pastron.

    Geographically situated at the northern margins of the Spanish empire and the among outposts of multinational commercial activities, the San Francisco Bay served as a hub of maritime traffic on the western coast of North America in the early nineteenth century. Evidence for use of the San Francisco waterfront in its natural state is preserved more than twelve feet below the modern city surface at Thompson’s Cove (CA-SFR-186H).  Stratified deposits document the sequence of physical alterations...

  • Archaeology Of The William Berkley Sutler Store, Camp Nelson Civil War Depot, Jessamine County, Kentucky (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433765] Kim A. McBride. W. Stephen McBride. Kathie Danner. Denise Waggoner. Todd Osborne.

    Archaeological excavations at the William Berkley sutler store at the Camp Nelson Civil War Depot, in Jessamine County, Kentucky, have been directed at understanding the architectural construction and layout of the store building, products that were sold at the store, and activities that took place there.  Nails, window glass, and architectural features suggest that this building was a frame or board and batten building set on wooden piers. A large assemblage of bottle glass and tin cans...

  • The Archaeology of Yiddish Folklore: Towards an Understanding of Jewish Folk Practice in the 19th Century (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433827] David M Markus.

    Jews, as a cultural and religious group, have been largely underrepresented in archaeological studies of diaspora populations. Recently there has been a paradigm shift in diaspora archaeology toward understanding these populations from both the perspective of their originating geography as well as their diasporic home. The archaeology of Jewry in North America has largely centered on a period, from 1820-1880, that largely saw migrations from Eastern European populations. These people, known...

  • Archaeology, Shadowed Pasts, and the Making of Heritage (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433742] Bonnie J. Clark.

    As Laurajane Smith contents, heritage is not a series of sites, but of practices. Practioners of contemporary archaeology are lodged firmly in that practice, participating through the data we uncover, the stakeholders we engage, and even the media attention we draw to particular historic events but not others.  The archaeology of Amache, the site of a World War II-era Japanese American internment camp, is a long-term, community-based project focused on a past that has often been muted in...

  • An Archeology of Labor in Practice (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433749] Paul Shackel.

    Labor studies in the twenty first century are at a crucial turning point. As labor has steadily lost influence in the United States, labor organizations have been increasingly memorializing crucial moments in labor history. These moments are often clashes between labor and capital in which any victory, and sometimes losses, were hard fought. The new National Historic Landmark study of labor archaeology provides guidelines to help us identify significant sites and provide a new way to contribute...

  • Arks, Broadhorns, and Hoop-Pole Boats: The America Flatboat Wreck in Southern Illinois (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433832] Mark Wagner.

    Shoe-box shaped "flatboats" represented the most common vessel type on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers from 1770-1900. Although  tens of thousands of these boats were built during this period, by 1915 a historian lamented that "not one of them remains" . In 2002, however, SIU archaeologists documented the remains of  an early 1800s  flatboat wreck found resting on the Illinois shoreline near the abandoned town of "America". Subsequent documentation of the 45 ft long x 12 ft wide wreck provided...

  • "Arming the Roanoke Colony": Illustrating Bellicosity through Archival and Archaeological Findings (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434161] Erwin Walker Lane. Brent Lane.

    Sir Walter Ralegh’s attempted English colony in coastal North Carolina is best known for thefailure of its 1587 "Lost Colony". But that colony was preceded by a 1585-86 exploratorysettlement that accomplished much of its mission to explore and describe the region’s lands, flora, fauna and peoples. Officially peaceful, this "First Colony" nonetheless engaged in military actions with indigenous peoples. Although direct archaeological evidence of its military capability is scant, a...

  • Artefacts of transformation: the material culture of Black Loyalists in late eighteenth century Atlantic Canada. (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428580] Philippa Puzey-Broomhead.

    In 1784, approximately 3,000 Black people who had joined the British during the American Revolutionary War were evacuated from New York to Nova Scotia, alongside several thousand other Loyalist refugees. This poster explores the transformative powers of three items of material culture in the creation and maintenance of a Black Loyalist identity in what is now Atlantic Canada: the book in which their names were recorded prior to their evacuation from New York; the uniform coat worn by one of the...

