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Society for Historical Archaeology 2013

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Society for Historical Archaeology 2013


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  •  1,000 Bottles of Wine in the Ground, 1,000 Bottles of Wine: The Preservation of early 20th century Italian Heritage at the John Bradford House (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428722] Sara E. Belkin.

    In 1919, the production of intoxicating beverages was legally prohibited in the United States. However, excavations in the 1970s at the John Bradford House in Kingston, MA indicate that its inhabitants at the turn-of-the-century were consuming large quantities of wine, champagne, and hard liquor. These bottles were consumed and then discarded at a time when the consumption of alcohol was considered immoral by the American middle class. This paper will explore the meaning behind the presence of...

  • The 1725 Nuestra Señora de Begoña: Ongoing Investigations of a Spanish Merchant Fragata and Cultural Conservation Strategies in La Caleta de Caucedo, Dominican Republic (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428294] Matthew J Maus. Charles D Beeker.

    On 21 May 1725 the Spanish merchant vessel Nuestra Señora de Begoña wrecked in La Caleta de Caucedo on the south coast of Hispaniola.  While there was no loss of life, contemporary legal texts pertaining to the sinking event document the complete loss of ship and cargo, ineffective salvage efforts, and the conviction of its captain for contraband silver.  Indiana University has conducted excavations of the shoreward spillage area of the Nuestra Señora de Begoña since 2010.  Preliminary findings...

  • The 1977 Excavations of French Fort St. Pierre (1719-1729): Adaptation on the Louisiane Frontier   (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428560] LisaMarie Malischke.

    Dr. Ian W. Brown excavated the site of French Fort St. Pierre, near Vicksburg, Mississippi, from 1974 to 1976. A 1977 season by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History was never fully reported. As part of a new dissertation project, an initial report as to the contents of this collection will be presented. The artifact assemblage suggests that the garrison and other inhabitants of Fort St. Pierre suffered from a lack of supplies that led them to adapt to frontier life by turning to...

  • 19th century industry in the American South: Scull Shoals Mill Village (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428733] Stacy J. Lundgren. James Wettstaed.

    The shoals of the Oconee River have greatly influenced early American settlement and land use in Georgia, one of the United States’ original thirteen colonies.   Scull Shoals, a major river crossing in what is now Greene County, became the location of a small frontier settlement on the east bank of the Oconee River in the 1790s.  After the turn of the century, industry at the shoals included a water-powered grist mill and Georgia’s first paper mill.  In the following decades, mill operations at...

  • 3D Laser Scanning for the digital reconstruction and analysis of a 16th Century clinker built sailing vessel (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428312] Pat T Tanner.

     Using the Drogheda boat scaled physical model as a starting point, the following paper discusses a methodology that has been created to develop and analyse the hydrostatic and hydrodynamic characteristics of a reconstructed hull form. The physical boat model was 3D laser scanned and virtually modelled using commercially available CAD modelling software. Using boatbuilding experience, the recorded model is then "repaired", rebuilding the entire vessel, including recreating any missing...

  • 3D Modelling and Interactive Mapping of Historic Shipwreck Sites (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428390] Michael J Postons.

    Recent developments in technology have made the process of recording terrestrial archaeological sites a much more digital affair.  The same can now be said for underwater historical sites such as shipwrecks.  This paper will explore through a number of UK and US projects carried out during 2012, showing how shipwrecks can be mapped and modelled in 3D, the process involved, and the exciting public outreach formats that can be created.  From web based interactive 3D shipwreck tours, to game-engine...

  • The 7,000 Foot Wreck – An Archaeological Investigation of a Historic Shipwreck Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428489] Robert Westrick.

    The 7,000 Foot Wreck is the remains of a historic sailing vessel lost in the Gulf of Mexico.  The site lies at a depth of 7,450 feet (2,271 meters) and represents one of the deepest historic shipwrecks investigated in the GOM to date.  The wreck was originally discovered during an oil and gas exploration deep tow survey in 1986.  In September 2009 the first ROV investigation of the 7,000 Foot Wreck was conducted as part of the Lophelia II: Rigs, Reefs, and Wrecks Study.  Over a roughly 15½-hour...

  • Abalone Shell, Broken Pots, Hearths, Windbreaks and Archival Research: Clues to Identifying 19th Century California Abalone Colection and Processing Sites on the Channel Islands (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428571] Judy Berryman.

    The Chinese abalone and fisheries in California developed in the late 1850s, flourished, and then delcined  in the early 1900s. The majority of California Chinese studies have focused on immigrant populations in established urban Chinatowns. Much less attention has been given to economic strategies and survival mechanisms associated with rural communities, specialized labor camps, or fishing camps. Many of these industries were first developed in the West by Chinese immigrants only to be taken...

  • The Adriatic Sea – Underwater Archaeology in Croatia (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428482] Jurica Bezak. Igor Miholjek.

    As the leading team in Croatian underwater archaeology, the Department for Underwater Archaeology of the Croatian Conservation Institute carries out systematic and protective research on underwater archaeological sites along the Croatian coastline of the Adriatic Sea. The Department's field of work covers a large time span and encompasses prehistory, classical antiquity, the Byzantine period, medieval and post-Mediaeval shipwrecks dating from the 11th to the 18th centuries, and wrecks from World...

  • Advanced Digital Modelling of the Newport Medieval Ship (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428316] Toby N. Jones. Nigel Nayling. Pat Tanner.

    Since its discovery in 2002, the remains of the mid 15th century clinker built Newport Medieval Ship have been excavated, cleaned, documented, modelled and are now midway through PEG and freeze-drying conservation treatment. Digital documentation methods, including laser scanning and contact digitising were used extensively. The manufacture and assembly of a 1:10 scale physical model of the vessel remains has provided both construction sequence information and a suitable foundation from which to...

  • African Americans in a Dominican Cemetery: Social Boundaries of an Enclave Community (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428344] Kristen R. Fellows.

    This paper presents preliminary findings from an aboveground study of a cemetery in Samaná, Dominican Republic. In 1824 approximately 200 African Americans left the United States for what was then Haiti, and established an enclave in a relatively isolated area of the island. Their Anglo surnames, Protestantism, and primary use of English have defined this community in relation to the neighboring Dominican and Haitian populations for over 150 years. Using spatial data from the town’s cemetery, I...

  • The Age of Consumption: A Study of Consumer (and Producer) Behavior and the Household (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428509] Stephen Damm.

    Historical archaeologists have long noted the importance of consumer behavior, especially in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. However, archaeological interpretations of consumer behavior tend to focus narrowly on race or status. While anthropologists have often emphasized the importance of factors such as the household's age structure, lifecycle, and kin relationships within the context of the wider community, archaeologists have paid less attention to these factors. Using data from the...

