Society for Historical Archaeology 2018

Part of: Society for Historical Archaeology

This collection contains the abstracts from the 2018 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archaeology, held in New Orleans, Louisiana, January 3–7, 2018. Most files in this collection contain the abstract only.

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Documents
  • 1607 to 1619: An Examination of Change over Time at James Fort (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Danny W. Schmidt. Lisa E. Fischer.

    Within the first few weeks of landing on Jamestown Island in the spring of 1607 the colonists set about constructing a triangular palisaded fort. At first tents served to house the colonists, and to shelter their place of worship. Slowly but surely with the first public buildings, the storehouse and the church, more permanent structures began to rise. The interior of the fort would see many changes during these years, both reflected in the documentary record as well as the archaeological record....

  • 19th Century Clay Pipes from Jacksonport State Park, Arkansas (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only C. Andrew Buchner. Karla M. Oesch.

    Excavations at the Jacksonport State Park over the 2014 to 2015 field season have produced over 65,000 artifacts. This material has providing information about the lives of Jacksonport's residents from its prominence and period of historical significance (1852-1892) and on to the subsequent poor house era (1910-1953). Within this extensive collection are several campaign/ president pipes imported from Germany from circa 1830 to circa 1870. The identifiable specimens include presidential...

  • 19th Century Entertainments From A Small Plantation In Alexandria, Virginia: Archaeology At Shuter’s Hill (44AX175) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Terilee Edwards-Hewitt.

    The archaeology of childhood is underrepresented in the archaeological literature. Identifying children’s toys can be complex since many recreational objects, such as Frozen Charlottes, dominos, marbles, harmonicas and mouth harps, were used by both children and adults. Other toys found at this archaeological site are solely associated with children, primarily metal military figures and dolls. Shuter’s Hill, located in Alexandria, Virginia, was a small plantation located near Washington, D.C....

  • 19th Century Reform and Control at the Industrial School for Girls in Dorchester, Massachusetts (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only maddie penney.

    An examination of the nineteenth century adornment assemblage from the Industrial School for Girls in Dorchester, Massachusetts, archaeologically excavated by Joseph Bagley and the Boston City Archaeology Lab during the summer of 2015. The school was staffed and administered by middle and upper-class Boston influenced by a Second Great Awakening reform movement, in which piety was the foundation for a number of reform efforts, including femininity, domesticity, and spiritual materialism. The...

  • 21st Century Commemoration and the Landscapes of an Absent Past: Remembering with Places in Santa Rosa, CA (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Margaret Purser.

    Located in an overwhelmingly Democratic county, Santa Rosa's neighborhoods returned decidedly mixed results in the 2016 presidential race. Ensuing public discourse has invoked long-standing rhetoric about who "really belongs" in the community of immigrants, based on arrival time. But unlike Confederate monuments in the South, Santa Rosa’s historical narrative is less openly contested in its commemorative sites and monuments than it is essentially absent altogether. This historically silent...

  • 3D Learning at Kingsley Plantation and the St. Augustine Lighthouse: Incorporating 3D Technology Into FPAN Public Archaeology Outreach (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kevin A Gidusko. Sarah Miller.

    An important aspect of public archaeology efforts is the need to utilize new, innovative methods to engage a changing public. The use of 3D modeling and printing technology currently offers a novel approach to improve extant methods of public interaction. This paper discusses FPAN’s efforts to incorporate 3D technology into public outreach, especially via inclusion into curricula already in use by the network. "Investigating a Tabby Slave Cabin" and "Investigating a Light Station," part of...

  • 97 Acres, Deep Cisterns and a Pit Filled with Over 2,000 Beer Bottles: Challenges in Urban Archaeology Through the Investigation of the NGA West Site (23SL2393) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Meredith M Hawkins Trautt.

    The new National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) will be constructed on 97 acres within a former working-class neighborhood in North St. Louis. It was clear from the beginning, for various reasons, that a traditional cultural resource study was not feasible. This presentation will outline the methodological approaches that led to the identification and mitigation of the NGA West Site (23SL2393), the challenges encountered during the laboratory analysis, and ongoing research questions in...

  • Abolition and the Rise of the Aku: Creating Ethnicity through Colonial Policy on the Gambia River (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Liza Gijanto.

    The Gambian capital of Banjul was founded as part of British abolition efforts in West Africa.  A planned urban center, its earliest residents included the Aku, or Liberated Africans resettled from Sierra Leone and captured slave vessels.  The Aku identity formed over several decades in The Gambia largely through self-identification as the ‘other’ African and British subjects in the 19th century.  In the early 20th century they were the Gambian elite and became the driving force behind the...

  • Above and Below Ground: Teaching Combined Methodologies for a Holistic Understanding of the Built Environment (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kyla Cools. Katherine Boyle.

    During the summer of 2017, the University of Maryland’s Anthracite Heritage Program held a combined historic preservation and archaeological field school at Eckley Miners’ Village in Northeastern Pennsylvania. Complementing the University’s dual masters in applied anthropology and historic preservation, this field school emphasized the value of utilizing historic preservation and archaeology to inform one another. This field school has provided an invaluable opportunity for students to learn the...

  • Advances In Laboratory and Field Use Of Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (pXRF) and LASAR ABLATION-ICPMS (LA-ICP-MS) Technologies In Field Archaeological And Combined Survey Format (CSF) Surveys (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Richard J Lundin.

    Major advances in the Laboratory and Field Use of Portable X-Rarchaeologyay Fluorescence (pXRF) and the newly developed LASAR ABLATION ICP-MS (ICP-MS) in archaeology are enabling investigators to gain new insights into the elemental and chemical content of laboratory and field samples of artifact, soil and plant materials.  Many of these advances have come directly from laboratory studies and field geochemical investigations initiatiated by mineral industry and governmental organizations and...

  • Afro-Brazilian Spaces of Worship: Late Nineteenth Century Archaeological Findings from Salvador, Bahia (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Samuel L. Gordenstein.

    This paper discusses the transformation of domestic living quarters into spaces of Afro-religious worship in Salvador, Brazil, during the late nineteenth century. This is accomplished through the presentation of historical sources that demonstrate the pervasiveness of this phenomenon, and especially, analysis of spatial and artifactual data unearthed during archaeological excavations in a house basement. The study uses historical, ethnohistorical and ethnographic analogies with present day...

  • After the Gear is Gone: Perspectives from the Digital Index of North American Archaeology on How Archaeologists Implement Digital Instances of Past Peoples and Scientific Concepts (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kelsey Noack Myers. Robert DeMuth. Joshua J Wells. David Anderson. Eric Kansa. Stephen Yerka. Sarah W. Kansa. Alex Badillo. Molly Mesner.

