Abalone Shell, Broken Pots, Hearths, Windbreaks and Archival Research: Clues to Identifying 19th Century California Abalone Colection and Processing Sites on the Channel Islands

Author(s): Judy Berryman

Year: 2013

Summary

The Chinese abalone and fisheries in California developed in the late 1850s, flourished, and then delcined  in the early 1900s. The majority of California Chinese studies have focused on immigrant populations in established urban Chinatowns. Much less attention has been given to economic strategies and survival mechanisms associated with rural communities, specialized labor camps, or fishing camps. Many of these industries were first developed in the West by Chinese immigrants only to be taken over by Euro-American entrepreneurs. The importance of the fishing industry (specifically abalone) is that the Chinese remaining in control of a highly valued commodity until the late 1880s, During that time they cntinued traditional fishing and cultual practices.

This presentation focuses on the highly successful trade that was developed off the California coast (Channel Islands). Despite the intensity of this industry, no comprehensive attempt has been made to document and interpret the archaeological record.

Cite this Record

Abalone Shell, Broken Pots, Hearths, Windbreaks and Archival Research: Clues to Identifying 19th Century California Abalone Colection and Processing Sites on the Channel Islands. Judy Berryman. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428571)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 517