  • Alcohol and Drinking in Historical Archaeological Perspective (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428674] Frederick Smith.

    In 2004, Michael Nassaney told me of his plans for a thematic series in historical archaeology with the University Press of Florida. Since that time the series has emerged and resulted in the publication of a dozen books that provide important insights for archaeologists exploring key issues shaping life in the modern era. Given my work on alcohol studies in the Caribbean, I saw the series as an opportunity to present my particular alcohol-related findings from Barbados. Moreover, while...

  • All change down on the allotment: York’s allotment gardens and urban transition (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428437] Ross J Wilson.

    This paper assesses the development of the allotment gardens in the northern English city of York to demonstrate the processes of urban transition on a scale and on sites which are often overlooked in studies of city life. From the pressures of political reform, social change and environmental concerns, the allotment gardens in the city reflect local, national and international concerns from their origins in the early twentieth century to the present day. Through an assessment of archival...

  • Analyzing Color in Historic Refined Earthenwares Using Spectrophotometry (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428498] John Chenoweth. Alan Farahani.

    This project evaluates three of the most well-known ceramic types in historical archaeology: the non-vitreous, white-bodied earthenwares usually distinguished primarily by color and commonly known as creamware, pearlware, and whiteware. Almost ubiquitous on sites connected to worldwide trade routes from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries, these three wares are some of the most useful, most discussed, and possibly some of the most controversial in archaeological analysis.  Using a...

  • Animals and Humans in Post-medieval York: A View From Hungate (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428223] Clare E Rainsford.

    Excavations at Hungate, in the centre of the city of York, have yielded a substantial assemblage of faunal bone, of which a significant proportion derives from a time period from the 16th century through to the early years of the 20th century. Reworking and residuality of bone pose a significant problem at Hungate, owing to the large quantities of underlying medieval faunal material. This paper will demonstrate that a combination of zooarchaeological, taphonomic and historical approaches provide...

  • Animals, science and empire: London’s animals as scientific objects (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428224] James Morris.

    Urban environments are places of change and discovery, where complex social and cultural boundaries are expressed and altered. As the transition to an industrial society occurred, with the associated intellectual advances and socio-economic developments, the roles and understanding of animals also changed. The 18th and 19th centuries see the increased exploitation and use of animals in physiological studies as scientific disciplines evolved from natural philosophy. These practices were often...

  • Answering the Question, "Where Did We Come From?" Through the Collaborative Efforts of the Fort Ward/Seminary African American Descendant Society and Archaeologists in Alexandria, Virginia (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428737] Mary Furlong. Adrienne T. Washington.

    "We’re still here" has been the theme of the efforts of the Fort Ward/Seminary African American Descendant Society to incorporate the history of their community into the public interpretation of Fort Ward Park and Museum. However, "where did we come from?" remains an important question that has yet to be answered through archaeological and historical research. In this paper, Descendant Society leader Adrienne Washington will discuss the efforts of descendants to answer this question and why it...

  • Antebellum Ceramic Importers of New Orleans, Louisiana (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428507] Sara A. Hahn. Thurston Hahn III.

    New Orleans, Louisiana, has long served as one of the United States’ major port cities, and during the early nineteenth century Liverpool, England,was arguably her strongest trading partner.  Ships transported cotton and tobacco from New Orleans to Liverpool and returned with cargoes of finished goods and building materials.  Among the goods imported to New Orleans of particular interest to archaeologists were ceramics.  Occasionally bearing both manufacturer’s and importer’s marks, it is often...

  • Approaching Eyri: Photographs, Memos and Ruin Memories  (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428617] Þóra Pétursdóttir.

    The use of photography and the meaning of the photograph in our dealings with modern ruins and ruination has been a much discussed topic in workshops, seminars and less formal contexts during the four year life of the Ruin Memories project. This discussion has often been driven by a critique of how photography has come to dominate our approaches, hinting that it may be an "easy way out" – touching the surface of things instead of properly digging them for knowledge. With reference to my work...

  • Arboreal Historical Anchors: Sacred Forests and Memory Making in Southern Benin, West Africa (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428420] Neil Norman.

    The Bight of Benin region is well known as a locale filled with poignant places associated with the trans-Atlantic trade in enslaved individuals. This paper follows recent efforts in the region aimed at writing landscape features into deeper historic narratives and exploring them in terms of broader political and economic processes.  In so doing, it pushes beyond coastal points of loss and into dynamic cosmopolitan interior places.  It argues that the historical and archaeological arc of...

  • An archaeological approach to historic shipwrecks in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428497] Dolores Elkin. Chris Underwood. Mónica Grosso. Cristian Murray.

    In 2010 the Museo del Fin del Mundo (Museum of the End of the World) of the city of Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, initiated a project with the goal of surveying  125 miles along the Atlantic coast of the island in order to record archaeological evidence of any human presence since prehistoric times until the late 19th century AD, when the first non-native people (mostly missionaries) settled in the region. This paper presents the first results of the archaeological study of historic  shipwreck...

  • Archaeological investigations at Brouage (France) : the "Maison Champlain" site (16th-17th centuries) (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428582] Alain Champagne.

    Established in the mid-16th century, the French Atlantic port city of Brouage is surrounded by salt marshes, which produced a valuable commodity that was exported to northern Europe and formed the basis for the city’s early wealth. However a number of factors contributed to the city’s almost immediate decline, so that by the end of the 19th century Brouage was nothing more than a small village of less than one hundred inhabitants. The principal contributing factors were the gradual silting up of...

  • Archaeological Investigations at the Historic Locations of Sulphur Springs, Oklahoma: A GIS-based Investigation of Cultural Rescources Within Chickasaw National Recreation Area (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434127] Jeremy Brunette.

    Sulphur Springs, located in south-central Oklahoma on what is now Chickasaw National Recreation area presents a complex tale of frontier politics. Located around a series of mineral and fresh-water springs, Sulphur Springs was an attempt by European Americans to create a health resort on land owned by the Chickasaw Nation. National politics, including the Dawes Act, and issues involving water quality led to the purchase of the town’s improvements in 1902, and again in 1904. This purchase became...

  • The Archaeological Invisibility of the Urban Immigrant: Examples from 19th and early 20th Century Glasgow & Manchester (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428520] Michael D Nevell.

    The 19th century saw the rapid urban expansion of many industrial cities, through inward migration from the surrounding countryside and overseas, and also by natural population growth. Glasgow and Manchester offer excavated examples of large areas of workers' housing with immigrant populations. This paper will look at the archaeological evidence for immigration on these sites, exploring the variety of material culture available. It will review the lack of archaeological evidence for these...