  • The Artifact Collection from Modern Greece: Using 50 Years of Conservation to Answer New Questions (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433909] Chelsea R. Freeland.

    This paper analyzes the salvage of artifacts from Modern Greece, a Civil War blockade-runner off Wilmington, NC. The NC Underwater Archaeology Branch brought up over 10,000 artifacts in 1962-63. Parts of the collection underwent conservation, while others remained in storage at Fort Fisher. Recently, students from ECU completed a re-housing project to allow for identification of conservation targets and prevent degradation. This paper discusses the retrieval and housing as related to the...

  • Artistic Endeavors in Nebraska’s Prisoner of War Camps (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433847] Allison Young. Allison M Young.

    During the Second World War, thousands of prisoners of war were transported to the United States to be held for the duration of the conflict. The Geneva Convention served as the primary doctrine influencing how camps were built and how the prisoner populations were treated. Under the convention, prisoners were able to work for a wage as well as pursue hobbies in areas like education, sports, and the arts. This paper explores how the artistic pursuits of German POWs influenced the material record...

  • Assessing the Value and Potential of Labor Archaeology: A Description of the Labor Archaeology of the Industrial Era National Historic Landmark Theme Study (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433756] Adam Fracchia.

    Work and labor relations have been under attack over the last several decades.  Many of the same issues and problems confronting workers today were faced by workers in the past.  Historical archaeology has the ability to use archaeology to highlight these connections and thus, contribute to the study of labor and the current labor dialogue and struggles.  This paper details the latest draft of the Labor Archaeology of the Industrial Era National Historic Landmark Theme Study and its usefulness...

  • At the Crossroads of Consumption: 19th Century Slave Life in Western Tennessee (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434040] Kimberly Kasper. Katharine Reinhart. Ellie Maclin.

    In eight years of excavations on the 20,000 acre Ames land base in western Tennessee, a clearer picture of the 19th century of everyday life and the associated patterns of consumption of the antebellum south has emerged. With over twenty contiguous plantations, we are able to compare specific characteristics of the material culture from large (3,000+ acres) to small plantations (300 acres). Our current focus is on Fanny Dickins, a woman of financial means who established a small plantation after...

  • Atlantic Traverses, Contrastive Illuminations (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433869] Christopher Fennell.

    Research projects in historical archaeology have been greatly enhanced by trans-Atlantic, comparative perspectives and questions probing the contours of European colonial impacts. Marley Brown's work has provided a key intellectual impetus to these developments. His focus has compelled colleagues to exhaust interdisciplinary data sets in each research project, and to frame questions with a large-scale, comparative perspective. A remarkable variety of research questions are being addressed, often...

  • The Australian Historic Shipwreck Preservation Project: in-situ preservation techniques for wooden shipwrecks (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433821] Cassandra M Philippou. Vicki Richards. Peter Veth. Jennifer Rodrigues. Debra Shefi.

    The Australian Historic Shipwreck Preservation Project (AHSPP) is a three-year national project funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant. Researchers and cultural heritage managers from ten Australian state, territory and federal partners and three universities have collaborated to investigate the long-term efficacy of reburial and stabilisation of heavily impacted submerged timber sites. The AHSPP has focussed on two significant wooden shipwrecks: the colonial trader Clarence...

  • Balancing Acts: Public Access and Archaeology in the Cape Fear Civil War Shipwreck District (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433933] Jeneva Wright.

    During the American Civil War, Wilmington, North Carolina served as an important blockade-running center for the Confederacy. The Cape Fear region’s high traffic and dangerous shoals resulted in the largest concentration of Civil War shipwrecks in the world. The interpretation of these wrecks for public outreach constitutes a valuable opportunity to educate members of the public using a material culture assemblage connected with the historical framework of the Wilmington blockade. This paper...

  • Barriers to Access, or the Ways Racism Continues (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433984] Teresa Moyer.

    Black history at historic plantations concerns more than slavery and freedom; it also tells the story of why blacks in the past are omitted at places with so much of their history to tell. Historic plantations offer rich laboratories in which to examine the ways that racism changes and stays the same through the circumstances that enable black history to be revealed or hidden.  By studying the interpretation--or lack thereof--of black history at places like Mount Clare, we can learn from the...

