The Archaeology of Clothing and Bodily Adornment in Colonial America: A Case Study from 18th-century Spanish Texas

Author(s): Diana Loren

Year: 2013

Summary

Dress matters. More than purely functional, the color, fabric, and fit of clothing, along with adornments, posture, and manners, convey information on status, gender, bodily health, religious beliefs, and even sexual preferences. Colonial peoples created a language of appearance to express their bodies and identities through unique combinations of locally-made and imported clothing and adornment. In this paper, I discuss the active manipulations and combinations of clothing and adornment in expressions of identity that took place at 18th-century Presidio Los Adaes, a multiethnic community located on the edge of Spanish Texas.

Cite this Record

The Archaeology of Clothing and Bodily Adornment in Colonial America: A Case Study from 18th-century Spanish Texas. Diana Loren. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428673)

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Keywords

Temporal Keywords
18th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 161