Charcoal Analysis (Other Keyword)

1-20 (20 Records)

Analysis of Charcoal From the Helb Site (39Ca208), South Dakota (1985)
DOCUMENT Citation Only L. Anthony Zalucha.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Domesticated Forests? Interpreting Agroforestry Practices from Diachronic Trends in Firewood Collection at the Classic Maya City of Naachtun (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lydie Dussol. Louise Purdue. Eva Lemonnier. Dominique Michelet. Philippe Nondédéo.

What can be drawn from anthracological data to infer long-term socio-environmental dynamics among ancient Mayas is a question that has received little attention. At Naachtun (Northern Peten, Guatemala), we studied charcoal remains from archaeological contexts in relation with pedological data to reconstruct forest resources and land management through time. Since the beginning of Naachtun's occupation at the end of the Preclassic period (≈ AD 150), domestic firewood economy seems to have been...


EXAMINATION OF CHARCOAL FROM THE BLACK MOUNTAIN FOLSOM SITE (5MN55), COLORADO (2001)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

Four charcoal samples were examined from the Black Mountain Folsom site (5MN55) near Creede, Colorado. These samples were recovered from features believed to be Folsom hearths. Charcoal was identified prior to submission for AMS radiocarbon analysis.


EXAMINATION OF DETRITAL CHARCOAL AND AMS RADIOCARBON ANALYSIS OF MATERIAL FROM PASTURE CANYON, ARIZONA (2010)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

Five samples from Pasture Canyon, Arizona, were examined to recover charcoal or other organic fragments suitable for radiocarbon analysis. These samples were recovered from two soil pits excavated in the stream bank and on the hillslope at the base of an older stabilized dune. Botanic components and detrital charcoal were identified, and potentially radiocarbon datable material was separated. A total of three charcoal samples were selected for AMS radiocarbon dating.


Exploring the Role of Fire in Tarascan Ritual Contexts of the Zacapu Basin, Michoacan, Mexico (2019)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle Elliott. Grégory Pereira.

This is an abstract from the "Journeying to the South, from Mimbres (New Mexico) to Malpaso (Zacatecas) and Beyond: Papers in Honor of Ben A. Nelson" session, at the 84th annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. Studies of ritual activities often focus on paraphernalia, architectural structures, and other aspects of performance. While these are all important features, other more subtle elements that are nevertheless crucial to these activities are often not considered in...


Final Report to National Park Service, Midwest Archeological Center, on Vegetation and Fire History at Voyageurs National Park (2000)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Albert M. Swain.

Management of the forest resources in areas such as Voyageurs National Park requires not only information regarding the present forests but also an assessment of forest composition immediately prior to European settlement, the frequency of forest disturbances prior to logging, and the changes or trends of the major forest species prior to logging. A vegetation and fire history of the pre-settlement forests and corresponding climatic interpretation should also aid the interpretation of...


IDENTIFICATION OF CHARCOAL FROM SITE 41LY52 ON THE SOUTHERN HIGH PLAINS, TEXAS (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

A total of 3 charcoal samples were submitted for wood identification from site 41LY52. This site is located on the Southern High Plains of west Texas. The charcoal samples were recovered from a pit believed to have been used for processing plant material within the last 1,000 years. Charcoal was examined to identify woods burned as fuel in the pit.


IDENTIFICATION OF CHARCOAL FROM THE AMPHITHEATER SITE, 41LU118, TEXAS (2001)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

A total of 20 charcoal samples were submitted for wood identification from the Amphitheater Site (41LU118) in Yellowhouse Canyon, Lubbock, Texas. The site is geologically stratified, and samples were recovered from the uppermost two strata, which cover a time span from about 5,000 to 1,000 years ago. Charcoal samples were identified to determine types of wood burned as fuel at this site.


IDENTIFICATION OF CHARCOAL FROM THE NORTH CREEK SHELTER, SITE 42GA5863, IN THE ESCALANTE VALLEY, UTAH (2005)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

Three charcoal samples were examined from the North Creek Shelter, site 42GA5863, in the Escalante Valley of south-central Utah. These samples were submitted for identification prior to radiocarbon analysis to select the best material to send for dating. The identification of specific material to be dated is particularly advantageous and allows the researcher to know precisely what material is submitted for radiocarbon dating. More accurate ages can be obtained by submitting only specific...


Importance of the Pretreatment of Wood and Charcoal Samples. In: Radiocarbon Dating (1979)
DOCUMENT Citation Only I. U. Olsson.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


MACROFLORAL ANALYSIS AND CHARCOAL IDENTIFICATION OF SEDIMENT SAMPLES FROM THE WASATCH FAULT ZONE, JUAB AND SANPETE COUNTIES, UTAH (2018)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Peter Kováčik.

The Skinner Peaks South and Hells Kitchen South trench sites are situated across the Wasatch fault in Juab and Sanpete Counties, Utah. Both sites are located above the Lake Bonneville highstand elevation (Adam Hiscock, personal communication January 29, 2018). Two charcoal and 13 bulk soil samples were submitted for macrofloral analysis to recover and identify charcoal and charred botanic remains suitable for radiocarbon age determination.


MACROFLORAL ANALYSIS OF HEARTH FILL FROM 5MF4973, NORTHEAST COLORADO (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Kathryn Puseman.