  • Battle of the Gulf: Archaeological Investigations in the other American Theater of World War II U-boat Operations (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433775] Douglas Jones.

    Following the early success of Operation Drumbeat off the American East Coast, German Naval Vice Admiral Karl Dönitz turned his periscopes towards similarly wide-open hunting grounds in the Gulf of Mexico. For a brief but intense period beginning in the spring of 1942 U-boat attacks claimed over 50 Allied Merchant Marine casualties in the Gulf, and crippled many more.  Over the last decade many of these wrecks have been located during federally-regulated oil and gas surveys, and subsequently...

  • The Bay of Storms and Tavern of the Seas: Risk and the Maritime Cultural Landscape of the Harbour at Cape Town (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434197] Jeremy Borrelli.

    South Africa’s connection with the sea is most prevalent in its founding harbor, Cape Town. Until the opening of the Suez Canal, the passage by the Cape of Good Hope represented the most important oceanic route to the East. The passage, however, quickly became known for unpredictable storms that devastated shipping in locations such as Table Bay. This paper examines the way the nineteenth century British government managed the risks associated with using Table Bay as a harbor of refuge and how...

  • Bead trade in the latter Atlantic world: A case study of 19th century sites in The Gambia, West Africa (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433900] Elizabeth A. McCague. Liza Gijanto.

    The Gambia River was a frontline of Atlantic trade among European merchants in the Atlantic world, particularly in regards to the exchange of glass beads established to promote commercial interactions with the local population. Though the 19th century marks the decline of the era on the Gambia River, the trends seen in the bead trade highlight the lasting implications of colonial involvements. This paper will address bead assemblages from Juffure, Berefet, and the colonial capital of Banjul...

  • The Beauty of Artifacts: A Study of Gendered Artifacts on a Student Led Campus Excavation (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434069] Dana Isabell Grutesen. Sarah E. Meister.

    Founded in 1827, Lindenwood University was one of the few all-girl colleges of its time and was located on the American Frontier in St. Charles, Missouri. A student-led project on campus is currently analyzing artifacts from an excavation of what is believed to be a trash dump containing items from students and faculty dating back to the mid-19th century. Gendered artifacts, such as cold cream jars, are heavily represented and are a focal point of the project. Using these and other artifacts,...

  • Being A 'Good' Girl: Crafting Gender in Indian Residential Schools (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434103] Sandie Dielissen.

    As part of the project of colonialism in North America, churches and missionaries introduced their standards of childhood through the education of Aboriginal peoples. Indian residential schools determined what it meant for Aboriginal girls to become proper women. Western ideals of femininity, modelled behaviour, appearance and clothing, personal possessions, and household goods informed respectability, and Aboriginal girls were taught a Christian home life geared towards removing them from their...

  • Being Intendant in New France, a Step Forward in a Cursus Honorum? (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433925] Olivier Roy.

    To rise through the ranks of "Ancient Régime" society, noblemen were called upon to fill various positions in the colonial administration. Being Intendant in New France might have been challenging and full of issues, but it was also a fast way to better your position. Among the challenges facing the Intendants, one of them was to reflect his wealth and social status necessary for the duty. Since the objective of my master’s thesis is to understand the symbolic importance of material culture as...

  • Bermuda in Microcosm: The Smiths Island Archaeology Project, 1610-2014 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433878] Michael J. Jarvis.

    Building on MRB3's dedication to comparative colonial archaeology, the SIAP incorporates 22 terrestrial sites and adjoining waters to investigate Bermuda's changing history and Atlantic integration across four centuries . Fieldwork since 2010 has uncovered Bermuda's earliest home (timber-frame, c. 1615 to c. 1714), a maritime quarantine building, a cave site, an 18th c. doctor's home, a c. 1759 whale processing complex, several quarries, limekilns, and docks, a small enslaved/free black...

  • The Best Kept Secrets in Archaeology: The numbers no one knows, but everyone talks about. (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434077] Doug Rocks-Macqueen.

