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Archaeology and the Oil Spill:  Exploration of the Mississippi Barrier Islands as a result of the BP Oil spill

Author(s): Andrew J Robinson ; Haley J Streuding

Year: 2013

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Summary

The Mississippi barrier islands are a collection of publicly accessible, naturally occurring, seacoast defense structures with evidence of Native American occupation, French exploration and colonization and American habitation through World War II.  In 2010, the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill occurred, spilling oil across the Gulf of Mexico and onto the Mississippi Barrier Island.  The Mississippi barrier islands consist of Cat, West and East Ship, Horn, and Petit Bois Islands.  As a result of the BP Oil Spill, National Park Service archaeologists, contract archaeologists, and oil spill recovery personnel had the opportunity to survey the islands, producing a number of previously unknown historic and pre-historic archaeological sites.  The oil spill had positive and negative results such as the aforementioned discoveries and oil contamination on archaeological sites.  This paper explores the BP oil spill and the history and archaeology of the Mississippi barrier islands.


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Cite this Record

Archaeology and the Oil Spill:  Exploration of the Mississippi Barrier Islands as a result of the BP Oil spill. Andrew J Robinson, Haley J Streuding. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428747)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 671

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America