  • Archaeological Perspectives on American Cemeteries and Gravestones (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428675] Sherene Baugher. Richard Veit.

    This paper provides a brief overview of our forthcoming book on the archaeology of American cemeteries and gravestones. Over the last fifty years archaeologists have analyzed how cemeteries and gravestones reflect and embody changing ideas regarding commemoration and remembrance from the 17th to the 21st centuries. Cemeteries are important repositories of cultural information and gravestones are essentially documents in stone. Moreover the human remains buried in the cemeteries can provide...

  • Archaeological Preservation and the Jesuit-Guarani Missions (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428649] Tobias Vilhena de Moraes.

    This article presents the trajectory of ideas and concepts for Archaeological Preservation, developed during the Administration of Archaeological Heritage at four missionary Archaeological sites in the Southern region of Brazil: São Nicolau, São Lourenço Mártir, São João Batista and São Miguel Arcanjo. From the starting point of an archaeological analysis, and observing the legal and technical norms specified, observation was attempted as to how interface took place with the various areas which...

  • The Archaeological Signature of Stews: Experimental Chopping of Long Bones and Small Fragment Sizes (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428654] adam heinrich.

    For decades, small bone fragments have been interpreted as the residues of stews. In international historical archaeology, stew interpretations have often been loaded with portrayals of groups who were enslaved, underclass, and others who had limited access to sufficient or preferable amounts of food. These groups have been depicted as having faced nutritional struggles where they resorted to extracting maximum nutrients from their resources. Others have been pictured making stews that can...

  • Archaeologically Assembling The Full Picture of the Political-Economy of Late 18th Century Colonial Trade Relations on the Margins of Empire from the Bisc-2 Shipwreck Site. (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428694] Stephen Lubkemann. Charles Lawson. Justine Benanty. Tara Van Niekerk. David Morgan. Sean Reid. John Bright.

    This paper will provide provisional conclusions drawn from the analysis of all our data within a particular methodological framework while identifying critical gaps that remain.  We will first discuss how the BISC-2 site may provide new insights into the political-economy of trade at the permeable boarder of British and Spanish spheres of competing influence; and into the relationship between imperial centers and their often non-compliant peripheries.  Finally, BISC-2 suggests a rethinking of...

  • Archaeologies of Antislavery Resistance (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428679] terrancw weik.

    Archaeologists have explored self-liberated Africans ("Maroons") in the Americas and proponents of collaborative resistance movements (for instance, the Underground Railroad or African-Native American alliances), especially material aspects of them that fall within the period 1600–1865.  Despite this focus, researchers working in the Americas have much to gain from considering the global dimensions of antislavery resistance, a term that will be used to signify any form of defiance against...

  • Archaeology and Informal Education Progams for Youth (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428608] Alexandra Jones.

    Archaeology programs conducted daily by archaeologists make a difference in how citizens perceive their cultural heritage and science. Through educational programs and outreach, archaeologists are inspiring new generations to explore the many fields of archaeological study.  Education programs, which introduce students to archaeology through an informal education model, tend to capture the attention and the interest of students. This approach rests upon the idea that when presented with...

  • Archaeology and the Oil Spill:  Exploration of the Mississippi Barrier Islands as a result of the BP Oil spill (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428747] Andrew J Robinson. Haley J Streuding.

    The Mississippi barrier islands are a collection of publicly accessible, naturally occurring, seacoast defense structures with evidence of Native American occupation, French exploration and colonization and American habitation through World War II.  In 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill occurred, spilling oil across the Gulf of Mexico and onto the Mississippi Barrier Island.  The Mississippi barrier islands consist of Cat, West and East Ship, Horn, and Petit Bois Islands.  As a result of...

  • Archaeology at Iowaville, the 1765–1820 Báxoje (Ioway) Tribe Village on the Des Moines River (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428201] Cynthia L. Peterson. Steven De Vore. Anton Till.

    Iowaville (13VB124), a Báxoje village, housed up to 800 people in southeast Iowa from 1765–1820. Known to archaeologists and collectors for its remarkable surface and metal detector finds––beads, silver ornaments, a large faunal assemblage, and nested copper base-metal kettles containing fur and uncharred seeds––little was known about the site’s preservation or lack thereof. The 2010 fieldwork goal was to assess site integrity in this cultivated farm field. The National Park Service assisted...

  • Archaeology in Real-time:  The Use of Social Media as Part of the Excavation of Anderson’s Blacksmith Shop and Public Armoury (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428324] Lisa E. Fischer. Meredith M. Poole.

    Web 2.0 technologies can provide the public a "behind-the-scenes" look at archaeological excavations, thereby engaging them as the research is happening, not merely after the fact.  Since 2010, archaeological research has been ongoing at Anderson’s Blacksmith Shop and Public Armoury in Williamsburg as part of a project to reconstruct the site.  The archaeological investigations have been featured regularly on both a webcam and reconstruction blog.  The "roving" webcam, which is moved to...

  • Archaeology of a nautical battle: the investigation of the Italian-French brig Mercurio (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428479] Carlo Beltrame.

    The Mercurio was a brig of the Italian-French fleet that was sunk by an English brig in the north Adriatic Sea in 1812. Underwater investigation of the site has allowed the research team to document a part of the prow and the stern and to recover about 900 finds. What are the goals of the investigation of a military ship from the beginning of the 19th century? Can it add new information to our knowledge of ship construction; of the equipment, crew, and everyday life aboard a military ship of...

  • An Archaeology of Aesthetics: the Socio-Economic and Ideological Elements of Coffin Plate Selection at the Spring Street Presbyterian Church (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428686] Katherine Hicks.

    Material shifts among decorative coffin fittings reflect how past populations conceptualized death, memory, and social status.  Coffin plates recovered during the excavation of four burial vaults (ca. 1820-1843) associated with the Spring Street Presbyterian Church, New York City, were simple and uniform in design, inscribed only with the names, ages, and death dates of the individuals with whom they were interred.  This paper examines the socio-economic and ideological elements that may have...

  • An Archaeology of Belonging: A Theory and its Practice in a Colonial Situation (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428529] Melonie R Shier.

    An archaeology of belonging explores a new and developing element in the field of archaeology; using elements of attachment to place with landscape identity as a theoretical tool to look at the colonial and diasporic expansion of non-Amerindian populations into the San Emigdio Hills, South Central California. Although the theme of belonging was recently discussed in the International Journal of Historical Archaeology (published 2012) and some archaeologists have worked with attachment to place...