    Archaeologists today engage with digital records of primary data, derivative interpretive information, and ontological descriptors used to represent intellectual models of individual research, and instantiations of theoretical constructs from the local to the landscape. Prior to and into the digital age, the archaeological record writ large as a testable and defensible set of hypotheses and factual statements is constructed from a melange of meaningful information expected to correlate with...

  • Agricultural Practices in the Upper Casamance Region, Senegal, 7th-19th Centuries AD: Archaeobotanical Results from Payoungou and Korop (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Leah A. Stricker.

    As a result of more than 60 years of archaeobotanical research, West Africa is recognized as an important independent centre of crop domestication, and archaeobotany has shed light on the connection between the crops and foodways of West Africa and those of the American south. But much remains unknown of the history of timing and processes of West African crop domestication, and food production and processing within this ethnically and environmentally diverse region. Formerly part of the greater...

  • The Alamo Underground: Recent Excavations at Mission San Antonio de Valero (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Nesta J. Anderson.

    Recent excavations at the Mission San Antonio de Valero (the Alamo) revealed that in the midst of the highly developed urban landscape of San Antonio, pockets of archaeological deposits remain nestled between utilities, streets, and beautification improvements. Excavations at the west and south wall complexes revealed evidence of architectural features and three centuries of refuse left behind by San Antonio's residents as they reinvented the physical landscape. The diversity of material culture...

  • "All the Usual Improvements": Rediscovering the Plantation Landscape at James Monroe’s Highland (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kyle W. Edwards.

    Unlike other Presidential plantations, archaeological research at Highland has been relatively limited. This, combined with a complex occupational history and sparse documentary records, has provided little evidence of the plantation landscape constructed by Monroe in 1799 or clues to how that landscape was reshaped by subsequent owners. However, spurred by the recent discovery of the original plantation house, ongoing archaeological survey is providing new insights into landscape organization...

  • America’s ‘Haven of Health’: Health and Recreation at Turn of the Century Excelsior Springs, Missouri (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel E. Pierce. Anthony Farace.

    Once known as America’s "Haven of Health", the city of Excelsior Springs, Missouri was home to an estimated 40 unique mineral spring and well sites.  This collection of mineral waters is one of the largest in the world, and reputation quickly spread of their healing properties.  After the founding of the city in 1880, hundreds and thousands flocked to the area daily to enjoy the various health spas and recreational facilities.  Preliminary analysis of artifacts recovered at the Regent Spring...

  • Analysis Of Artefacts From The Portuguese Nau Esmeralda (1503) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Parham. David L Mearns.

    Following the recent discovery and identification of the wreck site of two Portuguese naus from Vasco da Gama’s second voyage to India lost in 1503 off the coast of Al Hallaniyah Island, Oman, a series of scientific analyses were conducted to better understand the origin, manufacture and use of certain types of the recovered artefacts.  The artefacts studied include stone shot, composite lead/iron shot, breech powder chambers, coins and a rare copper-alloy disc that has the appearance of an...

  • Analysis of Québec shipwrecks: the necessity of integrating local divers to improve the management of maritime heritage (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Carolane Veilleux.

    The province of Québec, Canada, has witnessed thousands of wrecks throughout its history. Despite this fact, the number of shipwrecks discovered remains very low. In 2009, 49 sites had been located in the province; in 2017, the total had hardly reached 80 wrecks. A great cultural potential is lying under the vast hydrographic system of Québec, but the maritime archaeologists have limited financial resources and few trained workers, not to mention the short field seasons. This brings up the topic...

  • Analysis Of The Building Floor Of A French Colonial Structure In St. Charles, Missouri (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra C Snyder. Steve Dasovich.

    This paper describes the analysis of an in situ dirt floor from a French Colonial structure in St. Charles, Missouri.  The floor is a prepared floor, constructed of homogenous soil brought from off-site and is similar in thickness throughout.  The only identified wall of the structure is poteaux sur sole.  In and above the floor, the structure also contained a double-firepit hearth.  Artifacts types within the floor are varied, but include several chronological markers indicating French...

  • An Analysis of the Reasons behind the Increase in Speed of Dutch and British Ships, 1750-1830 (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Patricia H Schwindinger.

    Previous studies indicate that there is a general increase in ship speed for both British and Dutch wooden sailing vessels during the time period 1750-1830. Using logbooks digitized by the Climatological Database of the World’s Oceans project (CLIWOC), this study seeks to identify the reasons behind this increase. The introduction of copper plating in the late 1700s had a significant effect on the speed of British ships, but historical documents reveal that copper plating was less frequently...

  • Analysis of Unidentified Ceramics in Historic Saint Charles, Missouri (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Gwyneth J Vollman.

    An excavation behind a bed and breakfast located on Main Street in historic downtown Saint Charles, Missouri unearthed several large, unidentified sherds of ceramics. The focus of this research is to use comparative collections, ceramic identification guides, public records, the Saint Charles County Historic Society archives, and any other necessary means of research to identify the ceramics, their possible use, and who they might have been used by. 

  • An Anchor in the Mesa Top: Reexamining Who Settled the West (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jeremy C Brunette.

    The popular narrative of the settling of the western United States during the homestead era revolves around the idea of rugged individuals dispersing across the landscape, and making "improvements" that developed into settlements. As this poster will illustrate, this narrative does not apply to all who homesteaded the west. In the early twentieth century an individual with an intellectual disability purchased a homestead on the Parajito Plateau in Northern New Mexico. During World War II this...

  • The Angela Site (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David Givens.

    2019 marks the 400th anniversary of the first representative government in the New World and the arrival of first Africans to the emerging colony. To mark this poignant moment in history, the Jamestown Rediscovery team in partnership with the National Park Service began excavations at the site of one of the first Africans in English North America.  Arriving on the Treasurer in 1619, one of these first Africans, "Angela" is listed as living with prominent planter and merchant Captain William...

  • Anglo-American Ceramics As Social Medium (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Hunter.

    Long before the age of Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, household ceramics have been enlisted to carry messages of religious inspiration, political engagement, historical commemoration, social mores, and personal sentiments. With the advent of mass production, these messages could quickly appear on tea tables, in dinning rooms, and tavern barrooms throughout the Anglo-American world. This beautifully illustrated will review some of the most significant ceramic campaigns in America's historic...

  • Anglo-Native Interaction in Virginia’s Potomac River Valley (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only D. Brad Hatch.