    How many professional archaeologists are there? How much do they make? How many women are archaeologists? Where do they work? It has been 20 years since the data to answer these questions was gathered through a survey and published in the report The American Archaeologist: A Profile by Melinda A. Zeder. However, there has yet to be a follow up project. Our only profile of professional archaeologists is arguably out of date, signficantly. This paper uses a variety of different data sources to...

  • Best Practices for Managing UCH on the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433820] Dave Ball.

    Located along the western boundary of the continental United States, the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf holds a vast array of potential archaeological and historic resources, resources which must be considered during the federal permitting process for offshore renewable energy.  In order to better manage these resources and take into account potential adverse effects that could occur as a result of offshore renewable energy development, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management is undertaking a...

  • Between Desert and Oasis: Historic Irrigation Systems in the Western United States (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434096] Christopher Hetzel. Melissa Cascella.

    On the boundary between archaeology and architecture, irrigation systems and their unique features are often expansive and exhibit subtle nuances, presenting challenges to cultural resources professionals on how to best record and evaluate these distinctive resources. Using experience gleaned from large projects in California and Oregon, topics to be discussed include methodologies, lessons learned, and insights into potential recordation efficiencies. Also, the historical significance behind...

  • Between Dirt and Digital: Finding New Ways to Record Old Stuff! (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434155] Shane Sparks. Melissa Cascella.

    In this day and age, technology is advancing by leaps and bounds on a daily basis. In some cases, these advances can be incorporated into common or repetitive archaeological methods to improve efficiency, accuracy, and, in some cases, sanity. This poster will present the explorations of two archaeologists, who also have GIS experience, into several new technological advances that have the potential to be used in archaeological contexts. Explorations will include a look at hand-held devices...

  • "Beware of All Houses Not Recommended": Sensory Experience and Commercial Success of a Nineteenth-Century Boston Brothel (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434009] Jade W Luiz.

    Places of organized prostitution in the nineteenth-century operated within a very particular sensory framework. In many ways male patrons were paying for ambiance and sensory experience as well as sex. Through analysis of the material remains of brothel sites, such as items related to dining, lighting, or even personal hygiene, archaeology can potentially recreate the experienced context of these spaces. Sites, such as the brothel at 27/29 Endicott Street in Boston’s North End, have the...

  • "A Bewildering Variety" : A Material Culture Approach to Pearlware Hollow Forms (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433727] Esther White. Barbara Heath. Eleanor Breen.

    DAACS facilitates ceramic analysis at the sherd level with highly developed, exacting protocols for cataloguing attributes such as stylistic elements. This paper seeks to increase the level of systematic rigor applied to the vessel form field.  The authors argue that only through a material culture approach – one that employs multiple available lines of evidence including museum collections, archaeological data, and documentary sources – can vessel form data be made more reliable and replicable...

  • Beyond the Waters’ Edge: Complexity and Conservation Management of Underwater Cultural Heritage by Public Agencies in North Carolina. (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433980] Sarah Watkins-Kenney.

    Since the 1980s, heritage conservation has expanded in scope and complexity beyond just concern with technical preservation of tangible remains to also preserve intangible aspects. More than one conservation strategy may be possible but could have very different consequences for use of remains in the present and future. In many countries, those responsible for deciding which strategy to take are managers employed in public agencies. Understanding the nature of the system in which management...

  • Blue and White Chinese porcelain with datable 16th-century mounts (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433919] Linda Pomper.

    Besides learning from sherds that have been turned up by terrestrial and underwater archaologists, we can learn more about dating Chinese porcelain from pieces found with datable mounts in European collections.  Five pieces of blue and white porcelain now in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York were originally in Burghley House, Stamford, Lincolnshire, where they may have come via trade with Turkey.  They are significant because there were very few pieces of Chinese...

  • Blurred Boundaries: Internal and Illicit Plantation Economies (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433851] Kevin Fogle.

    Craft production, hired time, personal cotton plots, theft, and diverse trade networks created a patchwork of economic opportunities for several hundred slaves on Witherspoon Island, a 19th century cotton plantation in the Pee Dee region of South Carolina. This paper explores the impact of household and community involvement in a myriad of economic practices that were at times sanctioned, expressly forbidden, or tacitly accepted by the plantation management. When the archaeological and...

