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Archaeology of Chinese Woodchoppers and the Forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin: Exploring the Intersections of Extractive Industries, Transportation, and Labor

Author(s): Kelly Dixon ; Carrie E. Smith

Year: 2015

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Summary

During the late 1860s and early 1870s, Chinese "woodchoppers" lived and worked in the vast forests of the South Lake Tahoe Basin in the eastern Sierra Nevada, near Genoa, Nevada, leaving distinctive archaeological signatures wherever they worked and lived. The laborers in these isolated camps supplied Nevada’s Comstock mines with forest products, as the Comstock had already depleted its own local sources of lumber, approximately 30 miles away. This relatively well-preserved local cultural landscape of temporary work camps was part of a regional and transnational network fueled by industrial capitalism that provides a catalyst for investigating the intersections between extractive industries, transportation, labor, and the drastic nature of cultural ecological change in the American West.


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Cite this Record

Archaeology of Chinese Woodchoppers and the Forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin: Exploring the Intersections of Extractive Industries, Transportation, and Labor. Kelly Dixon, Carrie E. Smith. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Seattle, Washington. 2015 ( tDAR id: 433722)


Keywords

Temporal Keywords
19th Century


Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 551

Arizona State University The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation National Science Foundation National Endowment for the Humanities Society for American Archaeology Archaeological Institute of America