    Trade played a crucial role in the relationships that formed between European colonists and Native Americans during the early colonial period. In the 17th-century Potomac River Valley the interactions between Natives and Europeans laid the foundations for the emergence of a truly creolized society. This paper examines the influence of Native Americans on the early settlement of Virginia's Potomac Valley from 1647-1666 using the Hallowes site (44WM6) as an example. Analyses of the faunal remains,...

  • Another Brick in the Wall: A Pedagogical Approach to Excavations at a 19th -century Brickyard (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily E Dietrich.

    Incorporating archaeology within the high school curricula fosters an interest in archaeology and site preservation. The Milton High School Archaeology Project provides students the opportunity to experience and participate in archaeological research. At a 19th-century brickyard, students learn anthropology and their local history through hands-on excavations. Through the use of Project Based Learning (PBL) students conduct archaeological and historical research, and present their work in the...

  • Antioch Colony and the Archaeology of Texas Freedmen Descendants (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Maria Franklin.

    In the aftermath of the Civil War, a small group of black families founded Antioch Colony in rural Hays County, TX. This enclave of kin-related households rapidly became a beacon for other emancipated blacks who were drawn to the colony’s church and school. The settlement’s growth and stability hinged upon the success of farming households to work together, stay out of debt, and retain their hard-earned land. Archaeological and oral history research focused on the descendants of these pioneering...

  • The Apotheosis of Nate Harrison (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jaime Lennox. Seth Mallios.

    Historical accounts of famed San Diego pioneer Nate Harrison (ca. 1833-1920), a former enslaved African-American from the antebellum South, underwent meaningful transformations during the 20th century.  Secondary narratives of the region’s first African-American homesteader grew into some of the county’s most popular and exotic legends.  Local authors repeatedly altered specific details of Harrison’s emancipation, longevity, living quarters, and other related biographical phenomena, resulting in...

  • Applications of LiDAR Imagery at the Beech Grove Confederate Camp, Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Mabelitini. Carl R. Shields.

    Before any archaeology was conducted at Beech Grove, aerial LiDAR data was acquired, to map known Confederate earthworks, identify earthworks that were not previously known, and otherwise guide the archaeological investigations.  The data sets consisted of 22 LiDAR point cloud LAS swath files which produced high accuracy 3D Digital Elevation Model (DEM) with 1.0 foot cell size. The LiDAR data helped identify at least three Civil War fortification features in the northern and eastern portions of...

  • Aquinnah Past To Present (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Holly Herbster. Jane Miller.

    The nineteenth century history of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head/Aquinnah is a snapshot of continuous Native American presence on Martha’s Vineyard over thousands of years. Residents were placed under state guardians in 1781. Between 1863 and 1878, communal lands were subdivided and distributed among tribal families, and a census of tribal members and professional survey of existing homesteads was completed. Aquinnah ceased to be an Indian reservation with town incorporation in 1870,...

  • [AR]chaeology of El Presidio de San Francisco: Augmented Reality as a Public Interpretation Tool (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kari Lentz. Blake Vollmer. Diego Rocha. Claire Yancey. Edward DeHaro. Kari Jones. Liz Melicker.

    Archaeologists have often eschewed technology as too expensive or superfluous for public outreach efforts. How can we as professionals overcome these long-held ideas and start to bring our projects into the digital age? This paper attempts to answer this question by examining how affordable cutting-edge technology can enhance public interpretation of archaeological resources. Augmented reality and 3D modeling were used in conjunction to visualize long-gone historical structures within the modern...

  • Archaeological And Archival Investigations Of A Norwegian Farmstead In Bosque County, Texas (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra M Smith.

    Bosque County, Texas, has a rich history as the most successful Norwegian settlement in the state, attracting immigrants throughout the latter half of the 19th century. Ole Finstad was no exception to this Texas fever; immigrating in 1871 at the age of 51, he acquired 160 acres in Bosque County, built a rock house, and spent his days farming and raising cattle. His descendants continued this tradition for the next 84 years, and the ruins of the original rock house still stand today. This paper...

  • An Archaeological Examination of the Human Remains associated with Vasa (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Allison N Miller Simonds.

    When Vasa sank in 1628, approximately 30 lives were lost. Through the course of the excavation of the ship in the 1950s and 1960s, over 1,500 human bones were recorded and cataloged, which are currently believed to represent 15 individuals. The human remains have been the subject of osteological, odontological, and DNA analyses, though none of these studies have taken into account their archaeological context. This research provides the first complete archaeological analysis of the human remains...

  • Archaeological Excavations in Monticello's First Kitchen (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Crystal L. Ptacek. Beatrix Arendt. Craig Kelley. Lauren Gryctko.

    In 1808, enslaved African American laborers at Monticello dumped about 1,000 cubic feet of dirt to raise the floor to convert the Kitchen into a Wash House in preparation for Thomas Jefferson's retirement years. For the previous forty years, this Kitchen had been the space in which fine cuisine was prepared for Jefferson, his family, and guests. Archaeologists recently excavated nearly a third of this deposit, reidentifying the stew stoves, the original brick floor, and fireplace. Analysis of...

  • Archaeological Impacts on Collective Memory: Re-creating a Mayan Identity? (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kasey Diserens Morgan.

    If collective memory "requires the support of a group delimited in space and time," (Halbwachs 1992) how does archaeological work engaging local communities impact the memory of historical events? As scholars interested in the indigenous rebellion known as the Caste War (1847-1901) in Tihosuco, Mexico, we are often told by members of the local community who repopulated the area eighty years ago that we know more about the history of the uprising than they do. This paper seeks to explore three...

  • Archaeological Investigation of North-Eastern English Responses to the Great Depression (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ronan O'Donnell.

    This paper presents preliminary results of the  Landscapes of the Great Depression Project. Both government agencies and private individuals created schemes to create employment or ameliorate the effects of unemployment during the Great Depression and earlier de-industrialisation. Research is being conducted into four such schemes: two private and two public. All were concerned with material features of industrial society, poverty or unemployment and utilised landscape and material culture to...

  • An Archaeological Investigation Of The Submarine Resurgam (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only William Garrett. Peter Holt.

    The early steam powered submarine Resurgam was designed and built by an eccentric curate from Manchester, England, and was lost in mysterious circumstances off North Wales in 1880.  The submarine was relocated in 1995 and was investigated in 1997 by a mixed team of avocational and professional divers, archaeologists and conservators during the SubMap project.  A summary of the results of this and later investigations is presented along with a new analysis of the Resurgam submarine's...

  • Archaeological Perspectives on American White Supremacist Appropriations of Viking Heritage (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Craig N. Cipolla.