  • The Archaeology of Citizenship (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428676] Stacey Camp.

    This paper examines how a wide variety of communities and individuals have constituted and articulated what it means to be an American using material culture as a medium of social action. I oscillate back and forth from the institutions imparting ideals about American citizenship to the individuals on the receiving end of such ideological instruction. The vantage point historical archaeology affords permits a reading of citizenship that is multiscaler in methodology, nuancing previous studies of...

  • The Archaeology of Clothing and Bodily Adornment in Colonial America: A Case Study from 18th-century Spanish Texas (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428673] Diana Loren.

    Dress matters. More than purely functional, the color, fabric, and fit of clothing, along with adornments, posture, and manners, convey information on status, gender, bodily health, religious beliefs, and even sexual preferences. Colonial peoples created a language of appearance to express their bodies and identities through unique combinations of locally-made and imported clothing and adornment. In this paper, I discuss the active manipulations and combinations of clothing and adornment in...

  • Archaeology of Colonialism: the 17th Century Spanish Colony of Hoping Dao, Taiwan   (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428645] María Cruz Berrocal. Sandra Montón Subías. Susana Consuegra Rodríguez. Marc Gener Moret.

    We will present an overview of our ongoing archaeological project on  Hoping Dao, Taiwan, where, according to the historical written sources, a Spanish colony was founded in 1626. Starting from the local scale, the excavation of the Spanish colonial posts and Taiwanese native settlements, we aim to understand the reasons, mechanisms and long-term consequences (local, regional and global) of the social interaction that gathered together Europeans, Taiwanese native people (themselves extremely...

  • An archaeology of counter-insurgency: Spanish military trochas and reconcentration camps in Cuba (1895-1898). (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428468] Alberto P. Marti.

    During the Cuban War for Independence, blockhouses and defensive lines (the so-called trochas) were constructed in order to divide the island into separate sectors that could be gradually 'disinfected' of insurgents. The non-combatant population was removed from rural areas and resettled in a number of fortified towns where they would be 'protected' by Spanish troops. This counter-insurgency tactic led to the indiscriminate confinement of hundred thousands of civilians and is usually referred as...

  • The archaeology of cultural interactions in French Guiana (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428399] Catherine Losier.

    The Guyanese cultural map changed just before the arrival of the Europeans in the territory. The first European explorers to reach Guiana therefore met recently restructured Native Amerindian groups. When the French settled and brought with them African slaves to work on their plantations, they increased the ethnic diversity of the Cayenne region. In this perspective, Cayenne Island was an area where cultural interactions and blends between the various groups in place were intense and frequent....

  • The Archaeology of Forts and Battlefields (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428672] David R. Starbuck.

    Forts and battlefields embody the conflicts between nations.  Victory or defeat in past wars has helped determine the shape of modern society.  This paper discusses some of the most dynamic and exciting archaeological projects ever conducted at sites of military conflict throughout the United States.  Using case studies from all of the major conflicts fought on American soil, this paper discusses how archaeologists use modern scientific techniques to discover the remains of forts, battlefields,...

  • The Archaeology of Gender in Historic America (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428664] Deb Rotman.

    Gendered social relations are fundamental to human experience. The ways in which individuals understand their roles as gendered beings and their relationships to other gendered beings is constantly pushed and pulled by forces both internal and external to the individual and the family/social/economic unit to which they belong at multiple scales from the household to the community to the nation. Identity, sexuality, cultural prescriptions for social roles, socioeconomic class, ethnic heritage,...

  • The Archaeology of Irish Railroad Laborers in Mid-Nineteenth Century Virginia: Findings from the First Field Season (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428205] Amanda B. Johnson. Stephen A. Brighton.

    In 1850 the landscape 15 miles west of Charlottesville was dramatically altered as thousands of Irish immigrants were brought to the area to construct the Blue Ridge Railroad. The dangerous work consisted of several cuts and tunnels. One of the more difficult projects was the Blue Ridge or Afton tunnel. At its completion it stretched just under a mile and at the time was one of the longest tunnels in American history. During the summer of 2012, the excavations focused on standing dry-laid stone...

  • The Archaeology of Pineapples: An excavation of a Vinery-Pinery in Scotland (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428307] Doug Rocks-Macqueen.

    This paper reviews the most recent finds from the multi-year excavation at Aimsfield Walled Garden, the largest walled garden in Scotland (debated), in East Lothian, Scotland. It includes an examination of the surrounding landscape and how this was altered to provide a unique view and projection of power and wealth. The recent excavations of the vinery-pinery are presented to show an example of how pineapples were grown in Scotland in the 1700s and into the 1800s. The connection this site has to...

  • The Archaeology of Religion in America (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428677] Richard Veit. Sherene Baugher.

    This paper provides a brief overview of our forthcoming book on the historical archaeology of religious beliefs and practices in America.  The archaeology of religion has included traditional fieldwork, as well as aboveground archaeology.  Many archaeologists have focused their attention on religious communities and places of worship: churches, Quaker meeting houses, Jewish synagogues, Buddhist temples, Pueblo kivas and Mormon temples.  In California, the Southwest, Southeast, and Northeast,...

  • The archaeology of ship communication: Preliminary study of an early 17th-century Dutch poste restante in the Indian Ocean (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428711] Wendy Van Duivenvoorde.

    On their way to the East Indies, seamen of Dutch East India Company ships chiselled messages into rocks and boulders and, at the base of these rocks, often left letters, carefully wrapped in layers of canvas and tar and sealed inside lead envelopes. The idea was that the crew of the next Dutch ship to anchor in that same place would pen down the message on the rock and collect the letters. Examples of these so-called ‘postal stones’ have been found on St Helena Island, at the Cape of Good Hope...

  • The archaeology of Slavery in Southern Brazil in Global Perspective (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428352] Lucio Menezes Ferreira.

    Slavery in southern Brazilian plantations was a late colonial development, and  was the result of the expansion of industrial relations in Europe and the expansion of capitalism worldwide. On the other hand, social relations in plantations were not only capitalist and linked to the market, but were the result of patriarchal society. The archaeological study of jerked beef plantations has helped to reveal all of these features, as the material culture of the sites is both imported and linked to a...

  • The Archaeology of the North American Fur Trade (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428665] Michael Nassaney.

    The fur trade was a multi-faceted, global phenomenon that had a formative influence on the history and cultures of post-Contact North America. Archaeological investigations of fur trade-related sites coincide with the inception of historical archaeology. This paper begins with a brief historical overview of the fur trades and summarizes some of the interpretive frameworks that have been employed to impose spatial and temporal order on this large-scale process. It also discusses the...

