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An archaeology of counter-insurgency: Spanish military trochas and reconcentration camps in Cuba (1895-1898).

Author(s): Alberto P. Marti

Year: 2013

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Summary

During the Cuban War for Independence, blockhouses and defensive lines (the so-called trochas) were constructed in order to divide the island into separate sectors that could be gradually 'disinfected' of insurgents. The non-combatant population was removed from rural areas and resettled in a number of fortified towns where they would be 'protected' by Spanish troops. This counter-insurgency tactic led to the indiscriminate confinement of hundred thousands of civilians and is usually referred as the ultimate origin of the modern concept of concentration camp. Despite this, little research seems to have been carried out on the spatial dimension of this process, on how it actually took place on the ground, or on the extent to which it changed the landscape. I will argue that conflict archaeology might contribute to understand the way it was implemented, its long-term repercussions upon people and places, and how the memories of this tragedy still persist.


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An archaeology of counter-insurgency: Spanish military trochas and reconcentration camps in Cuba (1895-1898).. Alberto P. Marti. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428468)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -8.158; min lat: 49.955 ; max long: 1.749; max lat: 60.722 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 347

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America