    This paper explores American conservatism using the lens of contemporary archaeology to rethink connections between the rise of the alt-right (white supremacy) and the appropriation and fabrication of Norse heritage in North America. Recently emphasized by white supremacist and Seattle murderer, Jeremy Christian’s use of the phrase "Hail Vinland," Viking imaginaries play an important role in certain white supremacist narratives. I approach these narratives as heterogeneous assemblages of people,...

  • Archaeological Survey of Tennessee's Rosenwald Schools (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Benjamin C. Nance. Sarah Levithol Eckhardt.

    The Tennessee Division of Archaeology completed an archaeological site survey of Tennessee’s Rosenwald Schools in 2017.  These schools for African-American students were built between 1912 and 1932 and partly funded by the Julius Rosenwald Fund. This program helped construct 354 schools, 9 teachers’ homes, and 10 industrial shops in Tennessee. Researchers were able to locate most of these sites, assess their archaeological integrity, and add them to the statewide archaeological database...

  • Archaeologies of Disinvestment and Displacement: Documenting Detroit’s Foreclosure Crisis (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kaeleigh Herstad.

    The City of Detroit boasts "the largest and most transparent" demolition program in the US, having demolished approximately 12,000 structures in under 3 years. While the city is best known for its decaying industrial sites, the majority of Detroit’s vacant structures are residential: recently occupied homes, schools, churches, and businesses.This presentation focuses on the production and destruction of these more ordinary ‘ruins,’ examining the political and historical processes that create...

  • Archaeologies of Foodways through Butchery at Manzanar National Historic Site (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Caity M Bishop.

    In reaction to the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor by Imperial Japan, Americans of Japanese descent were forcibly relocated to internment camps. Internment camps created an environment where Americans constantly had to prove their loyalty to not only white Americans, but also to fellow Japanese Americans. This dynamic challenged Japanese Americans to choose a cultural affiliation, American or Japanese, which denied who they really were as Japanese Americans. Research into the food ways of interned...

  • Archaeology and Dissonant Memories of Japanese American Incarceration (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Koji H. Ozawa.

    Memories of the Japanese American Incarceration Camps during WWII vary widely across America. For some, memories of the incarceration are a focal point of their identity and a driver of political action. Others who underwent this imprisonment chose not to recall their experiences. The incarceration can haunt their descendants as an ever-present but silenced past. Broadly, the United States’ relationship to this past is fractured. Activists invoke the incarceration as an affront to American...

  • Archaeology and Interpretation at The Hermitage (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Marsha A. Mullin.

    Archaeology has contributed to interpretation at The Hermitage in a variety of ways but two benefits particularly stand out: First, by increasing our knowledge about Andrew Jackson’s enslaved workers and their built environment, topics with very few written records.  This has allowed us to interpret a large part of the historic site and more aspects of the plantation where previously, the Hermitage mansion dominated the interpretation program.  Secondly, the archaeology program gave us the tools...

  • An Archaeology of (Un)Capital: Hobos, The Great Depression, and a Small Pennsylvania Slate Quarrying Town Called Delta (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Daniel Sayers. Justin E. Uehlein.

    Capitalism has always relied on the exploitation of temporary, underpaid laborers. This fact of Capital has never been more clear than during the Great Depression. When faced with joblessness and the loss of their homes, countless persons took to the rails in search of work. These persons found short-term homes in camps near labor centers across the country. Drawing on archaeological, archival, and ethnographic data on a transient laborer camp near Delta, Pennsylvania, we explore the potential...

  • The Archaeology of Asymmetric Warfare in the U.S. Dakota War of 1862, Woodlake Battlefield Minnesota (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sigrid Arnott. David Maki.

    Investigation of the patterns of asymmetric warfare at the Wood Lake Battlefield, the location of the last armed conflict between the Oceti Sakowin and the U.S. Military, revealed evidence of tactics used in asymmetric warfare in 1862 Minnesota. Conflict archaeology provides a new way of understanding the complexity of the cultural conflict as it played out in battle. Dakota traditional warfare, which relied on knowledge of the landscape and avoided loss of life, was adapted to fight against the...

  • Archaeology of Excursion Steamboats: Recent Work on Late 19th Century Shipwrecks of the Midwest (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Mark Schwartz. Mark Gleason. Mary Dersch. Brian Abbott. Mark W Holley.

    Shipwrecks in inland lakes in the United States provide scholars with an opportunity to study the nautical archiotecture and technological design of early excursion steamboats. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, inland lakes were important areas for resort communities, and leisure destinations for urban centers. An important aspect of these spots were steamboats designed exclusively for pleasure excusrions. Recent sonar imaging of the shipwreck Hazel A. in Reeds Lake, Michigan has...

  • An Archaeology of Inventories: An 18th Century Jesuit Winery and Distillery in Nasca, Peru (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brendan J. M. Weaver.

    Estate inventories offer archaeologists a synchronic assemblage of material culture including the built environment, and an opportunity to understand how aspects of such an assemblage relate to one another and the landscape from the perspective of the assessor. Two such inventories exist for the Hacienda La Ventilla, an annex of the Hacienda San Joseph de La Nasca owned by the Cuzco Jesuits. The first dates to the sale of La Ventilla by a lay proprietor in 1706 and lists the structures,...

  • An Archaeology of Survivance: Investigating Settler Colonial Narratives with the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde Community of Oregon (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Sara L Gonzalez.

    Native nations in the 19th and early 20th century were subjected to increasing pressure from American settlers and the U.S. government, which resulted in their forced removal, resettlement, and the creation of policies that were directed at terminating tribal identities and reservations. Despite this history of colonial oppression and dispossession tribes such as the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon (CTGR) did not just survive settler colonialism, but created anew their social worlds and sense of...

  • Archaeology of the 1859 Dorchester Industrial School for Girls: an Introduction (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph M. Bagley. Sarah Johnson. maddie penney.

    In 2015, the City of Boston Archaeology Program excavated the rear yard of the 1859 Industrial School for Girls in Boston ahead of construction on the property.  The School was founded by wealthy Boston women in order to recive neglected children and provide them education and domestic labor training with an ultimate goal of employment as domestic laborers in Boston-area homes.  The more than 17,000 artifacts recovered, most from an intact 5-meter long privy and nearby trash deposit, are...

  • Archaeology of the American Southwest: Comparing the Mythology of the Frontier with Daily Life in Fort Davis, Texas (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Alexandra D Walton.

    The mythology of the frontier has captured the imaginations of generations of Americans. Images of cowboys, ranchers, and gold miners have become the idealized subjects of wild west shows, dime novels, paintings, and films.  Even today, the legends of Buffalo Bill, Jesse James, and Calamity Jane are still widely known.  In an attempt to examine how these romantic myths have shaped the lives of those living in the Southwest, this poster presentation will analyze 20th century cultural material...