The fill from a basin-shaped hearth in a jeep trail at site 5MF4973 was floated to recover charred macrofloral remains. This site is believed to represent a prehistoric camp-type site and is located north of Maybell, Colorado. Macrofloral analysis is used to provide information concerning plant resources that might have been processed in the hearth and woods burned as fuel. Charcoal recovered from the hearth fill was submitted for AMS radiocarbon analysis.


ORGANIC RESIDUE (FTIR) ANALYSIS, MACROFLORAL ANALYSIS, CHARCOAL IDENTIFICATION, AND AMS RADIOCARBON AGE DETERMINATION OF SAMPLES FROM SITES 48YE304 AND 48YE380, TETON COUNTY, WYOMING (2016)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Peter Kováčik. Linda Scott Cummings.

Sites 48YE304 and 48YE380 lie in a wetland near the outlet of Yellowstone Lake and beginning of Yellowstone River in Teton County, Wyoming. One sediment, one charcoal, and one FCR sample from each site were submitted for macrofloral, charcoal, and organic residue (FTIR) analysis, respectively. In addition, one AMS radiocarbon date was requested for the charcoal sample from Site 48YE304.


POLLEN AND CHARCOAL ANALYSIS OF STRATIGRAPHIC SAMPLES FROM TAPIA ARROYO AND RIO PUERCO, NEW MEXICO (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings.

Twenty four stratigraphic samples were examined for pollen and charcoal from two arroyos in northern New Mexico. This study was designed as a pilot study to examine the possibility of sampling these locations at closer intervals to refine any paleoenvironmental interpretations deemed possible through this analysis. Pollen analysis provides a look at vegetation, while charcoal counts provide a means of assessing fire history. In addition, an archaeoclimatic model was examined to provide...


POLLEN, MACROFLORAL, CHARCOAL, AND CORN COB ANALYSIS AT SITE 42GA3128, UTAH (2001)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings. Kathryn Puseman.

Pollen, macrofloral, charcoal, and corn cob samples were examined from Deer Creek Rockshelter (42GA3128), located near Boulder, Utah. This shallow rockshelter contains Late Archaic/Formative materials. Proximity of this shelter to the Coombs site in Boulder indicates that upper levels of this rockshelter might contain Anasazi materials. Pollen, macrofloral, and charcoal analyses were undertaken to identify economic activities within the rockshelter and identify local woody plants and/or...


POLLEN, PHYTOLlTH, MACROFLORAL, AND CHARCOAL ANALYSIS OF FILL FROM A FIRE HEARTH AT FORT MANDAN, NORTH DAKOTA (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings. Kathryn Puseman.

Fill from a fire hearth at Fort Mandan in North Dakota was submitted for archaeobotanic examination. Pollen, phytolith, and macrofloral analyses were conducted to identify any foods that might have been processed in this fire hearth. In addition, charcoal was examined both from the macrofloral sample and from charcoal picked out of feature fill in the field.


POLLEN, STARCH, AND CHARCOAL ANALYSES AT SITES 48LN1301, 48LN3997, AND 48LN4114 FOR THE RUBY PIPELINE PROJECT, WYOMING (2012)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings. R.A. Varney. Kathryn Puseman.

Archaeology along the Ruby Pipeline in Lincoln County, Wyoming, has recently examined sites 48LN1301, 48LN3997, and 48LN4114. Samples from these three sites were submitted for pollen and starch analysis or charcoal identification. The pollen and starch samples represent ground stone and paired soil control samples that provide valuable information when interpreting an elusive record of processing native or wild plants. Samples from each of these sites will be discussed separately, below.


POLLEN, STARCH, PHYTOLITH, AND CHARCOAL ANALYSIS OF SAMPLES FROM SITES 26CK5986, 26CK6001, 26CK5984, 26CK1285, 26CK1138, AND 26CK1120, NEVADA (2002)
DOCUMENT Full-Text Linda Scott Cummings. Kathryn Puseman.

Thirteen sediment samples were submitted for combined pollen, starch, phytolith, and calcium oxalate analysis in an effort to identify the presence of mesquite at any of the six archaeological sites examined (26CK5986, 26CK6001, 26CK5984, 26CK1285, 26CK1138, and 26CK1120). Although all sites share the common goal of finding evidence of mesquite, the features sampled vary by site. At 26CK1120, two cleared circles were of the type that knowledgeable Native Americans indicate might have been...


Reconstructing Anthropogenic Fire Regimes Using Multi-Disciplinary Methods: Preliminary Results from the Neolithic (7,700–4,500 cal. BP) in Eastern Spain (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Grant Snitker.

Charcoal is produced by the incomplete combustion of plant tissues and is used as an indicator of prehistoric fire activity in archaeological and paleoecological contexts. For millennia, humans have played an active role in shaping fire regimes, making the quantification and analysis of paleo-charcoal important for understanding long-term, social-ecological systems. Globally, prehistoric transitions to agriculture often coincide with increases in fire frequency and changes in vegetation...


Ritual Fires and Sacred Hearths: the management of wood resources in Postclassic Tarascan Society of the Zacapu Basin, Michoacán (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle Elliott.

According to ethnohistoric sources, fire played a central role in the ritual practices of Postclassic Tarascan society. To venerate Curicaueri, the fire god and the most senior-ranking deity in the Tarascan pantheon, sacred hearths were kept perpetually burning outside temples, and the cazonci (king) was personally responsible for obtaining the impressive quantities of wood necessary for this feat. Fuel acquisition for these fires was often embedded in other ceremonial activities, such as hunts...