  • Blurred Lines: Queering the divide between pre-historic and historic archaeology (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434172] Kirsten Vacca.

    The infamous divide between historic and pre-historic archaeology in the North American tradition often rests on the introduction of written texts or the arrival of Europeans to a region. With the division comes methodology that is considered acceptable by each group. Well-renowned archaeologists have discussed this divide in detail, yet we continue to maintain the boundaries due to lack of implementation of new theoretical/methodological paradigms. This paper discusses the queering of...

  • The Boom and Bust of Tungsten Mining: A View from the Johnson Lake Mine (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434013] Karla J. Jageman.

    The Johnson Lake Mine was an early twentieth century tungsten mine. It is located above 10,000 feet on the eastern slope of the South Snake Range in east-central Nevada in what is now Great Basin National Park. The mine was in operation from 1908 – 1950. It was owned and operated by Alfred "Timberline" Johnson, Thomas Dearden, Sr. and Joseph Dearden. This presentation will discuss the recorded historic features and artifacts with a brief synopsis of the capitalism of tungsten mining as it...

  • Boundaries In Greensboro's 19th-Century Landscape: Households, Estate Lots, And Urbanization (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434003] Linda Stine. Teddi Burnett.

    During the early decades of the 1840s several of Guilford County's wealthier citizens constructed artfully designed estates within a short walk or ride of burgeoning downtown Greensboro.  The finest example of an urban estate with picturesque landscape is the Italianate Blandwood Mansion, designed by A. J. Davis for Governor J. M. Morehead.  Blandwood, The Elms and other large estates circling the one square mile core of Greensboro held numerous outbuildings, including housing for enslaved...

  • Breaking Boundaries on the Periphery: The Demise of Fort St. Pierre, 1719-1729, Vicksburg, Mississippi. (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433935] LisaMarie Malischke.

    Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729), in present-day Mississippi, was a short-lived fort on the periphery of colonial Louisiane. In December of 1729 its physical boundaries, the dry moat and palisade, were breached and burned as the fort and its soldiers were attacked by Yazoo and Koroa warriors. Using statistical and documentary evidence, along with newly analyzed information from the 1977 excavations, this presentation will discuss first the slow-decline and then immediate demise of the fort. It will...

  • Bridging the Boundary Between Archeological Site Protection and Natural Resources Invasive Species Management in the National Park Service: A Case Study of Robinia pseudoacacia Management at Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434043] Ashley Barnett. Keri Deneau.

    Archeologists have identified many historic archeological sites by the presence of cultural vegetation. When Euro-Americans claimed homesteads, they often planted exotic vegetation species on their properties, either for beautification of their land or for utilitarian purposes. In the National Park Service (NPS), natural resource programs now consider many of these non-native species to be invasive and have instituted management plans to stop the uncontrolled spread of these plants. The fact...

  • Bringing It All Back Home: The Archaeology of Diasporic Homelands (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433825] Stephen A. Brighton.

    In the context of modern history, diaspora is traditionally defined as a reluctant scattering of a large number of people to two or more international locations.  Most studies in the social sciences and humanities have concentrated efforts towards understanding how new experiences and contacts have shaped diasporic groups once away from their homelands. In essence, most studies are structured by the culture continuity/cultural change dynamic in new places of settlement. The established focus of...

  • Bringing the Neighborhood Back to Life: Working-Class Consumption and Immigrant Identity in 19th-Century Roxbury, Massachusetts (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433908] Janice A. Nosal.

    Working with the past always presents a bevy of challenges for researchers, and when material collections fall into disuse, it can be especially difficult to appreciate their intrinsic value.  Incorporating new technological methods (GIS) and primary document research allows archaeologists to synthesize original excavation and background information in innovative ways.  The Southwest Corridor Project (Roxbury, Boston, MA), excavated in the 1970s, is a perfect collection for these purposes. ...

  • British Colonial Bateaux in North America (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434186] Nathan A. Gallagher.