  • The Archaeology of the People’s Century? (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428253] David Sables.

    The 20th century has widely been portrayed in the British media as the people’s century. This paper will examine the part played by archaeologists in the formation of this idea which, in my opinion, not only fails to reflect many of the stresses within British society, but also underplays the value of significant areas of British heritage. The result is that large sections of the recent past are seen as something that is ‘best not talked about’ to the public (Faull, pers comm, 2011) and the...

  • Archaeology, Cosmology and African Ritual Past. Perspectives from Yikpabongo, Koma Land, Northern Region, Ghana (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428422] Benjamin Kankpeyeng.

    The legacies of the slave trade in northern Ghana recognized in the traditions/memories of peoples of the area include vanished communities within vast territories today represented by archaeological assemblages. These archaeological regions suffered from raids resulting in the enslavement or dispersal of the inhabitants. Koma Land is located within such an archaeological region and contains unique mounds with insightful information for understanding the cosmological beliefs of the populations...

  • Archaeology, Memory and Community: Widening Engagement with Historical Archaeology (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428610] Paul Belford.

    Telford was created as a 'new town' in the 1960s in a former industrial area, partly to regenerate what was perceived to be a derelict landscape. The new town initially had a divisive effect on long-established local communities. This paper describes an ongoing project which seeks to heal some of these divisions by working with local communities and other stakeholders to explore some of the area's neglected archaeology and heritage. The project has evolved from a 'top down' approach to a more...

  • Archaeometallurgy of an 18th Century Shipwreck: The Sloop-of-war HMS Swift (1770), Santa Cruz, Argentina (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428634] Nicolás C. Ciarlo.

    During the 18th century, the maritime context occupied an outstanding place regarding the process of transformation and geographic expansion of the main maritime powers, which had worldwide impact on social, political, and economical relationships. Within this context, many technological changes took place, some of them related to British naval metallurgy.   This paper presents the research results carried on the metallic artifacts from the sloop-of-war HMS Swift,lost off Puerto Deseado...

  • "Arming the Roanoke Colony": Illustrating Bellicosity through Archival and Archaeological Findings (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434161] Erwin Walker Lane. Brent Lane.

    Sir Walter Ralegh’s attempted English colony in coastal North Carolina is best known for thefailure of its 1587 "Lost Colony". But that colony was preceded by a 1585-86 exploratorysettlement that accomplished much of its mission to explore and describe the region’s lands, flora, fauna and peoples. Officially peaceful, this "First Colony" nonetheless engaged in military actions with indigenous peoples. Although direct archaeological evidence of its military capability is scant, a...

  • Arms Across the Atlantic: The Faux Blakely Rifles and their North Carolina Connection (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428272] Lawrence Babits. Peter Norris. Gregory Stratton.

    A cannon used by North Carolina Confederates was captured by the Union navy during the Civil War and placed as a trophy in Washington, DC. In 1973, a similar cannon was recovered from the Roanoke River below Fort Branch, a Confederate fortification blocking upstream navigation. The production identification numbers (136, 138) suggested they came from the same shipment. Their initial identification as Blakely rifled cannon is challenged here by connecting the two guns to specifications for cannon...

  • Artefacts of transformation: the material culture of Black Loyalists in late eighteenth century Atlantic Canada. (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428580] Philippa Puzey-Broomhead.

    In 1784, approximately 3,000 Black people who had joined the British during the American Revolutionary War were evacuated from New York to Nova Scotia, alongside several thousand other Loyalist refugees. This poster explores the transformative powers of three items of material culture in the creation and maintenance of a Black Loyalist identity in what is now Atlantic Canada: the book in which their names were recorded prior to their evacuation from New York; the uniform coat worn by one of the...

  • The Artifact Assemblage of the Warwick (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428378] Joshua T. Harden.

    This paper is a preliminary analysis of the artifacts recovered from the Warwick shipwreck. Over the course of three field seasons from 2010 to 2012, numerous artifacts were recovered from the site. Artifact types will be described briefly and a historical context given. Basic groups will be created to categorize the artifacts and will include cargo, armament, and rigging. Statistics will be compiled for each category and for individual artifact types within the groups. The ultimate goal is to...

  • Artifact Conservation: Problems, Solutions, and Explorations (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428196] John R. Bratten.

    Artifact conservation is a necessary step for most archaeology projects, especially those involving the recovery of objects from underwater sites. In addition to stabilization, laboratory treatment often aids in the interpretations of artifacts.  Based on two decades of laboratory work, this paper will discuss conservation lessons learned in terms of equipment and techniques.  Information will be provided related to the choice of an x-ray machine, the fabrication of electrolysis tanks, the...

  • Assessing Environmental Impacts on Shipwreck Sites: Results & Lessons Learned from the 2009-2012 Gulf of Mexico Shipwreck Study (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428359] Matthew E Keith. Amanda M Evans.

    Shipwreck sites are subject to large scale oceanographic and environmental processes which can impact interpretation of the site as well as the stability of the wreck itself.  Along the Outer Continental Shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico, alluvial deposits comprised of varying quantities of clays, silts, and sands dominate the seafloor.  The movement of these deposits through both ongoing processes (such as currents and waves) and punctuated events (such as hurricanes) significantly impact...

  • Back in Black Bottom:  The Changing Form of African American Burial Practices in a North Carolina Cemetery (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428661] Jonathan P Smith.

    The Black Bottom Memorial Cemetery is an African American community cemetery in Belhaven, North Carolina which was in use throughout the 20th century.  Mapping and surface survey of the cemetery revealed a large number of burials with significant, temporally linked, variation in burial practices.  Multiple factors including economic status and the effects of segregation and other discriminatory practices are suggested as contributing to this variation.  Comparison of the Black Bottom Memorial...

  • Bajo Hornos Reef, Veracruz: a depositional trap for ships and related cultural material (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428708] Ricardo Borrero. Flor Trejo. Roberto Junco.

    From the arrival of Cortes in 1519 until the 20th century, Veracruz was one of the most important ports in the Americas. In addition to its role in transatlantic trade, it also played an essential role in maritime relations between Mexico, the Antilles and the northern Gulf of Mexico. In the 80´s, late 90´s and 2010 diving surveys carried out at Bajo Hornos reef by the Underwater Archeology team (SAS) of the Mexican National Institute for Anthropology and History (INAH), yielded a variety of...

  • Bark in the Fosse?  The Implications of Birch Bark Remains at an 18th Century Fort Site.  (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428209] Andrew R Beaupre.