  • Archaeology on Rogers Island in the Hudson River (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only David R. Starbuck.

    In the summer of 2017, field work resumed on Rogers Island for the first time in 19 years.  Covered with barracks buildings, huts, tents and hospitals, Rogers Island was the centerpiece of a 16,000-man British military encampment during the French & Indian War.  The current phase of archaeology conducted by SUNY Adirondack and Plymouth State University will assist in the development of walking trails on the island.

  • Archaeology on the World's Oldest Wooden Tugboat: Documenting and Restoring M/V Arthur Foss (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Saxon T Bisbee. Nathaniel F Howe.

    Northwest Seaport Maritime Heritage Center in Seattle is one of the oldest maritime heritage organizations in the US, and its fleet flagship is also one of the oldest of its kind. The historic wooden tugboat Arthur Foss (1889) represents Pacific Northwest wooden shipbuilding at its height, and a long tradition of maritime commerce on the Pacific coast. This vessel, while technically operational, has never had a major restoration or significant documentation of its construction features. No...

  • Archaeology over the Edge: Recent Work on the Hanging Flume in Western Colorado (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Michael J. Prouty.

    In the spring of 2017, Alpine Archaeological Consultants, Inc. (Alpine) completed an inventory and site testing of the Hanging Flume and associated sites in western Montrose County, Colorado.  The Hanging Flume was a 10-mi.-long bracket flume that was suspended along the cliff walls above the San Miguel and Dolores river canyons.  It was constructed between 1889 and 1891 by the Montrose Placer Mining Company in association with a hydraulic gold placer mining operation along the banks of the...

  • Archaeozoological studies of the Maritime Archaeology of the Port of Acapulco Project: Taphonomic and taxonomic analysis on faunal remains from San Diego Fort (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Salvador I. Estrada.

    The history of the Fort of San Diego in the Port of Acapulco de Juárez as a key defensive building, intended to protect the Asian valuable goods brought by the Manila Galleon, has been barely studied. Recently a garbage dump was located along the external wall of the fortification with an important quantity and variety of materials of remarkable archaeological and historical value. One of the studies that are being carried out is that concerning with the daily life of the population settled in...

  • An archeology of segregation after the unification of Methodism in Washington, D.C. (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Matthew Palus.

    Emory Church in Northwest Washington, D.C. hosts a Pan-African Methodist congregation, but historically Emory Church was aligned with Southern Methodism, and had a segregated White congregation until the beginning of the 1960s. Soon after the integration of the church, the last White pastor departed as did the remaining White members of the congregation, leaving the church to a small community of worshipers in 1968. Archeological mitigation undertaken in 2016 as part of the redevelopment of the...

  • The Architectural Evolution of Quebec City’s Lower Town: 350 Years of Urbanization (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Reginald Auger. Allison L Bain.

    The past 25 years of collaborative archaeological research between the City of Quebec and Université Laval is an exemplary case study of combining public education, site development and academic training. We studied local urbanization during the development of New France and after the Conquest as a result of past political and economic decisions. Using the case study of our annual field school at the îlot des Palais or Intendant’s Palace site, we focus here on thematic research linked to the...

  • Architecture of Early Water Reclamation on Blackfeet Reservation (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Evelyn Pickering.

    The Blackfeet Reservation in northwestern Montana was established in 1855 and contains six river basins. Beginning in the early 1900s, plans for Blackfeet Irrigation Projects were developed. It was estimated that 111,000 acres of the 1.5 million acres reservation would be irrigable. From 1908 to 1920, the Bureau of Reclamation constructed a network of water works; including canals, laterals, reservoirs, and dams across six irrigation districts. Through the lens of materiality as manifested in...

  • Are There Any French Glass Beads In Quebec (16th and 17th Centuries)? (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only adelphine bonneau. Reginald Auger. Bernard Gratuze. Jean-François Moreau.

    Hundreds of pounds of glass beads were imported among other goods by French settlers during the historical period. Those glass beads are found on several contexts from trading posts to Jesuits houses; alone or on objects: chaplets, bracelets, cloths. Although those beads were imported by French people, were they manufactured in France? If not, where do they come from? Is there a difference between beads found in trading posts and those from French settlements (settler use)? Is it possible to...

  • Army Wives and Kids: Civilian Lives in Military Context at the Augusta Arsenal (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jennifer M Trunzo. Maggie Needham.

    Between 1826 and 1955, the Augusta Arsenal operated on the land currently occupied by the Summerville Campus of Augusta University. As a military site, it is easy to conceptualize the Arsenal as a male gendered place and associate it almost exclusively with war-related manufacturing activities. However, most of the artifacts recovered from the Arsenal directly address the domestic lives of the people who lived there. Additionally, many artifacts from the Arsenal speak to presence of the often...

  • Arrggghhh Braaaaiiiins: The Zooarchaeology of a Mid-19th Century Privy in New Orleans’ Historic French Quarter (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Helen V. Bouzon. J. Ryan Kennedy.

    In this paper we present analysis of faunal remains recovered from a mid-19th century privy at 936 St. Peter Street, an archaeological site in New Orleans’ historic French Quarter. Although the faunal assemblage includes domestic trash related to meals eaten by the site occupants, it is dominated by a tremendous number of caprine cranial elements. These cranial bones show a consistent butchery pattern indicating that site occupants were harvesting caprine brains in large numbers, presumably for...

  • Artifact Assemblage from the Converging Worlds Project (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Andrew Willard. Dorothy Rowland.

    This paper discusses the artifacts found during the 2017 summer field excavation of the Highbourne Cay Shipwreck, excluding any hull remains. The wreck is well-known and located in an area that has a low sediment level, as a result, the artifact assemblage is expected to be small. The artifacts found and being discussed will be those that were not recovered by salvagers in the 1960s, and were not in the section excavated in the 1980s. Although, there is a possibility of duplicates of previous...

  • Artifacts in the Archives: Material Culture Curated Within Milwaukee County Coroner’s Inquests (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brooke L. Drew.

    Historical archaeologists expect to encounter artifacts in the field or lab, but may not anticipate uncovering them in the library. While conducting research on individuals buried in the Milwaukee County Poor Farm Cemetery, the author came across a diverse assortment of material culture associated with the coroner’s inquests curated at the Milwaukee County Historical Society Research Library.  This paper will describe the various items uncovered including photographs, clothing samples, personal...

  • At the Crossroads: Intersections of Colonization (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Dawn M. Rutecki.