    Bateaux were a key utility craft in military operations in the colonies of North America. Their size, durability, and ease of construction made them ideal for moving troops and supplies over the lakes and rivers of New England and New France. The purpose of this presentation is to provide a construction analysis of the remains of some British colonial bateaux recovered from Lake George and place them in their historical context. The craft were built from a very simple design, and were hastily...

  • British Colonial Trade Goods in the Nevada Frontier (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428578] Ian Springer. Steven Holm.

    In the mid 19th century, Virginia City, Nevada attracted people from all over world by producing a steady stream of silver and gold that lined pockets and coffers around the world. During the summer of 2010, excavations were performed along South Howard Street, Virginia City by the University of Nevada, Reno in an effort to uncover evidence of community identity. Many artifacts were recovered, including a container seal bearing a George Whybrow Company logo, along with the name of its export...

  • Building Diaspora: Surviving and Thriving in the Shadow of Imperialism (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433822] Kelly Fong.

    In the aftermath of mid-19th century Western imperialist and capitalist expansion in China, the Chinese Diaspora grew beyond Southeast Asia as migrants left southern China for Australia, North America, and South America.  Despite being separated by the Pacific Ocean, these Chinese communities in the United States did not live in isolation.  Instead, they remained highly connected to their home villages and districts in southern China as well as communities throughout the Diaspora through the...

  • Built on Sand and Sanguine Expectations: Reconstructing the Layout of a Ghost Town, Signal, Arizona Territory (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434049] Bruce O. Schneider.

    In 1877 and 1878, Signal, Arizona boomed as the site of stamp mills along the Big Sandy River, processing silver ore from the nearby McCrackin Lode. While many proclaimed the McCrackin Lode would be Arizona’s Comstock, the boom quickly turned to bust. Signal was a remnant of its previous self during the 1880s, with its mills operating sporadically, and had truly become a ghost town by the 1890s. A challenge to understanding a settlement like Signal, and many ghost towns like it, is the complete...

  • Camp Lawton:  Life and Death of a Civil War Prison (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428574] Sue Moore. J. Kevin Chapman. Amanda L. Morrow.

    In 2010 Georgia Southern University began a long term project to investigate and interpret Camp Lawton Prison near Millen, Georgia.  This prison had a short lifespan, only six weeks to construct and six weeks of occupation and yet it has proven to have one of the most intact prisoner occupation areas of any Civil War prison in the United States.  Results of work so far have demonstrated the efficacy of metal detection use in the prisoner occupation area, developed a conservation strategy for...

  • Can Artificial Reef Wrecks Reduce Diver Impacts on Historic Shipwrecks? A Case Study from Australia (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433815] Joanne L Edney. Dirk HR Spennemann.

    Wreck diving is an increasingly popular activity, and has seen increasing numbers of divers visiting historic shipwreck sites. In some cases this has led to adverse impacts on these sites. A range of management strategies are used to manage diver impacts, ranging from exclusion to limiting the number of divers. Another strategy that deserves closer evaluation the use of artificial reef wrecks. Artificial reefs wrecks are popular attractions, and the number of vessels being sunk as dive sites has...

  • A Canoe on a Sand Bar: The Remarkable Story of the Guth Canoe in Northeast Arkansas (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433830] Jeffrey Mitchem.

    For thousands of years before motorized transportation, dugout canoes were the mode of water travel in interior North America. Due to their perishable nature, they are rarely found archaeologically. Most have been preserved due to being kept submerged in anaerobic conditions or buried in underwater sediments. In Arkansas, only a handful have been found, all in riverine situations. The severe flooding in northeast Arkansas in 2008 dislodged a dugout in the St. Francis River that ended up on a...

  • The Cape Point Maritime Cultural Landscape: Lighthouses, Shipwrecks, Baboons and Heritage Tourism in South Africa (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434199] B. Lynn Harris.

    Since 2004, the Cape Point Nature Reserve has been part of the Cape Floral Kingdom, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The spectacular reserve has an abundance of wildlife, historic shipwrecks and a lighthouse. A shipwreck hiking trail is a popular feature. Heritage visitation combined with nature tourism is a key component in South African economic growth today.  The Cape Point area is a good example of showcasing a global maritime cultural landscape in a broader context and this study explores the...