    Nearly two meters beneath the modern ground surface, the remains of a birch bark construction rest in a state of near perfect preservation for over two hundred years.  In the summer of 2012, a team of archaeologists from Université Laval and the College of William and Mary uncovered this unique artifact.   The site of this artifact’s recovery lies in the contested waterway of the Lake Champlain-Richelieu River Corridor. During the 18th century this ‘Valley of Forts’ saw the swing of borders,...

  • Battle for the Castle: A Post-Medieval Approach to Castle Studies (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428457] Lila Rakoczy.

    In Archaeology journals across the UK, the medieval castle is still being fought over. This war of interpretations, still largely centered on the military vs. non-military nature of castles, has been one cause among many for the current stagnation of castle studies. This paper will argue that retreading old research ground (and rehashing old arguments) is ultimately unproductive, and that far more interesting questions deserve to be asked of these ‘medieval’ buildings. A case will be made for a...

  • Beating the Bounds (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428265] Julia King.

    "Beating the bounds" was a typically local but highly symbolic and even quasi-religious ritual or custom originating in medieval England that served to mark the territorial limits of the village or parish.  This paper uses material culture, including landscape, to examine how Charles Calvert, the third Lord Baltimore, used everyday travel in Maryland as a colonial form of beating the bounds. Calvert’s travel was driven in part because of the heavy investment his family had made in the colony,...

  • Becoming the ‘other’?: Exploring mimetic practice in the Ulster Plantation (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428301] Audrey Horning.

    Mimesis involves the interpretation and imitation of behaviour. Crucially, it is a strategy employed not only by the ‘colonised other’, but also by those in authority engaging with and endeavouring to understand the behaviour of those over whom they wielded power. Far from settling an unpopulated colonial wilderness, those few planters who made their way to Ulster in the early seventeenth century were thrust into a populated Gaelic world where their survival depended upon a process of...

  • Becoming Urban – Emerging Urban Food Culture in Early Modern Tornio, Northern Finland (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428221] Anna-Kaisa Salmi.

    This paper focuses on emerging urban food culture in Tornio, a small town in Northern Finland, between AD 1621 and 1800. Tornio was founded in 1621 in Northern Finland, which at that time was a part of the Swedish kingdom. The population of the new urban centre was a mixture of local peasants and merchants from other towns of Sweden. Tornio was a dynamic boom town where people of different origins came together, forming a new urban community and a new urban food culture. Zooarchaeological...

  • Below sea-level. Combining Palaeolithic and Underwater Archaeology in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428485] Christina Papoulia.

    The area of the eastern Mediterranean is a focal point for the study of the earliest acts of globalisation. Palaeolithic archaeology provides the tools for the analysis and interpretation of the material record of the early hominins who passed through and occupied this part of the world. However, since the early pleistocene, the constant environmental fluctuations between glacials and interglacials have caused major alterations in the ice sheets resulting in sea-level fluctuations. Consequently,...

  • The Benefits of Educating Young Professionals about Archaeological Conservation (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428700] Emily A Williams. Lisa Young.

    While archaeological conservation is still a relatively new field, it is not much younger than the field of historical archaeology.  Literature searches mention "conservation" or preservation in many of the text books used to educate and train archaeology students in this country and archaeologists agree about the necessity of conserving finds.  Yet courses in archaeological conservation remain strangely absent from the curriculum of many of the well-established and prominent archaeology...

  • The "Better sort" and the "Poorer Sort": Wealth Inequalities, Family Formation and the Economy of Energy on British Caribbean Sugar Plantations, 1750-1807 (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428281] Justin L Roberts.

    The occupations held by the enslaved on sugar plantations shaped the formation of enslaved families and communities. There was a hierarchy within slave communities on sugar plantations which drew on the occupations slaves held in the working world. Elite slave family groups emerged on plantations and they tended to hold the most privileged work positions and to pass them down to the next generation. Slaves who held the most privileged occupations had more opportunity to earn money, acquire food...

  • Between City and Country: New 'Urban' Landscapes of the Industrial Period (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428447] Paul Belford.

    Industrialisation in England is often associated with urbanisation. Yet outside the major conurbations, many industrial settlements retained an essentially rural character. Although they contained ‘urban’ elements such as streets, rows of housing, churches and pubs, these settlements nestled within a predominantly rural landscape, and their inhabitants sustained semi-rural lifestyles – growing food, keeping animals and actively hunting and fishing. Using excavated examples from the East...

  • Between consumption and extermination: archaeologies of modern imperialism (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428461] Alfredo González-Ruibal.

    In this introduction to the session, an outline of the existing and possible archaeologies of imperialism will be sketched. Emphasis will be put on the potential of archaeology to construct alternative narratives on Western colonialism from the mid-nineteenth century onwards. It will be argued that this kind of archaeology has to take into account violence (both physical and symbolic), but also forms of hybridization, war as well as trade and exchange, open and subtle resistance, and hegemonic...

  • Between Dirt and Digital: Finding New Ways to Record Old Stuff! (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434155] Shane Sparks. Melissa Cascella.

    In this day and age, technology is advancing by leaps and bounds on a daily basis. In some cases, these advances can be incorporated into common or repetitive archaeological methods to improve efficiency, accuracy, and, in some cases, sanity. This poster will present the explorations of two archaeologists, who also have GIS experience, into several new technological advances that have the potential to be used in archaeological contexts. Explorations will include a look at hand-held devices...

  • Between the dream and the conquest: settlement and daily life of the Portuguese in North Africa (15th-16th centuries) (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428647] Joana Bento Torres. Luís Carlos Serrão Gil. André P. S. D. Teixeira.

    The Portuguese presence in North Africa was materialized through the occupation of cities and fortresses along the coast, especially during the 15th and the first half of the 16th century. Traditional historiography has stressed the limited contact these strongholds held with their surrounding territory, underlining their highly military nature.                                    In this paper we wish to re-evaluate this theory, mainly through the archaeological work we've been developing since...

  • Beyond material culture: virtual ship reconstruction (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428313] Tiago M Fraga.

    In the case of virtual ship reconstruction, the boundaries between fiction and science are hard to define. In attempting a ship reconstruction, the freedom provided by computer-assisted endeavors often clashes with the limitations of the historical archaeology data. Drawing on the expertise derived from several case studies, some ground rules are proposed in the hope of locating the border between these two approaches that will keep proposed reconstructions in the realm of science.

  • The bigger the cow the better she is’: new archaeological perspectives on livestock ‘improvement’ in late medieval and early modern England (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428222] RM Thomas. M Holmes. James Morris.