    Intersectionality arose as a strategy for understanding the ways oppression operates simultaneously on multiple aspects of a person’s identity.  As such, it provides a key framework for understanding how gender, race, and religion affected interactions between Europeans and indigenous communities from contact through today.  The missionaries of New Spain, as well as later explorers of the Louisiana Territory, proscribed gendered expectations on indigenous peoples that fundamentally altered their...

  • Atlanta's Legacy: The MARTA Collection (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lori C. Thompson. Jeffrey Glover.

    The City of Atlanta was born from Terminus, a junction of rail lines, in the nineteenth century. Archaeological excavations for a modern transportation system, Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA), were conducted in the late 1970s. The results of this massive urban archaeological project identified 40 sites, along with 29 areas of artifact concentrations. The return of the MARTA Collection to Georgia State University has revealed new insight into nineteenth and twentieth century...

  • Augmented, Hyper-mediated and IRL (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Ann E. Danis.

    While archaeologists are making leaps and bounds integrating digital technologies into their work-flow and interpretive strategies, an over-emphasis on the virtual has left a hole where thinking about how archaeologists, collaborators, stakeholders and the public actually encounter archaeology — IN REAL LIFE. While many post about living in a post-digital age, their is a kernel of truth to how many collaborators, especially youth, conceive of their worlds not as full of new media but as, "always...

  • "The Awakening Came with the Railroad": The history and archaeology of Southern Oregon’s Chinese Railroad Workers (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Chelsea E. Rose.

    On December 17, 1887, the final spike connecting the railroad between Oregon and California was driven in Ashland, Oregon.  Like earlier railroads, this track was largely constructed by Chinese workers.  However, due to experience and expertise, these men were able to demand better pay and working conditions than their earlier counterparts. Upon completion, the railroad continued to provide economic opportunities for Chinese residents in Southern Oregon. The Wah Chung Company supplied goods,...

  • The Backyard Shipwreck: The 2017 Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Field School Exploration Of A Shipwreck in Basin Harbor (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Allyson Ropp.

    The 2017 Field School held by the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum explored an unknown wreck lying in Basin Harbor. One of the primary reasons for the start of the museum, the wreck has been known about since the inception of the Basin Harbor Club around the harbor. Yet the identity, time period, and type of vessel still remain unknown. This year's field school aimed to answer some of these questions. Basing the research design on the previous research conducted on site in 1982 and 2016, the field...

  • Balls, Cocks, and Coquettes: The Dissonance of Washington’s Youth (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Laura Galke.

    Powerful messages concerning ideal gender roles are significant, yet latent features of presidential biographies. Most contemporary authors suggest that Washington succeeded despite the efforts of his mother, Mary Ball Washington. Biographers tend to be most offended by Mother Washington when she exercised agency. Archaeological investigations at Washington’s childhood home in Stafford County, Virginia underscore the dissonance between the material culture of his youth and popular narratives...

  • The Battle of KS-520: Results from a survey of a WWII battlefield off North Carolina's coast. (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph C Hoyt.

    When WWII came to the United States, the east coast became part of a massive naval battlefield. Few other areas better represent this activity than the waters off North Carolina. Monitor National Marine Sanctuary has been studying sites in the region associated with the Battle of the Atlantic for nearly ten years.  When convoy KS-520 was attacked by a German u-boat escort vessels sunk U-576 in a counterstrike. As a result, a stricken freighter and the u-boat that sunk it were lost. In 2014 the...

  • Battle of Midway: 2017's Exploration for Sunken Aircraft (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Bert S. Ho. Kelly Gleason Keogh.

    In May of 2017, the NPS' Submerged Resources Center and NOAA's Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument conducted an exploratory survey for sunken aircraft from WWII's Battle of Midway in June of 1942. What was found spanned the centuries of maritime activity at the Atoll including the battle. It also displayed on the seafloor all aspects of the military's long use of the island as a base, and their lasting impact on the island landscape. Today multiple federal agencies manage Midway as a...

  • Be Polite, Be Professional, But Have A Plan To Not Kill Every Shipwreck You Meet: Fusing Traditional Methods, and Cutting-Edge Geospatial Modeling to Adaptively Manage a Maritime Cultural Landscape Under Siege. (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher P. Morris. Kinney Clark.

    In the battle to preserve vulnerable historic maritime resources, recovery efforts after the unprecedented devastation of Superstorm Sandy highlighted a desperate need to locate, identify, and catalog the submerged resources of New Jersey. Today, resiliency undertakings, new development projects, plans to address rising sea levels and severe storms, have all encountered maritime archaeological resources. With over 1,600 known historic shipwrecks crowding only 150 miles of Atlantic coastline, and...

  • Bead Biographies: Exploring the Movement of Glass Beads in Colonial California (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Lee Panich. Rebecca Allen.

    Recent excavations at Mission San José (ca. 1797-1840s) in central California unearthed over 3,000 glass beads. Such items are commonly recovered from Spanish colonial missions and contemporaneous sites on the Pacific Coast of North America, yet they have proven difficult to interpret beyond their assumed role as trade beads. We believe there is great potential for the humble glass bead to serve as the reference point against which to understand the complex social relationships that constituted...

  • Beads, Burials, and African Diaspora Archaeology: Documenting a Pattern of Black and White Bead Use within African-American Mortuary Contexts (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only James Davidson.

    African Diaspora Archaeology has its roots in Plantation Archaeology of the 1960s and 1970s.    One artifact initially associated with enslaved contexts was the simple blue-glass bead (though other colors were recovered), recognized by some as signifying African-derived culture and beliefs, and by others as a controversial and potentially erroneous stereotype.  Simultaneously emerging in the 1970s was the field of historical mortuary archaeology, where graves of African-Americans as well as...

  • Beech Grove Soldiers Said They Were "Living Fat," And Archaeological Evidence Elaborates (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kim A. McBride.

    The Confederate encampment at Beech Grove from December 5, 1861 to January 19, 1862 was under the command of Brig. Gen. Felix Zollicoffer, but came to a rapid halt following the defeat of Confederate forces on January 19, 1862, including the death of Gen. Zollicoffer, in the nearby Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky.  This defeat led to a rapid abandonment of Beech Grove, with many supplies left in place.   We carried out unit and trench excavations in early April, 2017 at one earthwork and three...

  • Before the Emergence of the Modern World (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Robert Schuyler.

    Historical Archaeology, as properly defined, is the archaeology of the Modern World - plus or minus the last half millennium of human global evolution. Various inception dates have been suggested for the initiation of the processes that produced modernity:1415. 1453, 1481, 1492,1494, 1500, 1550 or even 1946. To fully understand the Modern World and its archaeology, its precursors and roots also need to be recognized. Techological diffusion spheres, interregional trade, continential movements of...