  • Capturing the Stronghold on Glass: Using 19th Century Stereographic Photographs for Enhanced Battlefield Survey at Lava Beds National Monument. (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433959] Eric B. Gleason.

    In April 1873 Eadweard Muybridge and Louis Heller came to the Lava Beds in northern California to photograph the sites, scenes, and participants of the Modoc War. They produced more than 75 stereo photographs, providing an unparalleled record documenting fortifications, weapons, U.S. Army field camps, and Modoc cave and camp locations. Many of these photographs detail Captain Jack’s Stronghold, the site of both Modoc and U.S. Army camps, and two major battles. These photographs proved to be...

  • "Caring for Their Prisoner Compatriots": Health and Dental Hygiene at the Kooskia Internment Camp (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433842] Kristen M Tiede. Kaitlyn Hosken.

    The Kooskia Internment Camp (KIC) near Lowell, Idaho, housed Japanese internees during World War II. Open from 1943 to 1945, Kooskia was home to 256 Japanese men who helped to build U.S. Highway 12 during their stay. As detainees of the U.S. Department of Justice, these individuals were treated as foreign prisoners of war and were therefore subject to the conditions of the 1929 Geneva Convention. As such, the internees possessed the right to adequate medical care.  Artifacts recovered from the...

  • Carissimo Salvatore: An Archaeological view of Italian Service Units at the Presidio of San Francisco (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433846] Kari Jones.

    Over 50,000 Italian prisoners of war were transported to the United States during World War II. After Italy negotiated an armistice with the Allies, POWs were presented with a choice. Those that signed an oath of allegiance to the new Italian government were assigned to Italian Service Units (ISUs). They provided support services for the United States military in exchange for limited freedoms and better living conditions. Those that refused to sign the oath remained in POW camps. This paper...

  • ‘Carmelo’s Cabinet’: The Material Culture of Collections in the Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434132] Judith P Joklik. Michael P Roller.

    Personal collections of objects reflect individual orderings of the material world, particularly when they encompass the realms of work, domestic life, health, aesthetics and religion. As complete sets, they are like an idealized version of an archaeological assemblage: intact, curated, annotated, and often traceable to an individual life trajectory and historical period. Carmelo Fierro was an Italian immigrant who came to American in 1902, carrying with him a small cabinet packed with small...

  • Catholic Health Care in the Wild West: A Case Study of Saint Mary’s Hospital in Virginia City, Nevada (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428573] Lisa Machado.

    Virginia City, Nevada was a thriving mining boomtown in the late nineteenth century. Saint Mary’s Hospital provided quality health care to the citizens of Virginia City from 1875 to 1897. Administered by the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul, this private medical institution was greatly influenced by the Catholic Church. Considering its pivotal role as both a religious and social institution, the hospital site can provide great insights into the civic life of a community that was...

  • Catholic Parishes and Colonization: A Frontier Parish in Grand Bay, Dominica (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434223] Steve Lenik.

    The Catholic parishes that were established as units of ecclesiastical jurisdiction are among the range of institutions, including chartered companies, missions, and military installations, deployed by nation-states in the Americas to exert control over the daily lives of African, European, and indigenous peoples. As administrative units in the colonization of newly acquired territories in the Caribbean islands, parishes introduced administrative boundaries and religious personnel who intended...

  • A Ceramic Analysis of a 19th Century Michigan Boarding House (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434008] Brendan Pelto.

    The Clifton site , located on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, was the settlement site for the Cliff Mine, the first profitable copper mine in Michigan. Operating throughout the 1850s and 60s, the town of Clifton began to disappear around 1871 when the Boston and Pittsburgh mining company ceased operations and began to lease out the land to individual prospectors. The Industrial Archaeology program at Michigan Technological University has been performing field work at the...

  • Changes and Choices in Heiltsuk Consumption of Euro-American Goods at Old Bella Bella, BC, 1833-1899 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434106] Michelle Lynch.

    The contact-era Heiltsuk village of Old Bella Bella, British Columbia, site of both HBC Fort McLoughlin (1833-1843) and a Methodist mission (1880-1890), existed during a time of rapid changes. Missionary influence resulted in a shift among the Heiltsuk from traditional longhouses to European-style single-family frame houses, creating two spatially and temporally separate archaeological assemblages. Using data collected during a 1982 excavation of this site, this study compares artifact...

