1,000 Bottles of Wine in the Ground, 1,000 Bottles of Wine: The Preservation of early 20th century Italian Heritage at the John Bradford House

Author(s): Sara E. Belkin

Year: 2013

Summary

In 1919, the production of intoxicating beverages was legally prohibited in the United States. However, excavations in the 1970s at the John Bradford House in Kingston, MA indicate that its inhabitants at the turn-of-the-century were consuming large quantities of wine, champagne, and hard liquor. These bottles were consumed and then discarded at a time when the consumption of alcohol was considered immoral by the American middle class. This paper will explore the meaning behind the presence of these wine bottles that belonged to an Italian immigrant family, the Acollas, who consumed and possibly manufactured wine within their new life in a foreign country that eventually prohibited alcohol sale and manufacture. This paper will examine themes of ethnic and immigrant identity and the preservation of heritage by using the remnants of wine drinking to discuss how the act of consumption shaped and impacted the Acolla’s own identity within a foreign society.

Cite this Record

 1,000 Bottles of Wine in the Ground, 1,000 Bottles of Wine: The Preservation of early 20th century Italian Heritage at the John Bradford House. Sara E. Belkin. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428722)

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Keywords

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 503