    In recent years, zooarchaeologists have become increasingly interested in exploring the timing and nature of ‘improvements’ in animal husbandry in later medieval and early modern England. These studies have identified that size and shape changes occurred from the 14th to the 17th centuries. However, the picture is complex: outlying sites experience later developments than central localities and there is considerable variation in the timing of size changes for different species at different...

  • Bioarchaeological and Archival Investigations of the Milwaukee County Institution Grounds Cemetery Collection: A Progress Report (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428680] Brooke L. Drew.

    Continuing bioarchaeological and archival research on the Milwaukee County Institution Grounds Cemetery collection is presented.  As reported elsewhere, the beginning stages of a multidisciplinary analysis of this late 19th and early 20th century institutional cemetery has led to the identification of a number of the 1,649 individuals excavated.  Included in this discussion will be new case studies that continue to demonstrate not only the interpretive potential of an integrated archaeological,...

  • The BISC 2 Cargo (Part I)--Contributions and Questions from Ceramics Analysis: Late 18th Century Sequencing and Colonial Trade patterns (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428692] Chuck Lawson. Stephen Lubkemann. David Morgan. Justine Benanty. Ken Wild. Jaco Boshoff. Sean Reid.

    The BISC-2 site uniquely contains thousands of fragments of late 18th century English ceramics dating from the period of transition from stone-glazed salt ware to cream ware, including hundreds of examples of both of these manufactured types that share decorative patterning. The fact that this assemblage (arguably one of the largest of late 18th century ceramics located to date in North America) was created through a wrecking event that occurred quite literally as a single instance in time...

  • The BISC 2 Cargo Part II--Prestige Cargo or Evidence of Colonial Dumping? An Exploration of What Key Items in BISC 2's Cargo of Ceramics May say About center/periphery trade relations in the Late North American British Empire (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428690] Justine Benanty. Charles Lawson. Stephen Lubkemann. Ken Wild.

    This paper will focus on what a set of very specific items documented in the BISC-2 cargo may indicate about relations between the Bristih imperial center and amongst various levels of its periphery--including Jamaica and North America--during the last third of the 18th century. We will focus in particular on: 1) a coloration pattern that is ubiquitous on the site that has been documented as having a limited production life and as destined for dumping in a colobial market considered less...

  • Blurring Disciplinary Boundaries: Historical Archaeological Investigations at St. Nicholas Abbey Sugar Plantation (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428280] Stephanie Bergman. Frederick Smith.

    Since 2007 faculty and students from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia have conducted archaeological investigations at St. Nicholas Abbey sugar plantation, one the most important heritage site in Barbados. The interdisciplinary research program developed for the site seeks to uncover evidence that will help in the restoration, preservation, and celebration of this important historic landmark. While deeds, maps, paintings, and other documentary sources offer insights into...

  • Bodies Lying in State: Nationalism, the Past, and Identity  (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428725] Margaret A Comer.

    In the twenty-first century, nationalism continues to be a powerful motivating ideology in global, national, and local politics.  In the hope of overtly and covertly strengthening cohesive nationalist sentiment and identity, individual states often use the very bodies of past peoples as symbols and ideological tools. This is evidenced in the differing display (or lack thereof) of human remains in the national museums of Denmark, Egypt, and the United States.  In each case, the identification of...

  • BOOM BABY!": engaging the public through social media in response to "American Digger (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428330] Tonia Deetz Rock. Misti Furr. Kurt Thomas Hunt. Katie Jacobson. Kristina Wyckoff.

    In this paper we present our public outreach efforts in response to the American "reality" television series "American Digger," which portrays looting of archaeological resources as a desirable and profitable enterprise at the expense of archaeological context and communal knowledge of our past.  Our efforts included blog posts, the creation and dissemination of a Change.org petition, and the facilitation of involvement and open dialogue through the creation and ongoing administration of a...

  • BOOM BABY!: Archaeology and the ethics of edutainment (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428604] Charles Ewen.

    Archaeologists in the United States have been horrified by the debut of new reality shows featuring treasure hunters looting sites for fun and profit.  Most troubling was that one of these shows, "Diggers", was the brainchild of the National Geographic Society, long time supporters of archaeology.  Meetings with National Geographic have shown them willing to compromise to make the shows more ethical if they could still be profitable. However, the real question is, how willing are...

  • Boys and Their Toys: Masculine spaces in eighteenth-century York (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428311] Matthew Jenkins.

    This paper highlights the potential of material culture to challenge and nuance historical accounts of large-scale cultural transformations in the Georgian period, such as urban improvement and domestic privacy. It explores how the detailed analysis of houses and the changes made to their fabric, form and function, sheds light on their changing uses and meanings over time. When combined with the study of diaries, maps, newspapers, wills, illustrations and early photographs, it can be used to...

  • Bristol Houses: the Order of Merchant Capitalism in England's Second City (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428234] Roger H Leech.

    A survey of housing in medieval and early modern Bristol provides insights into how the urban elite overtly or less obviously reinforced social inequality and hierarchy.  Some of these elements of urban culture relate to those identified elsewhere, notably in the writings of Glassie, Deetz and Leone with reference to the vernacular architecture and social structure of 18th-century North America, the use of classical architecture, falling gardens and baroque street plans.  Other elements...

  • A British (?) Shipwreck Site in the Natuna Islands of Indonesia: The Presence and The Need to Preserve (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428491] Nia NH Ridwan.

    This paper highlights a possible British shipwreck in the Natuna Islands of Indonesia, found by the Ministry of Marine Affairs in 2011; the site has been looted by local people due to poverty and lack of awareness of the site's heritage value. The shipwreck has produced ceramics, bottle glass, and metal artifacts. The factors threatening the site include human activity, physical threats caused by movement or changes in water circulation, and chemical threats (i.e. corrosion). The site offers...

  • British Colonial Trade Goods in the Nevada Frontier (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428578] Ian Springer. Steven Holm.

    In the mid 19th century, Virginia City, Nevada attracted people from all over world by producing a steady stream of silver and gold that lined pockets and coffers around the world. During the summer of 2010, excavations were performed along South Howard Street, Virginia City by the University of Nevada, Reno in an effort to uncover evidence of community identity. Many artifacts were recovered, including a container seal bearing a George Whybrow Company logo, along with the name of its export...

  • Bruno's blueprint (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428217] Cassie Newland.

    ANT-archaeology (another hyphen I know!) is all about how we build our worlds. In a relational world where does fieldwork start? Where does it stop? And what part do we play as authors? This paper takes Bruno Latour's Reassembling the social as a blueprint for fieldwork (except the last chapter, which was a bit of a cop-out) and translates it into materially grounded archaeological methodology. The result is a whistle stop tour of the 1879 Cape Telegraph Cable taking in Chilean mining, Swedish...