  • Before The War: A Japanese Family in Downtown San Luis Obispo, California (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Scott Baxter.

    In 2016 ESA excavated a ceramic- and bottle-filled privy associated with the Kurokawa family. During the first half of the 20th century, the Kurokawas lived in Dowtown San Luis Obispo where they also operated a vegetable store. During this time they retained strong ties with their homeland. In 1942 the family was forced to give up their home and livelyhood and move to a Japanese internment camp. Artifacts from this deposit give a glimpse into their daily life prior to their internment.

  • The Beginning of the End - An Economic Impact Analysis on Late 19th-Century Charcoal Production in the Roberts Mountains of Eureka County, Nevada (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only S. Joey LaValley.

    During the late 19th-century, mining companies in Eureka, Nevada depended on a steady flow of charcoal to fuel their smelters. This charcoal was produced in the hills and mountain ranges surrounding Eureka by teams of woodcutters, laborers, and charcoal burners also referred to as the Carbonari. As the demand for fuel persisted, land around Eureka was deforested and charcoal production expanded into areas well-away from the smelters. By the mid-1880s the demand for charcoal began decreasing as a...

  • Beneath the Parking Lot: Centuries of History at Gloucester Point (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Anna Hayden. Michele Brumfield. David A. Brown. Thane H. Harpole.

    Recent excavations on the campus of the Virginia Institute of Marine Science have shed new light on multiple periods of occupation at Gloucester Point, ranging from Woodland period native communities to the 21st-century development of the area. Working in advance of a large-scale construction project, archaeologists from DATA Investigations uncovered and excavated hundreds of features, providing a detailed glimpse at patterns of early 18th-century Gloucestertown buildings, efforts to clean up...

  • Best Practices for 3D Recordation and Visualization of Historical Archaeological Sites (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Brian Crane.

    The use of 3D recordation and visualization techniques on archaeological sites has expanded dramatically in recent years. In response to the popularity of these technologies, European practitioners have developed the London Charter for the Computer-Based Visualization of Cultural Heritage as a foundation for best practices. This paper discusses the London Charter and how it may be applicable to American Historical Archaeology. Issues include appropriate technology selection, documenting sources...

  • "A Better and Surer Food Supply": Promoting Foodways in the US Federal Education System for Alaska Natives, ca. 1884-1960 (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only mark cassell.

    The Alaska Organic Act of 1884 established federal civil administration for the new American colony ceded by Russia in 1867.  A key provision concerned the education of Alaska Natives: "The Secretary of the Interior shall make provision for the education of the children of school age in Alaska, without reference to race".  The federal education system for Alaska Natives, directed by missionaries after 1884, the US Bureau of Education after 1905, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs after 1931,...

  • Between Continents, Between Cities: Chinese Diaspora Archaeology in Stanford, California (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Christopher Lowman.

    Archaeology of the nineteenth century Chinese diaspora in the western United States has revealed networks of travel and trade between urban centers and rural living sites on both sides of the Pacific. Examining sites located between urban and rural settings highlights the frequent trade and travel made by individuals between dispersed communities. A combination of oral history and archaeology uncovers the ties between a late nineteenth-century Chinese community at Stanford, California, to...

  • Between the Devil and the Deep Red Tape (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Charles Ewen.

    Successful archaeological projects rely on good management from beginning to end. Difficult under the best circumstances, these difficulties are compounded when multiple agencies are involved.  Yet, the investigation of the Beaufort Inlet Wreck (aka the Queen Anne’s Revenge) has thrived, overcoming the entrenched bureaucracies of State Government and the University system to form a viable partnership that has produced remarkable results

  • Beyond the Bar: The Consumption of Alcohol in Productive Spaces (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Charlotte Goudge.

    The study of alcohol consumption has, in recent years, occupied much thought within modern academia. As a material culture, its ability to shed light on many social and economic themes has made alcohol consumption a vital part of human history. Places of consumption such as taverns have offered tantalising allusions to such themes as rebellion, subversion and freedom. However, alcohol consumption was not limited to those specialised spaces alone and was often consumed within the work and...

  • Beyond the Mansion: How the Archaeology Program at a Plantation Museum Changed so Many Lives (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Whitney Battle-Baptiste.

    Between 1988 and 2009, the Hermitage Archaeology Program trained students of archaeology, anthropology, history, and education. Summer after summer, as the excavation units were laid, the wheelbarrows lined up, the shovels and trowels counted and distributed, we were always excited about what was to come. I learned about who I was as an archaeologist, as a scholar of slavery and the African Diaspora, and a Black Feminist Archaeologist. This short reflection paper is to share some thoughts and...

  • Biographies of Things, People, and Space at Jesuit Missions: The St. Inigoes Manor Weaver’s House (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Steve Lenik.

    A biographical framework for archaeological studies of Jesuit missions in the Americas guides enquiry toward histories of specific artifacts, especially religious objects that were implicated in efforts to gain converts, as well as mission space including manor houses and churches. Additionally, narrative accounts of Jesuit missions lend themselves to biographies, either for the lives of influential missionaries or the missions, that were disseminated through texts such as the Relations. This...

  • A Biography of Place: Thinking Between Texts and Objects at the Saint Joseph Mission (Senegal) (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Johanna A. Pacyga.

    Mission archaeology benefits from a rich documentary archive produced by missionaries themselves, church and government officials, sponsors and charitable organizations, and—ideally—converts. Biography emerges as a potent method of organization and mode of analysis, allowing the archaeologist to name, follow, and order traces in the archives and the archaeological record. Thinking about archaeology as crafting a compelling biography of place allows for the articulation of intimacies and...

  • Black Women and Post-Emancipation Diaspora: A Community of Army Laundresses at Fort Davis, Texas (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Katrina C. L. Eichner.

    This paper investigates the role black women at U.S. military forts took in post emancipation diasporic events and movement. Using materials related daily life at a late 19th century, multi-ethnoracial, Indian Wars military fort in Fort Davis, Texas, I show how army laundresses acted as cultural brokers, navigating often contentious social and physical landscapes. With their identity as citizens, women, care-takers, employees, and racialized individuals constantly in flux, these women balanced...

  • Blackbeard’s Beads: Insights into the Queen Anne Revenge’s Former Life as a Slaver through the Presence of Glass Trade Beads (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kimberly Urban.