  • "Cherry-Picking" the Material Record of Border Crossings: Artifact Selection and Narrative Construction Among Non-Migrants (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433800] Leah B Mlyn. Jason De León.

    Since 2000, over 4 million people have been apprehended trying to cross without authorization into the U.S. from Mexico via the Arizona desert. During this process millions of pounds of artifacts associated with migration have been left behind. This includes clothes, consumables, and personal effects. Subsequently, humanitarian groups, artists, local U.S. citizens, museum curators, and anthropologists have collected and used these artifacts in a multitude of ways. In this paper we draw on...

  • Chinese Railroad Workers in Wyoming and Mongolia, 1890-1955 (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433886] Dudley Gardner. Adreanna Jensen.

    Chinese railroad laborers, who worked overseas, left a distinct archaeological foot print where ever they lived. Here we want to look at how this footprint is manifested in Mongolia and Wyoming (1890-1955). This comparison considers the similarity in topography and the dissimilarity in the land the immigrants worked in. What is intriguing is the similarity in material culture and spatial organization. We want to briefly present the similarities and dissimilarities between the two experiences,...

  • Church mummies in the northern Ostrobothnia, Finland (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434149] Titta Kallio-Seppä. Timo Ylimaunu. Juho-Antti Junno. Paul R. Mullins. Tiina Väre. Matti Heino. Annamari Tranberg. Sanna Lipkin. Markku Niskanen. Rosa Vilkama. Sirpa Niinimäki. Saara Tuovinen.

    This poster will present the initial analysis of several hundred mummies recovered from a series of Ostrobothnian churches.  The bioarchaeology project by the University of Oulu, Finland analyzed the mummified burials interred underneath the church floors in late-medieval and early modern Sweden.  The poster will examine the mummified burials and the material culture of churches as a single assemblage illuminating the transformation in a late-medieval and early modern Nordic worldview.

  • Claiming a House of Bondage: Examining Spatial Relationships of Domestic Slavery at Montpelier (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 433785] Terry Brock.

    The arrangement of domestic slavery in elite 18th and 19th century homes was built on an unsteady relationship between the enslaved laborers and the owner of the households. At Montpelier, this was amplified by a plantation landscape crafted as an entertainment space, and who's creation and maintenance relied entirely on the obedience and cooperation of enslaved laborers. These laborers lived and worked in and around the Mansion, and were integral to the performance of domesticity that James and...

  • Class and Status in the British Army at Fort Haldimand (1778–1784) (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434064] Douglas Pippin. Aericka Pawlikowski. Kyle Honness.

    During the American Revolutionary War, the British outpost on Carleton Island was an integral connection between the cities of Montréal and Québec, and frontier military posts in the Great Lakes. Situated at the head of the St. Lawrence River, the diverse activity on Carleton Island included a military fortification, naval base, shipyard, merchant warehouses and civilian refugee settlements. In the eighteenth-century British Army, deep class and status differences existed between the officers...

  • Class, Ethnicity, and Ceramic Consumption in a Boston Tenement (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434005] Andrew J. Webster.

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Boston’s North End became home to thousands of European immigrants, mostly from Ireland and Italy. The majority of these immigrant families lived in crowded tenement apartments and earned their wages from low-paying jobs such as manual laborers or store clerks. The Ebenezer Clough House, which was originally built as a single-family colonial home in the early eighteenth century, was repurposed as a tenement in the nineteenth century, becoming...

  • A cod-awful smell: Novel evidence for fisheries management and land use at 17-18th century Ferryland and its social, economic, and sensorial implications (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434123] Eric Guiry.

    In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the Pool Plantation at Ferryland, Newfoundland was a major commercial fishing port and regional seat of power. Turbulence during the Anglo-French wars (1689-1713) resulted in the destruction of the settlement. Though the site is rich in archaeology, little evidence exists to explore how these events changed the community’s physical, economic, and social infrastructure. This poster describes an approach to identifying patterns in past land-use by...

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Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America