  • Building Colonialism: Nineteenth-Century Colonial Tanzania and its Urban Representation (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428460] Daniel Rhodes.

    Tanzania’s coastal harbour towns underwent phenomenally rapid transformation from the mid 1800s to the early 1900s. This was the result of British and German colonialism and the development of a new capitalist system of economic and social control. This new western design served to re-define the earlier systems of capitalist exchange within the formally Omani dominated Swahili Coast.  The various systems of appropriation and reorganisation are represented in the urban landscape and resulted in...

  • Building relevant capacity in implementing Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage programs (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428712] William F. Jeffery. Robert Parthesius.

    The CIE-Centre for International Heritage Activities has been very active in implementing Maritime and Underwater Cultural Heritage (MUCH) capacity building programs in a number of countries in southern Africa, Asia and the Pacific. While the UNESCO 2001 Convention and the Nautical Archaeology Society training programs are used as frameworks in the principles and practices for the programs, they are implemented in a manner and over a time that is considered relevant to each country. This comes...

  • Buoyancy and Stability of the Warwick: Analytical Study of Ballast  (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428374] Jeffrey R Delsescaux. Piotr T Bojakowski.

    For the past three years, archaeologists have been carefully excavating the remains of the early 17th-Century English vessel Warwick on the bottom of Castle Harbor, Bermuda.  Although the wreck was partially salvaged in the 1970’s, leaving much of the ballast rocks scattered around the site and unrecorded, there was a small portion of ballast found intact during the 2011 field season. This intact section yielded some interesting artifacts and allowed for better insights into 17th-Century...

  • Burial and Remembrance: The Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428720] Patricia B. Richards. Brooke L. Drew.

    Fieldwork in 1992 and 1993 on the grounds of the Milwaukee County Regional Medical Center, Milwaukee Wisconsin, resulted in recovery of some 1600 individuals originally buried in the institutional or "poor farm" cemetery. This paper argues that the conflict inherent in a public policy intended to provide a decent burial while simultaneously discouraging utilization of the service can only be understood within a broader historical context. Milwaukee’s population increased from 20,000 in 1850 to...

  • "But I'm Not Dead Yet:"  A Comparison of Medicinal Choices Made by the Chinese in the American West (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428435] Olivia A. McDaniel. Mark Warner.

    Explorations of Chinese occupied sites in the United States have often commented on the presence of Chinese medicines on those sites and how those products represent the continuity of Chinese practices.  What has received considerably less attention is the use of Euroamerican patent medicines by Chinese immigrants.  Recent excavations in Sandpoint, Idaho have provided a unique opportunity to explore this issue.  Excavations of a Chinese residence/business resulted in the recovery of...

  • Button, Button, Who's Got the Button: Uncovering Clues to the Garrison of Fort George, Turks and Caicos Islands (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428455] Neal Hitch.

    In November 2010, the Turks and Caicos National Museum led the first archaeological investigation of Fort George Cay, a small uninhabited island in the Turks and Caicos. The collection of multiple regimental buttons offered clues to who actually garrisoned the fort. Very little of the history of Fort St George (now named Fort George) has been documented. This presentation provides detailed descriptions of the buttons found and the regiments that served at the fort. Originally built in 1795 by...

  • Buzz-word or paradigm shift? Some comments on "Medieval Archaeology", "Post-medieval Archaeology" and the rise of "Historical Archaeology" (a German perspective) (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428405] Ulrich Müller.

    In recent years "Historical Archaeology" has undergone a cometlike rise. Traditional pre- and protohistoric archaeology has had a hard time in accepting the conceptual design of "Historical Archaeology". Also, other disciplines (like art history or medieval history) have had issues with a concept that blurred established chronologies and disciplines. What does "Historical Archaeology" mean in Germany? A container without contents, a cross-cultural approach, or a...

  • Camp Lawton:  Life and Death of a Civil War Prison (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428574] Sue Moore. J. Kevin Chapman. Amanda L. Morrow.

    In 2010 Georgia Southern University began a long term project to investigate and interpret Camp Lawton Prison near Millen, Georgia.  This prison had a short lifespan, only six weeks to construct and six weeks of occupation and yet it has proven to have one of the most intact prisoner occupation areas of any Civil War prison in the United States.  Results of work so far have demonstrated the efficacy of metal detection use in the prisoner occupation area, developed a conservation strategy for...

  • Canadians Abroad in 1927: The Ashbridges do England! (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428261] Dena Doroszenko.

    The Ashbridge family were one of the founding families in Toronto and their homestead represents the earliest still remaining within the City. The Ashbridge estate collection as donated to the Trust included household and personal artifacts, and archival documents. These document the personal characteristics, tastes and influences which affected six generations of the family. Archaeological excavations have occurred on the property in 1987-1988, and from 1997 until 2001. Within the ceramic...

  • ‘Carmelo’s Cabinet’: The Material Culture of Collections in the Anthracite Region of Pennsylvania (2015)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 434132] Judith P Joklik. Michael P Roller.

    Personal collections of objects reflect individual orderings of the material world, particularly when they encompass the realms of work, domestic life, health, aesthetics and religion. As complete sets, they are like an idealized version of an archaeological assemblage: intact, curated, annotated, and often traceable to an individual life trajectory and historical period. Carmelo Fierro was an Italian immigrant who came to American in 1902, carrying with him a small cabinet packed with small...

  • Casa de Polvora – a gun powder factory site, Panelim, Goa, India (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428546] Nizamuddin Taher. Rohini Ambekar. Abhijit Ambekar.

    The Portuguese rule in Goa, India has left behind a lot of tangible remains in the form of antiquities.  These include religious structures and secular edifices including equipments used for some specific purpose or common house hold articles.  One such site that is of interest to the authors is the Gun Powder Factory at Panelim, similar to one at Barcarena (near Lisbon). Owing to its curious history it finds mention from time to time in many of the reports of Portuguese governors. Gun powder...

  • Catawba Foodways: Exploring Native and Colonial Influences (2013)
    Citation DOCUMENT [ID: 428641] Ashley Peles.

    In the 18th century the Catawba held a key position in the Southeast, drawing a number of groups from the North Carolina Piedmont down to South Carolina to join them; ultimately these groups coalesced into the Catawba Nation.  Projects undertaken by the Research Laboratories of Archaeology at UNC have investigated some of these previous 17th century communities in the North Carolina Piedmont, as well as a number of 18th-19th century Catawba households in South Carolina.  This paper uses...

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