Gulf of Mexico (Other Keyword)

1-12 (12 Records)

19th Century Workhorses: The Examination of a Centerboard Schooner off Dog Island, Florida. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Horrell.

Between 2001 and 2003, the Dog and St. George Islands Shipwreck Survey, a research project conducted by the Florida State University Program in Underwater Archaeology, investigated a mid-to-late 19th century wooden-hulled centerboard schooner.  This site, while integral to instructing students on the various methodologies and techniques utilized to conduct archaeological investigations underwater, provides a glimpse into the Gulf of Mexico’s maritime history and culture.  To date, the shipwreck...


The 7,000 Foot Wreck – An Archaeological Investigation of a Historic Shipwreck Discovered in the Gulf of Mexico (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Westrick.

The 7,000 Foot Wreck is the remains of a historic sailing vessel lost in the Gulf of Mexico.  The site lies at a depth of 7,450 feet (2,271 meters) and represents one of the deepest historic shipwrecks investigated in the GOM to date.  The wreck was originally discovered during an oil and gas exploration deep tow survey in 1986.  In September 2009 the first ROV investigation of the 7,000 Foot Wreck was conducted as part of the Lophelia II: Rigs, Reefs, and Wrecks Study.  Over a roughly 15½-hour...


Anona: Historical and Archaeological Evidence of Re-Purposing of an Early 20th Century Steam Yacht. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Westrick. Daniel Warren. Robert Church.

In 1904, an elegant state-of-the-art steam yacht, Anona, rolled off the ways at George Lawley’s Massachusetts shipyard.  Built for entrepreneur and adventurer Paul J. Rainey, Anona reflected the richness and flamboyance of the pre-World War I era.  Sold to Theodore Buhl in 1907, Anona remained a symbol of the extravagance and privilege of the period.  After Buhl’s death, Anona began a 40-year transition that would change it from a luxury yacht of a rich industrialist to a produce freighter...


Civil War On The Rio Grande: Examples Of Blockade-Runners From Vera Cruz To Galveston (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Samantha Bernard.

Blockade-running is neither considered an honorable enterprise nor a villainous practice, it is simply a means of trade during times of war and its occurrence during the American Civil War was no different. As the war divided our country, blockade-runners kept the borders busy with commerce. The North and South, though separated by political agendas, continued to need each other for economic survival and foreign powers were more than willing to assist in these proceedings. Blockade-running...


Copper-Clad Ghost: The "Monterrey A Shipwreck" (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only James Delgado. Jack Irion. Frank Cantelas. Frederick Hanselmann. Christopher Horrell. Amy Borgens. Susan Langley. Michael Brennan.

Archaeological assessment and limited test excavation of the Monterrey A shipwreck provides an initial characterization of an early 19th century armed vessel whose remains are comprised of articulated two-dimensional features as well as a substantial portion of seemingly well-preserved three dimensional hull remains of the copper-sheathed hull.  The form and lines of the hull are present, and with the various features, suggest that this armed vessel of approximately 200 tons was a two-masted...


Deepwater Shipwrecks and Oil Spill Impacts: A Multidisciplinary Investigation of Shipwreck Impacts from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Warren. Robert Church. Robert Westrick. Melanie Damour. Leila Hamden.

The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico caused substantial perturbations within the coastal and marine environments. In 2013, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and other partners initiated a multidisciplinary study to examine the effects of the spill on deepwater shipwrecks. This poster presents an overview of the ongoing research into the microbial biodiversity and corrosion processes at wooden and metal-hulled shipwrecks within and outside the spill area. This...


From Compliance to Investigation: Research Design and Methodology of the Monterrey Shipwrecks Project (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Frederick H Hanselmann. Christopher Horrell. Amy Borgens. James Delgado. Jack Irion. Frank Cantelas. Michael L Brennan. Reuben Mills.

In 2011, three potential sites were discovered during oil and gas industry surveys approximately 320 kilometers southeast of Galveston, TX, and reported accordingly. NOAA OER’s 2012 cruise that revealed one site to be a shipwreck – Monterrey Shipwreck A – and was selected for further investigation.  A research design focusing on specific questions and targeting individual data sets was drafted in order to place the site within a larger theoretical and methodological framework as a means to...


Managing Missteps: Complications with Marine Magnetometer Surveys and Data Interpretation (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel A Haddock.

Marine magnetometer surveys are incredibly useful for identifying buried cultural resources.  Magnetometers are extremely sensitive instruments that measure anomalies within Earth’s magnetic field.  Ferrous materials often associated with man-made objects create these anomalies that archaeologists can identify to potentially find historic and prehistoric sites.  Due to the potentially small size of the magnetic readings, any complications in the survey can mask or mislead the interpreter.  Much...


Outreaching from the Gulf: Video Documentation of the Oil Spill Impacts on Deepwater Shipwrecks (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dennis I. Aig. Roshan Patel.

This paper will be written from the perspective of the ten years that passed between the 2004 Deep Gulf Wrecks study and the 2014 BOEM study of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacts on shipwrecks. What was innovative and unexpected in 2004 has now become expected in 2014. Dr. Dennis Aig, who headed the video unit in 2004, will discuss the basic protocols, now-primitive video equipment, and improvisation involved in the 2004 project to study the wrecks as examples of developing artificial...


Right Place, Right Time: Paleoindian Landscapes on the Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Amanda Evans.

Archaeologists have been conducting prehistoric archaeological research on the world’s continental shelves for the last 40 years, with a general consensus that remote sensing combined with physical sampling is the best method for identifying sites. Following the conclusion of a US federally-funded (BOEM) study in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico, two promising Paleoindian landscapes have been verified 20 and 30 miles offshore, at depths of between 16 and 32 m BSL. Remote sensing and physical...


The U.S. Naval Brig Somers: A Mexican War Shipwreck of 1846 (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Pilar Luna Erreguerena. James Delgado.

The brig Somers gained fame in the United States as the setting of a notorious mutiny in 1842 that directly inspired the writing of Herman Melville’s Billy Budd.  The vessel was subsequently lost while on blockade duty off Veracruz during the war between the United States and Mexico in 1846.  Rediscovered in 1986, the wreck was an untouched archaeological resource.  It also served as the means for a pioneering international collaboration between the two former combatants in the management and...


"When it’s steamboat time, you steam:" The Influence of 19th Century Steamships in the Gulf of Mexico (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Dave Ball. Jack Irion.

Driven by technological advances of the industrial revolution and the introduction of the steamboat in the Gulf of Mexico, the economy of the southern United States flourished. When Charles Morgan brought his first steamboat to the waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the stage was set for a commercial venture that helped transform the region. By the mid-19th century steamships served as the primary vehicle to transport agricultural products from the Mississippi River Valley to markets along the east...