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The 7,000 Foot Wreck – An Archaeological Investigation of a Historic Shipwreck Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico

Author(s): Robert Westrick

Year: 2013

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Summary

The 7,000 Foot Wreck is the remains of a historic sailing vessel lost in the Gulf of Mexico.  The site lies at a depth of 7,450 feet (2,271 meters) and represents one of the deepest historic shipwrecks investigated in the GOM to date.  The wreck was originally discovered during an oil and gas exploration deep tow survey in 1986.  In September 2009 the first ROV investigation of the 7,000 Foot Wreck was conducted as part of the Lophelia II: Rigs, Reefs, and Wrecks Study.  Over a roughly 15½-hour period on September 6 and 7, 2009, the Lophelia II team used Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute’s Jason II ROV launched from the NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown to document the shipwreck site.  This paper will focus on the results of that investigation and subsequent analysis and research.


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Cite this Record

The 7,000 Foot Wreck – An Archaeological Investigation of a Historic Shipwreck Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico. Robert Westrick. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Leicester, England, U.K. 2013 ( tDAR id: 428489)


Keywords


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 230

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America