Piracy (Other Keyword)

1-13 (13 Records)

Blackbeard's Beads: An Analysis And Comparison of Glass Trade Beads From The Shipwreck 31CR314 (BUI0003) Queen Anne's Revenge Site Beaufort Inlet, North Carolina (2017)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Kimberly Urban.

In 1717, the French slaver La Concorde de Nantes was captured by pirates and renamed the Queen Anne’s Revenge (QAR). It is believed that the pirates removed the enslaved Africans before taking the ship. However, some scholars believe the pirates sold the slaves in North Carolina. One marker of a ships involvement in the slave trade are beads. Physical examination of beads is used to determine the date and country of manufacture and used to correlate a ships involvement in the trade. Thus far,...


Cultural Resources Evaluation of the North Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf (1977)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Coastal Environments, Inc..

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Dry Tortugas National Park Submerged Cultural Resources Assessment (1993)
DOCUMENT Citation Only David M. Brewer. Wilburn A. Cockrell. Frances E. Day. Gary E. Davis. Richard A. Gould.

This resource is a citation record only, the Center for Digital Antiquity does not have a copy of this document. The information in this record has been migrated into tDAR from the National Archaeological Database Reports Module (NADB-R) and updated. Most NADB-R records consist of a document citation and other metadata but do not have the documents themselves uploaded. If you have a digital copy of the document and would like to have it curated in tDAR, please contact us at comments@tdar.org.


Examining Golden Age Pirates as a Distinct Culture Through Artifact Patterning (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Courtney E Page.

Piracy is an illegal act and as a physical activity does not survive directly in the archaeological record, making it difficult to study pirates as a distinct maritime culture. This paper examines the use of artifact patterning to illuminate behavioral differences between pirates and other sailors during the Golden Age (ca. 1680-1730). The artifacts of two early eighteenth-century British pirate wrecks, Queen Anne’s Revenge(1718) and Whydah (1717) were categorized into five groups reflecting...


Gun Carriage Components from the Queen Anne’s Revenge: A Preliminary Review (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Stephen B Atkinson.

This research aims to tentatively identify gun carriage components from the Queen Anne’s Revenge (1718) (31CR314), based on clear context to cannon when in situ as well as definitive gun carriage hardware traits, in order to better understand the construction of the carriages present on the QAR. The identification of these potential naval gun carriage components includes cleaned hardware and concreted (observed via x-radiography) as well as possible identification of examples of rigging...


Illicit Trade and the Rise of a Capitalistic Culture in the 17th-century Potomac River Valley: An Analysis of Imported Clay Tobacco Pipes. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Lauren K. McMillan.

Scholars disagree about the impact of English mercantilist and Dutch free trade policies on the development of the 17th-century British colonies in the mid-Atlantic region and many argue that because the Dutch were rarely mentioned in the records of Virginia or Maryland after 1660 and the passage of the Navigation Acts, Dutch merchants were absence from the colonies. However, my research, which draws on a close reading of the archaeological and historic record focusing on trade patterns,...


Mariners' Maladies: Examining Medical Equipage From The Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck (2015)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Linda F. Carnes-McNaughton.

Treating the sick and injured of a sea-bound community on shipboard was challenging in the best of times. Chronic and periodic illnesses, wounds, amputations, toothaches, burns and other indescribable maladies of the crew, captain, and enslaved cargo had to be treated. Evidence of the tools used to heal the sick and wounded has been recovered from shipwreck 31CR314, identified as Blackbeard's Queen Anne's Revenge (formerly La Concorde, a French slaver). Excavations by NC Department of Cultural...


Pirates and Prostitutes - Seeking the invisible: Identifying the cultural footprint for illicit activity in early 17th-century Ireland (2013)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Connie Kelleher.

The North Atlantic headquarters of the ‘Confederacy of Deep-Sea Pirates’ was located along the southwest coast of Ireland. Here pirates lived and traded with native Irish, government officials and English settlers under the Munster Plantation. Many of the pirates’ families lived locally and ran legitimate businesses ashore. Prostitutes also operated within this remote landscape where the lines between legal and illicit were constantly blurred. Contemporary historical documents inform on these...


Pirates, Pepper and Prostitutes – illicit trade in goods and pleasure in 17th-century West Cork. (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Connie Kelleher.

The southern coast of Ireland in the early-17th century enjoyed a booming trade in exotic goods like pepper, cinnamon and other spices. This was underscored by an even brisker trade in pleasures of the flesh where the women in the pirates’ lives ran successful businesses of their own, providing safe houses, taverns, inns and brothels that tapped into the business of plunder. This was a time and place when illicit activity was the norm, when ships bringing plundered goods operated openly and...


Plundering the Spanish Main: Henry Morgan’s Raid on Panama (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Tomas Mendizabal. Frederick H Hanselmann. Juan Martin.

Sorting through myth and popular perception in order arrive at truth and historical veracity is one of the most intriguing aspects of historical archaeology.  Featured in a variety of media, and, of course, the iconic rum, Henry Morgan lives on in modern popular culture.  Yet through the little historical documentation and archaeological evidence that exists, much can be learned about his exploits that led to the creation of his fame and legend.  The Spanish Main, or the continental Spanish...


A Preliminary Analysis of Lead Sheathing and Waterproofing Evidence from Queen Anne's Revenge (1718) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeremy Borrelli.

Throughout history, ocean-going watercraft have been the primary vehicle for global trade, colonization and exploration. Constant wear on ship’s hulls over time, coupled with damage from marine fouling organisms prompted sailors and shipwrights to develop a diverse range of methods and materials to protect their vessels from harm. Nautical sheathing refers to the exterior covering of a ship’s hull with a thin layer of metal or wood to protect the vessel from marine life fouling, and to stabilize...


The Wreck of the Quedagh Merchant: Identification and Affiliation of Captain Kidd’s Lost Ship (2016)
DOCUMENT Citation Only Frederick H Hanselmann. Charles D Beeker.

The shipwreck of the Quedagh Merchant is an archaeological site that brings to life one of the most romanticized activities in modern popular culture: piracy.  Little specific evidence of pirates and their actions exists in the archaeological record and, oftentimes, it is difficult to distinguish the identification and function of certain artifacts and features from being piratical or simply commonplace.  In fact, finding a site and making the connection to piracy can often be a difficult...


"Yes, Sir. All Was in Arms:" An Account of the Small Arms Discovered on the Wreck of Queen Anne’s Revenge (1718) (2018)
DOCUMENT Citation Only J Myron Rolston. Kimberly P Kenyon. Teresa E Williams.

Until recently, weapons from Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge (31CR314) were primarily represented by large artillery: the ubiquitous twenty-nine cast iron cannon found on the wreck to date. The only trace of small firearms has consisted of isolated gunlocks, flints, and the occasional copper alloy fittings, such as side plates, trigger guards, and a lone musketoon barrel. X-radiography, however, has now revealed additional evidence. Five articulated small arms and additional disarticulated...