    Glass trade beads are one of the most notable artifacts of the Transatlantic Slave Trade. Beads played an important role in African culture spiritually, metaphysically, and historically.  Since its discovery in 1996, over 790 whole and fragmented glass beads have been recovered from the Queen Anne’s Revenge Shipwreck. The beads recovered from the Queen Ann’s Revenge have been identified, classified, cataloged, and compared to other bead assemblages recovered from underwater and terrestrial...

  • Blood, Sweat and Queers: Roller Derby and Queer Heritage (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Angela A. McComb. Nathan Klembara.

    Queer theory is a new and developing realm of heritage management; with the listing of historic places Stonewall National Monument and the Bayard Rustin Residence, queer heritage is attaining broader recognition. Investigations into the broader patterns of queer history will expose additional spaces and places with important associations to queer communities on multiple levels. Roller derby’s queer-normative environment has become a center of community-building in the last twenty years,...

  • Blue Willow Vessels and Life’s Other Mysteries: Understanding high value ceramics and their role in identity formation within contexts of company town economic deprivation (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only V. Camille Westmont.

    Historical archaeologists have long recognized the connection between material culture and identity. Ceramics, in particular, have the opportunity to inform researchers about economic choices, consumer decisions, and societal trends. However, when looking at communities that experience social and economic deprivation, the presence of (oftentimes more expensive) decorated vessels can cause confusion. Excavations conducted in 2016 focusing on the poorest workers’ housing in a coal company town in...

  • Boca, California- House On The Hill Project: Results of 2016 Field Survey (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Leo A. Demski.

    During 2016, fieldwork was carried out in the California Sierra Nevada Mountains at Boca, a late 19th century company town that provided lumber for the construction of the Southern Pacific Railroad and the Comstock mine. Boca was also one of the largest producers of naturally harvested ice, selling to individuals and companies, including the railroad. Use of iced railcars provided the means for the transcontinental railroad to successfully ship perishable goods long distances, giving later rise...

  • Boston Latin School: A Look At Ethnic And Engendered Spaces (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Kathleen von Jena.

    Boston Latin School: A Look at Ethnic and Engendered Spaces Kathleen von Jena, Boston Landmarks Commission   During the summer of 2015 the Boston City Archaeology Program conducted excavations on the site of the original Boston Latin School and neighboring Schoolmasters house dating to 1635-1748. Boston Latin was the first purpose-built free school in America where Cotton Mather, Benjamin Franklin, Samuel Adams and John Hancock attended. Public Archaeology conducted at this site provided an...

  • Both local and lointain: Environmental Archaeology and Palaeoecology at the îlot des Palais site, Quebec City. (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Allison L Bain. Reginald Auger.

    A decade of environmental and palaeoecological research at the îlot des Palais or Intendant’s Palace site in Quebec City has yielded rich and detailed datasets that document the site’s transformation from a marshy riverside setting to an important hive of activity for Intendants, artisans and occupants. The methods presented in this paper include archaeoentomology, zooarchaeology, dendrochronology and macrobotanical analyses. They demonstrate that products imported from the metropole and within...

  • Bottles at the Biry House: Consumption and Economic Choice in a Texas-Alsatian Household (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Emily Sainz.

    In 2014, students from Binghamton University excavated several historic features in the rear yard of a Texas-Alsatian homestead in Castroville, Texas.  This poster presents the analysis of the glass bottles found in Feature 7, a well built in the 19th century and filled in during the mid-20th century.  During this time, the well became a dumping ground for a range of historical materials discarded by later occupants of the house and other local residents, like the American Legion next door.  The...

  • Bound for America:An archaeological investigation to Yuegang (crescent) seaport as a main origin of Galleon cargo (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Chunming Wu.

    Yuegang (crescent seaport) was both the most famous and flourishing seaport of China during the late Ming dynasty, and as important as other seaports such as Macao in mainland China, Keelung in Taiwan, Nagasaki in Japan, Borneo in Indonesia, and Siam in Thailand, which connected with the key center of the Manila galleon trade in eastern Asia. Yuegang had not only been the main origin and outbound seaport of galleon cargoes such as Kraak ceramic, silk and tea from China, but also the main inbound...

  • Bricks On Black Water: A Comparative Landscape Analysis of an 1830s Brickyard (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Jess Hendrix.

    As a result of the development of a large U.S. military complex in the newly obtained territory of Florida, Pensacola experienced a historic Brick Boom in the 1830s. The opportunity to profit from brick manufacturing prompted many individuals to establish brickyards along the region's many waterways. The Scott Site is one such site, where excavations have been ongoing since 2008 via a joint-education program between Florida Public Archaeology Network and Milton High School. The resulting...

  • Bridging the Gap Between CRM and Academia: A Potential Model (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Michelle A. Slaughter. Karin Larkin.

    In general, State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPO) designed guidelines and timelines for compliance projects that mitigate cultural resources potentially impacted by proposed development. These purposes are fundamentally different from those of academic work and field schools, which focus on theory based interpretation and field techniques. Yet academic field schools are designed to prepare students for a professional life beyond their undergraduate career and for most that means working in...

  • A Brief History of Battle and Preservation of the Mill Springs Battlefield (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Joseph E. Brent.

    The Battle of Mill Springs, Kentucky, was fought on January 19, 1862. Gen. Felix Zollicoffer’s Confederate army arrived in Mill Springs on the south bank of the Cumberland in November 1861, an action that would hasten the advent of the battle. Some 5,000 Confederate soldiers crossed the river and established a fortified encampment at Beech Grove, where they built winter quarters—log huts—behind a line of fortifications. The encampment left a remarkable archaeological footprint.   Since 1992, the...

  • Bringing Water to the Desert: the Civilian Conservation Corps at Petrified Forest National Park (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only William T Reitze. Melyssa Huston.

    Over the last four years Petrified Forest National Park has begun to replace the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) installed waterline which carries drinking water to the original headquarters complex at Rainbow Forest. At the completion of the project in 1940 the Rainbow Forest Waterline represented the longest CCC hand-dug waterline in a National Park. Survey and recording, currently in progress, along the complete 26 mile corridor has documented a detailed archaeological record of the lives...

  • British Capital, Mercury Miners, and Transfer Print Ceramics in 19th Century Peru (2018)
    DOCUMENT Citation Only Douglas K Smit.

    During the late 18th century, Spanish colonies in South America increasingly liberalized their trade policies, leading to an increased access to British goods such as transfer print ceramics. In Peru, the importation of transfer print ceramics grew rapidly after independence in 1824, along with the entry of British capital into the mining sector of the Peruvian economy. This paper examines the role of transfer print ceramics at Santa Barbara, an indigenous mercury mining community located...