A Preliminary Analysis of Lead Sheathing and Waterproofing Evidence from Queen Anne's Revenge (1718)

Author(s): Jeremy Borrelli

Year: 2018

Summary

Throughout history, ocean-going watercraft have been the primary vehicle for global trade, colonization and exploration. Constant wear on ship’s hulls over time, coupled with damage from marine fouling organisms prompted sailors and shipwrights to develop a diverse range of methods and materials to protect their vessels from harm. Nautical sheathing refers to the exterior covering of a ship’s hull with a thin layer of metal or wood to protect the vessel from marine life fouling, and to stabilize and protect surface material applied for that purpose. Excavation of North Carolina shipwreck 31CR314, Queen Anne’s Revenge, has resulted in an assemblage of sheet lead artifacts that suggest the utilization of lead sheathing in addition to wooden sacrificial hull planking. This poster will outline the lead sheathing evidence recovered to date and discuss the various types in relation to prevailing trends in hull sheathing through the 18th century.

Cite this Record

A Preliminary Analysis of Lead Sheathing and Waterproofing Evidence from Queen Anne's Revenge (1718). Jeremy Borrelli. Presented at Society for Historical Archaeology, Albuquerque, NM. 2018 ( tDAR id: 441682)

This Resource is Part of the Following Collections

Keywords

Temporal Keywords
18th Century

Spatial Coverage

min long: -129.199; min lat: 24.495 ; max long: -66.973; max lat: 49.359 ;

Record Identifiers

PaperId(s): 151